143

I have two images that need to kept inline; I want to write a caption under each image.

<center>
   <a href="http://example.com/hello">
       <img src="hello.png" width="100px" height="100px">
   </a>
   &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 
   <a href="http://example.com/hi">
       <img src="hi.png" width="100px" height="100px">
   </a>
</center>

How can I implement?

3
  • 8
    @ceejayoz not to mention all the &nbsp as opposed to say setting a margin, or using other css layout tools.
    – jzworkman
    Apr 12 '12 at 17:52
  • While this has essentially been answered, the only way I've found to get a caption to fit an inline image's width is to hard-code the width property on a wrapper or the caption itself.
    – MyNameIsKo
    Apr 29 '14 at 15:51
  • 3
    @McGarnagle do not edit code meaning in other people's posts. Formating is OK (well unless it's python), but all code contents are important! Thanks to your edit, jxworkmans post looked meaningless. And really, fixing wrong code in question is complete nonsense. What would be the point of answers then? Dec 30 '14 at 17:14
300

Figure and Figcaption tags:

<figure>
    <img src='image.jpg' alt='missing' />
    <figcaption>Caption goes here</figcaption>
</figure>

Gotta love HTML5.


See sample

#container {
    text-align: center;
}
a, figure {
    display: inline-block;
}
figcaption {
    margin: 10px 0 0 0;
    font-variant: small-caps;
    font-family: Arial;
    font-weight: bold;
    color: #bb3333;
}
figure {
    padding: 5px;
}
img:hover {
    transform: scale(1.1);
    -ms-transform: scale(1.1);
    -webkit-transform: scale(1.1);
    -moz-transform: scale(1.1);
    -o-transform: scale(1.1);
}
img {
    transition: transform 0.2s;
    -webkit-transition: -webkit-transform 0.2s;
    -moz-transition: -moz-transform 0.2s;
    -o-transition: -o-transform 0.2s;
}
<div id="container">
    <a href="#">
        <figure>
            <img src="http://lorempixel.com/100/100/nature/1/" width="100px" height="100px" />
            <figcaption>First image</figcaption>
        </figure>
    </a>
    <a href="#">
        <figure>
             <img src="http://lorempixel.com/100/100/nature/2/" width="100px" height="100px" />
            <figcaption>Second image</figcaption>
        </figure>
    </a>
</div>

5
  • 1
    You'll need an HTML5 shim for most of IE, though.
    – ceejayoz
    Apr 12 '12 at 17:53
  • 12
    Those tags do not help in any way. They are just dummy markup, and you need to do all the work in CSS (and/or with other HTML tags). And you need an extra operation to make old versions of IE to recognize them even as dummy tags. So it is simpler to use div or span. Apr 12 '12 at 19:54
  • 17
    @JukkaK.Korpela These tags are very important. stackoverflow.com/a/17272444/756329 and html5doctor.com/lets-talk-about-semantics
    – Joe Hansen
    Oct 9 '14 at 17:10
  • 5
    The problem is this: [figures] can be moved to another page or to an appendix without affecting the main flow. <figure> and <figcaption> aren't general-purpose replacements for images with captions. They only apply to figures. If you (for example) have a step-by-step how-to that is composed of paragraphs intermixed with captioned photos, it may be important that the images are presented at the same paragraph breaks as defined in the html. Hence <figure> would not be applicable here (as I understand). Apr 3 '16 at 6:49
  • I'd add that these lines do not necessarily place a figure caption under an image. The HTML given here describes the content, but the appearance is affected/determined by CSS.
    – jvriesem
    Nov 12 '19 at 21:46
23

CSS

#images{
    text-align:center;
    margin:50px auto; 
}
#images a{
    margin:0px 20px;
    display:inline-block;
    text-decoration:none;
    color:black;
 }

HTML

<div id="images">
    <a href="http://xyz.com/hello">
        <img src="hello.png" width="100px" height="100px">
        <div class="caption">Caption 1</div>
    </a>
    <a href="http://xyz.com/hi">
        <img src="hi.png" width="100px" height="100px"> 
        <div class="caption">Caption 2</div>
    </a>
</div>​

​A fiddle is here.

