21

Is there a way to know the root path of my gem? I am trying to load a default config from a yaml inside the gems path. How do I get the gems root directory with ruby?

28

Given the following project structure:

your_gem/
  lib/
    your_gem.rb

Here's how I would do it:

# your_gem.rb

module YourGem
  def self.root
    File.expand_path '../..', __FILE__
  end
end

Ruby 2.0 introduced the Kernel#__dir__ method; it enables a considerably shorter solution:

# your_gem.rb

module YourGem
  def self.root
    File.dirname __dir__
  end
end

If you need access to the other directories, you can simply build upon root:

module YourGem
  def self.bin
    File.join root, 'bin'
  end

  def self.lib
    File.join root, 'lib'
  end
end
  • Worked for me for referencing my "docs" folder included as part of the gemspec, where using the default Rails.root.join("docs") fails. THanks! – user1431084 Mar 5 '14 at 15:56
  • I'm using ruby 2.0.0p0 (2013-02-24 revision 39474). File.dirname __dir__ does not work for me. I get this error: TypeError: no implicit conversion of nil into String. Happen to know why? Thanks. – E.E.33 Dec 29 '14 at 5:21
  • @E.E.33, __dir__ is documented to return nil if __FILE__ is also nil. How are you running your script? – Matheus Moreira Dec 29 '14 at 5:26
  • I was just opening up irb and running the command __dir__. I just ran if from a file, and got the desired results. Thanks mate! – E.E.33 Dec 29 '14 at 5:38
  • File.expand_path('../', File.dirname(__FILE__) is what I usually see. – Powers Aug 26 '15 at 19:52
26

This is a universal solution for executables and libs. It loads the specification using the Gem API, so the path is always correct:

spec = Gem::Specification.find_by_name("your_gem_name")
gem_root = spec.gem_dir
yaml_obj = YAML.load(gem_root + "/file_name.yaml")
  • 3
    Use File.join instead of string concatenation. – Matheus Moreira Apr 17 '14 at 19:58
  • @MatheusMoreira why does it matter? – Some Guy Sep 18 '15 at 19:11
  • 1
    File.join ensures that you use the appropriate path separator for your OS which makes the code cross-platorm. "/" is specific to linux. Many versions (all?) of Microsoft Windows uses "\". – Jonathan R. Wallace May 18 '16 at 21:05
  • 2
    @JonathanR.Wallace - Agreed that File.join helps with platform/application compatibility, however the Windows File I/O API will convert any "/" into "\" that it finds in the path. That said many Windows apps that check paths will fail on a "/" instead of leaving the OS to decide what to do. See note: Naming Files, Paths and Namespaces – kstuart Aug 27 '16 at 14:52
6

gem list <gem> -d

Or if you're using bundler:

bundle show <gem>

  • Within the gem itself: im trying to call File.load. What is the gem root? – Jason Waldrip Apr 12 '12 at 23:50

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