6

I need to catch some VBA error using the GoTo statement like this :

Sub mySub
 On Error GoTo errorHandler:
    Workbooks.Open("myWorkbook")
'
' Some Code
'
errorHandler:
MsgBox "ERROR"

End Sub

The problem is that when there is no error the errorHandler section is executed.
I found this discussion but the answer doesn't solve my issue.
I tried adding an Exit Sub statement as explained :

Sub mySub
 On Error GoTo errorHandler:
    Workbooks.Open("myWorkbook")
    Exit Sub

'
' Some Code
'
errorHandler:
  MsgBox "ERROR"

End Sub

In this case it exits the method when there is no error. I also tried :

 Sub mySub
 On Error GoTo errorHandler:
    Workbooks.Open("myWorkbook")
'
' Some Code
'
errorHandler:
  MsgBox "ERROR"
  Exit Sub
End Sub

But still the same issue: The errorHandler is executed even when no errors occur.

12

Just put Exit sub in.

Sub mySub
 On Error GoTo myHandler:
    Workbooks.Open("myWorkbook")
'
' Some Code
'
Exit sub

myHandler:
MsgBox "EROOR !"

err.clear
End Sub
  • 1
    Can you add the line On Error Goto 0? So OP understands that it's a good practice resetting error redirects... Upvoted :) – Marco Apr 13 '12 at 13:02
  • @Marco Do you mean err.Clear? This is VBA. – Fionnuala Apr 13 '12 at 13:05
  • 1
    @Remou: maybe I'm wrong, but I remember I used (many years ago) On Error Goto 0 to make code behave without error checking. And I remember it was a good practice to use this instruction to avoid unpredictable jumps for later errors... I searched Google to see if I was wrong, but here I found an article giving me On Error Goto 0... – Marco Apr 13 '12 at 13:07
  • 1
    @Marco: I see no reason to use On Error GoTo 0, and I've never seen it in an error handler either... I've seen it in an ExitProcedure: type thing (example) to avoid infinite error handling "loops". – Jean-François Corbett Apr 13 '12 at 15:51
  • 2
    On Error GoTo 0 turns error handling OFF, tells VB/VBA to stop and throw up an error message if an error is encountered. It also (implicitly) clears the error condition. In a simple case like this, there's probably no disadvantage to using it but in other cases where you'd want to trap an error, deal with it then resume processing, you definitely wouldn't want to use GoTo 0. And even in this simple case, there's no advantage to it; on the whole, a bad habit to get into, I'd say. – Steve Rindsberg Apr 13 '12 at 17:59
4

Here's the pattern I prefer:

Sub SomeSub()
    On Error GoTo ErrorLabel

    'Code goes here

ExitLabel:
   'Clean-up code, if any, goes here 
   Exit Sub

ErrorLabel:
    'Error-handling code goes here
    Resume ExitLabel
End Sub

Note that Resume clears the error. I like this pattern for a few reasons:

  1. Habitually inserting the exit block before the error-handling block reduces the chance that I'll have the OP's problem of accidentally dropping into the error handler.
  2. I use GoTo ExitLabel for any early exit from the Sub or Function. This way, I'm less likely to skip the clean-up code by accident. Example:

    Sub SomeOtherSub()
        Dim x As ResourceThatNeedsToBeClosed
        Dim i As Long
        On Error GoTo ErrorLabel
        Set x = GetX
        For i = 1 To 100
            If x.SomeFunction(i) Then
                GoTo ExitLabel
            End If
        Next
    ExitLabel:
        x.Close
    ErrorLabel:
        'Error-handling code goes here
        Resume ExitLabel
    End Sub
    
  • Yes, I prefer this too. It seems to be the standard for apps that automatically insert error handling blocks as well. I even have a little code to remove and to create outline error handling in this format. – Fionnuala Apr 15 '12 at 7:36
1
Public Sub MySub
    On Error Goto Skip

    ' Some Codes

Skip:
    If err.Number > 0 Then

        ' Run whatever codes if error occurs

        err.Clear
    End If
    On Error Goto 0
End Su
0

I am having the exact same issue as you, and the solutions above did not work. They clearly didn't even see you wrote Exit Sub in already in 2 different places in your original post. No site online seems to understand that sometimes there won't be an error (if there was always going to be an error, why did you code it that way?), and when there isn't an error, you obviously don't want to Exit Sub. Nor do you want the myHandler to run when there isn't an error. DUH! This is the solution I cam up with which seems to work.

On Error GoTo ErrorHandler
'This is the thing I am trying to do...
Workbooks("SpreadSolver.xlsb").Activate
'If it works, great. 
'Don't touch the error stuff and move on. 
'I.e. go to the part that I know works (the rest of the macro)
GoTo ThisPartWorks

'If the thing I am trying to do doesn't work...
ErrorHandler:
MsgBox "Error: Please open Spread Solver and then run the macro."
'Only want to Exit Sub if there is an error.. duh.
Exit Sub

ThisPartWorks:
'the rest of your macro can go here...
'...
End Sub
  • The accepted answer should work whether there's an error or not, and this is actually the right way to handle errors in VBA. On the other hand, using GoTo to move around code is considered very bad practice, especially if you will be using multiple GoTo statements. – Ahmed Abdelhameed Jan 31 '17 at 17:25
  • The OP put Exit Sub in two wrong different places. You just need to put it in the right place (i.e right before your error handling code). – Ahmed Abdelhameed Jan 31 '17 at 17:25
0

I use an If statement, within the ErrorHandler, which will stop execution if there is no error. This is achieved by using the Err.Number (Err (object) number (e.g. Run-time error 9: Subscript out of range))

If Err.Number >= 1 Then
MsgBox ("Message")
End
Else: other code
End If
Exit Sub
0

This is what I have done. Works like a charm

Sub someProgram ()
    On Error goto Handler:
        x = 7/0

    'Some code you wanna execute  with or without error
Exit Sub

Handler:
     'Write your handler here

Resume next 'After handling error, this line will help you resume the next line

End sub
0

Use below code in error handler section:

if err.number>0 the
    ' error handling goes here
else
    ' some code
end if

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.