0
8

Put the image — let's say it's width is 140px — inside of a link:

<a><img src='image link' style='width: 140px'></a>

Next, put the caption in a and give it a width less than your image, while centering it:

<a>
  <img src='image link' style='width: 140px'>
  <div style='width: 130px; text-align: center;'>I just love to visit this most beautiful place in all the world.</div>
</a>

Next, in the link tag, style the link so that it no longer looks like a link. You can give it any color you want, but just remove any text decoration your links may carry.

<a style='text-decoration: none; color: orange;'>
  <img src='image link' style='width: 140px'>
  <div style='width: 130px; text-align: center;'>I just love to visit this most beautiful place in all the world.</div>
</a>

I wrapped the image with it's caption in a link so that no text could push the caption out of the way: The caption is tied to the picture by the link. Here's an example: http://www.alphaeducational.com/p/okay.html

4
  • 1
    Block tags like <div> are not allowed inside inline tags like <a> - you should use <span> for the captions. Jan 22 '15 at 9:48
  • Replacing <div> with <span> fails totally in @TheAlpha's example. Looks like you need <div>.
    – Pierre
    Oct 11 '15 at 15:09
  • @mindplay.dk I think because the a tag's content model is transparent it can accept any children that the parent tag can (except for interactive content). Correct me if I'm wrong? I want to learn. w3.org/TR/html5/text-level-semantics.html#the-a-element
    – Chris Bier
    Jan 5 '16 at 18:17
  • @Pierre because span is an inline element. You could use span or div, but you'd need to add display: inline-block;.
    – RedGuy11
    Aug 28 at 22:34
7
<div style="margin: 0 auto; text-align: center; overflow: hidden;">
  <div style="float: left;">
    <a href="http://xyz.com/hello"><img src="hello.png" width="100px" height="100px"></a>
    caption 1
  </div>
 <div style="float: left;">
   <a href="http://xyz.com/hi"><img src="hi.png" width="100px" height="100px"></a>
   caption 2                      
 </div>
</div>
0
5

For responsive images. You can add the picture and source tags within the figure tag.

<figure>
  <picture>
    <source media="(min-width: 750px)" srcset="images/image_2x.jpg"/>
    <source media="(min-width: 500px)" srcset="images/image.jpg" />
    <img src="images.jpg" alt="An image">
  </picture>
  <figcaption>Caption goes here</figcaption>
</figure>
2

CSS is your friend; there is no need for the center tag (not to mention it is quite depreciated) nor the excessive non-breaking spaces. Here is a simple example:

CSS

.images {
    text-align:center;
}
.images img {
    width:100px;
    height:100px;
}
.images div {
    width:100px;
    text-align:center;
}
.images div span {
    display:block;
}
.margin_right {
    margin-right:50px;
}
.float {
    float:left;
}
.clear {
    clear:both;
    height:0;
    width:0;
}

HTML

<div class="images">
    <div class="float margin_right">
        <a href="http://xyz.com/hello"><img src="hello.png" width="100px" height="100px" /></a>
        <span>This is some text</span>
    </div>
    <div class="float">
        <a href="http://xyz.com/hi"><img src="hi.png" width="100px" height="100px" /></a>
        <span>And some more text</span>
    </div>
    <span class="clear"></span>
</div>
0

To be more semantically correct and answer the OPs orginal question about aligning them side by side I would use this:

HTML

<div class="items">
<figure>
    <img src="hello.png" width="100px" height="100px">
    <figcaption>Caption 1</figcaption>
</figure>
<figure>
    <img src="hi.png" width="100px" height="100px"> 
    <figcaption>Caption 2</figcaption>
</figure></div>

CSS

.items{
text-align:center;
margin:50px auto;}


.items figure{
margin:0px 20px;
display:inline-block;
text-decoration:none;
color:black;}

https://jsfiddle.net/c7borg/jLzc6h72/3/

0

The <figcaption> tag in HTML5 allows you to enter text to your image for example:

<figcaption>
Your text here
</figcaption>.

You can then use CSS to position the text where it should be on the image.

-5
<table>
<tr><td><img ...><td><img ...>
<tr><td>caption1<td>caption2
</table>

Style as desired.

1
  • 10
    I would never do this. The person is asking for presentation advice not how to display content in tabular format. Apr 1 '14 at 4:46

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