10

I want to execute a cmd on PowerShell and this command uses semicolons. Then PowerShell interprets it as multiple commands. How do I make PowerShell ignore the semicolons and execute my command how a unique command?

Example:

Invoke-Expression "msbuild /t:Build;PipelinePreDeployCopyAllFilesToOneFolder /p:Configuration=Debug;_PackageTempDir=$TargetFolder $WebProject"

Another example:

Invoke-Expression "test`;test2"

And the second example response:

The term 'test' is not recognized as the name of a cmdlet, function, script file, or operable program. Check
the spelling of the name, or if a path was included, verify that the path is correct and try again.
At line:1 char:6
+ teste <<<< ;teste2
    + CategoryInfo          : ObjectNotFound: (teste:String) [], CommandNotFoundException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : CommandNotFoundException

The term 'test2' is not recognized as the name of a cmdlet, function, script file, or operable program. Chec
k the spelling of the name, or if a path was included, verify that the path is correct and try again.
At line:1 char:13
+ teste;teste2 <<<<
    + CategoryInfo          : ObjectNotFound: (teste2:String) [], CommandNotFoundException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : CommandNotFoundException
  • In the second case iex "test;test2" - it isn't necessary to escape the semicolon. – Keith Hill Apr 13 '12 at 3:51
2

As an alternative to Start-Process, you can just call the command as you would similarly call it using cmd.exe using the call operator &:

& msbuild /t:Build;PipelinePreDeployCopyAllFilesToOneFolder /p:Configuration=Debug;_PackageTempDir=$TargetFolder $WebProject
  • Great! With this and the escape char I solved my problem. Thanks! – wallybh Apr 13 '12 at 12:37
  • 2
    @wallybh Cool, you should also be able to quote the arguments too like this "/t:Build;PipelinePreDeployCopyAllFilesToOneFolder" to not have to escape the semi colon. – Andy Arismendi Apr 13 '12 at 15:48
  • 1
    Just escape it will ya? – Aliostad Feb 12 '15 at 9:36
24

Just escape the semicolon on the command line:

msbuild /t:Build`;PipelinePreDeployCopyAllFilesToOneFolder /p:Configuration=Debug`;_PackageTempDir=$TargetFolder $WebProject

I do this all the time with the tf.exe utility:

tf.exe status . /r /workspace:WORK`;johndoe

FYI, this issue has been heavily voted up on Connect. PowerShell v3 addresses this issue with the new --% operator:

$env:TargetFolder = $TargetFolder
msbuild $WebProject --% /t:Build;PipelinePreDeployCopyAllFilesToOneFolder /p:Configuration=Debug;_PackageTempDir=%TargetFolder%
2

Try using Start-Process to run MSbuild then pass the rest as a value with -Argument.

  • +1 - Makes more sense than playing with the strings. – JNK Apr 12 '12 at 20:53
  • Yes it works. But I could not retrieve the MSbuild exit code. – wallybh Apr 13 '12 at 12:35
  • @wallybh To get the exit code with Start-Process you have to do 2 things, use the -PassThru param and assign the output to a variable and check its ExitCode property and use the -Wait param. – Andy Arismendi Apr 13 '12 at 15:44
  • @AndyArismendi yeah It works! Thanks man! – wallybh Apr 13 '12 at 17:06
2

The easiest way to ignore a semicolon? Simply use a single quote versus double quote!

In PowerShell, the type of quote you use matters. A double quote will let PowerShell do string expansion (so if you have a variable $something = someprogram.exe, and run "$something", PowerShell substitutes in "someprogram.exe").

If you don't need string substitution/variable expansion then just use single-quotes. PowerShell will execute single-quoted strings exactly as listed.

Another option if you want to use string expansion is to use a here-string instead. A here string is just like a regular string, however it begins and ends with an @ sign on its own separate line, like so:

$herestring = @"
Do some stuff here, even use a semicolon ;
"@

This is a best-of-both-worlds scenario, as you can use your fancy characters and have them work, but still get Variable expansion, which you do not get with single-quotes.

1

Here is an example of the way I use to call native EXE files with commented usage and parameters:

# Gen-CACert.ps1
clear-host

$scriptBlock = {.\Makecert -n `"CN=PowerShell Authorite de certification`"  <# Sujet du certificat (conforme à la norme X50 #>`
                           -a sha1                                          <# Algorithme utilisé #>`
                           -eku 1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.3                           <# Option du certificat (signature de code) #>`
                           -r                                               <# Certificat auto signé #>`
                           <# -ss `"$($args[0])`"                              Dossier de stockage du certificat #>`
                           -ss `"root`"                                     <# Dossier de stockage du certificat #>`
                           -sr localMachine                                 <# Magasin de stockage localmachine ou currentuser (defaut) #>`
                           -sv `"$($args[0]).pvk`"                          <# Nom du fichier contenant la clef privée #>`
                           `"$($args[0]).cer`"}                             <# Nom du fichier certificat #>

$PoshCARoot = "PoshCARoot"
Invoke-Command -ScriptBlock $scriptBlock  -ArgumentList $PoshCARoot

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