60

So I've been searching around and cannot find out exactly how to do this. I'm creating a user control using MVVM and would like to run a command on the 'Loaded' event. I realize this requires a little bit of code behind, but I can't quite figure out what's needed. The command is located in the ViewModel, which is set as the datacontext of the view, but I'm not sure exactly how to route this so I can call it from the code behind of the loaded event. Basically what I want is something like this...

private void UserControl_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    //Call command from viewmodel
}

Looking around I can't seem to find the syntax for this anywhere. Do I need to bind the command in the xaml first to be able to reference it? I notice the command bindings option within a user control will not let you bind commands as you can within something like a button...

<UserControl.CommandBindings>
    <CommandBinding Command="{Binding MyCommand}" /> <!-- Throws compile error -->
</UserControl.CommandBindings>

I'm sure there's a simple way to do this, but I can't for the life of me figure it out.

121

Well, if the DataContext is already set you could cast it and call the command:

var viewModel = (MyViewModel)DataContext;
if (viewModel.MyCommand.CanExecute(null))
    viewModel.MyCommand.Execute(null);

(Change parameter as needed)

  • 1
    Yeah that's exactly what I needed, I knew there was an easy way. Thanks! – Kevin DiTraglia Apr 12 '12 at 15:53
  • 1
    @KDiTraglia: You're welcome, glad it helped. – H.B. Apr 12 '12 at 15:53
  • You should be checking if viewModel is null before trying to access MyCommand. I know my solution doesn't, but yours it the accepted answer so it should probably be in there. – Alain Apr 12 '12 at 15:57
  • 2
    @Alain: There's a note in my preface, i think people can introduce a check if in their case that is not guaranteed. – H.B. Apr 12 '12 at 15:58
  • When MyCommand in the ViewModel is defined with a certain MyMethod, why then would you not just execute viewModel.MyMethod()? Apart from the CanExecute which of course can be also called directly. – Gerard Feb 18 '14 at 22:55
5

Preface: Without knowing more about your requirements, it seems like a code smell to execute a command from code-behind upon loading. There has to be a better way, MVVM-wise.

But, if you really need to do it in code behind, something like this would probably work (note: I cannot test this at the moment):

private void UserControl_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)     
{
    // Get the viewmodel from the DataContext
    MyViewModel vm = this.DataContext as MyViewModel;

    //Call command from viewmodel     
    if ((vm != null) && (vm.MyCommand.CanExecute(null)))
        vm.MyCommand.Execute(null);
} 

Again - try to find a better way...

  • 1
    Upon searching on the topic, there really isn't any easy way, and the general consensus I've seen is a little code behind never killed anyone. – Kevin DiTraglia Apr 12 '12 at 15:54
  • 1
    @KDiTraglia - true, but generally speaking, the "little code behind" generally refers to actions that effect only the View itself (i.e. things like selecting all the text in a text box when it gains focus). Here, you are interacting directly with the ViewModel from the View's code-behind, which breaks the MVVM principle. – Wonko the Sane Apr 12 '12 at 17:25
1

Try this:

private void UserControl_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    //Optional - first test if the DataContext is not a MyViewModel
    if( !this.DataContext is MyViewModel) return;
    //Optional - check the CanExecute
    if( !((MyViewModel) this.DataContext).MyCommand.CanExecute(null) ) return;
    //Execute the command
    ((MyViewModel) this.DataContext).MyCommand.Execute(null)
}
  • 2
    You should not call a Command without ensuring that it can be executed first. – H.B. Apr 12 '12 at 15:52
  • If you are only using the CanExecute to determine whether the user can execute it (i.e. Binding to a button's enabled state) there's nothing wrong with it. – Alain Apr 12 '12 at 15:55
  • 3
    With a button the control ensures that the command is never executed carelessly, if you execute it manually you need to take care of that yourself. – H.B. Apr 12 '12 at 15:56
1

I have a more compact solution that I want to share. Because I often execute commands in my ViewModels, I got tired of writing the same if statement. So I wrote an extension for ICommand interface.

using System.Windows.Input;

namespace SharedViewModels.Helpers
{
    public static class ICommandHelper
    {
        public static bool CheckBeginExecute(this ICommand command)
        {
            return CheckBeginExecuteCommand(command);
        }

        public static bool CheckBeginExecuteCommand(ICommand command)
        {
            var canExecute = false;
            lock (command)
            {
                canExecute = command.CanExecute(null);
                if (canExecute)
                {
                    command.Execute(null);
                }
            }

            return canExecute;
        }
    }
}

And this is how you would execute command in code:

((MyViewModel)DataContext).MyCommand.CheckBeginExecute();

I hope this will speed up your development just a tiny bit more. :)

P.S. Don't forget to include the ICommandHelper's namespace too. (In my case it is SharedViewModels.Helpers)

  • why not just pass true? eg: WizardViewModel.OkCommand.Execute(true); – AZ_ Mar 22 '18 at 14:48
0

You also might have embedded your code in any MessaginCenter.Subscribe and work with MessagingCenter model. If you intend only execute something from code behind instead of clicking in a view button with Command property, it worked perfectly to me.

I hope it helps someone.

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