3

I am wanting to know if I can test (using JUnit) that a specific message generated by an exception gets thrown rather than just "whether or not" an exception was thrown. For example the JunitTest.java code will actually pass the test because an exception was thrown but if I also wanted to test that the string generated by the exception was equal to: "Test Exception: Integer may not be negative.." is this possible?

TestException.java

public class TestException extends Exception {  
    /**
     * @param message informative message about the problem found
     */
    public TestException (String message) {
        super("Test Exception: " + message);
    }
}

Test.java

public void function(Integer mustBePositive) throws TestException {
    if (mustBePositive < 0) {
        throw new TestException("Integer may not be negative..");
    }
    else {
        mustBePositive = myNum
    }
}

JunitTest.java

import org.junit.*;

public class JUnitTest {

    @Test(expected = TestException.class)
    public void functionTest() throws TestException {
        function(-1);
    }
}
8

Note: I think @Matthew's answer is superior.

You can use the following structure - it tests that the correct exception was thrown (TestException.class) and that the message is as expected.

@Test(expected = TestException.class)
public void test_function_negative() {
    try {
        function(-5);
    } catch (TestException ex) {
        assertEquals("Integer may not be negative..", ex.getMessage());
        throw ex;
    }
}

EDIT
Why I rethrow the exception (following a comment): the first test below passes while the second does not. So it adds an extra layer of validation. Now If I caught ExceptionB in the code below, both tests would fail.

@Test
public void test1() throws ExceptionB {
    try {
        throw new ExceptionA();
    } catch (ExceptionA e) {
        assertEquals("message", e.getMessage());
    }
}

@Test(expected=ExceptionB.class)
public void test2() throws ExceptionA {
    try {
        throw new ExceptionA();
    } catch (ExceptionA e) {
        assertEquals("message", e.getMessage());
        throw e;
    }
}

public class ExceptionA extends Exception{
    @Override
    public String getMessage() {
        return "message";
    }
}
public class ExceptionB extends ExceptionA{}
  • Thankyou this was exactly what I was after :) – Samwisest Apr 13 '12 at 12:21
  • Should be assertTrue in this case. – Oh Chin Boon Apr 13 '12 at 12:23
  • It was working but I have amended to your version which is better. – assylias Apr 13 '12 at 12:24
  • It would burn my soul to state the exception class in the code, and then have to do it again in @Test. – Tony Ennis Apr 13 '12 at 12:29
  • 1
    @TonyEnnis Your soul heats a lot ;) – assylias Apr 13 '12 at 13:51
6

You can use the standard JUnit TestRule ExpectedException. This allows you to test that an exception is thrown, and also test the message that accompanies the Exception. For instance:

public static class HasExpectedException {
  @Rule
  public ExpectedException thrown= ExpectedException.none();

  @Test
  public void throwsNothing() {
    // no exception expected, none thrown: passes.
  }

  @Test
  public void throwsNullPointerException() {
    thrown.expect(NullPointerException.class);
    throw new NullPointerException();
  }

  @Test
  public void throwsNullPointerExceptionWithMessage() {
    thrown.expect(NullPointerException.class);
    thrown.expectMessage("happened?");
    thrown.expectMessage(startsWith("What"));
    throw new NullPointerException("What happened?");
  }
}

The expectMessage() takes either a String (a substring of the message) or a Matcher, so you can do regular expression checking or whatever.

2
assertEquals("Test Exception: Integer may not be negative..", e.getMessage());
1

I do it this way:

  @Test
  public void functionTest() throws TestException {
    try {
        function(-1);
        fail("This should have thrown an exception.");
    } catch (TextException e) {
       assertEquals("exception test produced an unexpected message", EXPECTED_TEXT, e.getMessage());
    }
  }

This may not be elegant but it is easy to understand and covers all the bases. disclaimer - I have not compiled it.

1

Others have already pointed out the structure you can use to test this but I wouldn't test the message itself as this can be quite brittle.

You should create a custom exception that gets given all the data required and just assert that data is there. If you really care about the message then you can unit test that separately on the exception itself.

Given your example:

public void function(Integer mustBePositive) throws TestException {
    if (mustBePositive < 0) {
        throw new TestException("Integer may not be negative..");
    }
    else {
        mustBePositive = myNum
    }

You could just throw a NegativeNumberException. If you really want to know what the number is, you could modify your code to take that as the argument:

public void function(Integer mustBePositive) throws TestException {
    if (mustBePositive < 0) {
        throw new NegativeNumberException(mustBePositive);
    }
    else {
        mustBePositive = myNum
    }

Then in your test:

 @Test(expected = NegativeNumberException.class)
 public void functionTest() throws TestException {
    try {
        function(-1);
    } catch (NegativeNumberException nne) {
        assertThat(nne.getNumber(), equalTo(-1));
    }
 }

Your exception can now generate the message however it sees fit, and changes to that output won't ripple through the rest of your test code

  • If the string was important I would test it. Unless the string is dynamic, I wouldn't consider such a test any more brittle than any other test. In any event, the string should be a public constant in TestJava. Then the test (and the actual code) could refer to the constant. – Tony Ennis Apr 13 '12 at 13:57
  • 1
    If the string is important enough to test then having it as a constant referenced by both your test code and your production code leads to a pointless test. All you're then testing is that they reference the same string, but nothing to verify that the actual string is correct – tddmonkey Apr 20 '12 at 14:49
1

catch-exception is made to support this scenario:

import static com.googlecode.catchexception.CatchException.*;

public void testFunction() throws Exception {
    verifyException(obj).function(-1);
    assertEquals("Integer may not be negative..", 
                 caughtException().getMessage());
}
-1

import org.junit. * ;

public class JUnitTest {

@Test
public void functionTest() throws TestException {
    try {
        function (-1);
        fail("");
    } catch (TestException e) {
        if (!e.getMessage().equals("Integer may not be negative..")) 
          fail("");
    }
}
  • If you're going to do this you should use assertEquals or assertThat. If this test fails there is no output as to why – tddmonkey Apr 13 '12 at 12:16

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