What is the most efficient way given to raise an integer to the power of another integer in C?

// 2^3
pow(2,3) == 8

// 5^5
pow(5,5) == 3125
  • 1
    When you say "efficiency," you need to specify efficient in relation to what. Speed? Memory usage? Code size? Maintainability? – Andy Lester Oct 2 '08 at 17:26
  • Doesn't C have a pow() function? – jalf May 30 '09 at 13:07
  • 13
    yes, but that works on floats or doubles, not on ints – Nathan Fellman May 30 '09 at 13:46
  • If you're sticking to actual ints (and not some huge-int class), a lot of calls to ipow will overflow. It makes me wonder if there's a clever way to pre-calculate a table and reduce all the non-overflowing combinations to a simple table lookup. This would take more memory than most of the general answers, but perhaps be more efficient in terms of speed. – Adrian McCarthy Jan 7 '16 at 17:15
  • pow() not a safe function – EsmaeelE Oct 29 '17 at 15:42

17 Answers 17

up vote 350 down vote accepted

Exponentiation by squaring.

int ipow(int base, int exp)
{
    int result = 1;
    for (;;)
    {
        if (exp & 1)
            result *= base;
        exp >>= 1;
        if (!exp)
            break;
        base *= base;
    }

    return result;
}

This is the standard method for doing modular exponentiation for huge numbers in asymmetric cryptography.

  • 30
    You should probably add a check that "exp" isn't negative. Currently, this function will either give a wrong answer or loop forever. (Depending on whether >>= on a signed int does zero-padding or sign-extension - C compilers are allowed to pick either behaviour). – user9876 Jul 28 '09 at 16:42
  • 2
    GSL's gsl_sf_pow_int implements this, including the negative case handling: gnu.org/software/gsl/manual/html_node/Power-Function.html – Rhys Ulerich Apr 14 '10 at 22:29
  • 19
    I wrote a more optimized version of this, freely downloadable here: gist.github.com/3551590 On my machine it was about 2.5x faster. – orlp Aug 31 '12 at 11:18
  • 10
    @AkhilJain: It's perfectly good C; to make it valid also in Java, replace while (exp) and if (exp & 1) with while (exp != 0) and if ((exp & 1) != 0) respectively. – Ilmari Karonen Apr 8 '13 at 16:38
  • 3
    @ZinanXing Multiplying n times results in more multiplications and is slower. This method saves multiplications by effectively reusing them. E.g., to calculate n^8 the naïve method of n*n*n*n*n*n*n*n uses 7 multiplications. This algorithm instead computes m=n*n, then o=m*m, then p=o*o, where p = n^8, with just three multiplications. With large exponents the difference in performance is significant. – bames53 Oct 11 '15 at 22:40

Note that exponentiation by squaring is not the most optimal method. It is probably the best you can do as a general method that works for all exponent values, but for a specific exponent value there might be a better sequence that needs fewer multiplications.

For instance, if you want to compute x^15, the method of exponentiation by squaring will give you:

x^15 = (x^7)*(x^7)*x 
x^7 = (x^3)*(x^3)*x 
x^3 = x*x*x

This is a total of 6 multiplications.

It turns out this can be done using "just" 5 multiplications via addition-chain exponentiation.

n*n = n^2
n^2*n = n^3
n^3*n^3 = n^6
n^6*n^6 = n^12
n^12*n^3 = n^15

There are no efficient algorithms to find this optimal sequence of multiplications. From Wikipedia:

The problem of finding the shortest addition chain cannot be solved by dynamic programming, because it does not satisfy the assumption of optimal substructure. That is, it is not sufficient to decompose the power into smaller powers, each of which is computed minimally, since the addition chains for the smaller powers may be related (to share computations). For example, in the shortest addition chain for a¹⁵ above, the subproblem for a⁶ must be computed as (a³)² since a³ is re-used (as opposed to, say, a⁶ = a²(a²)², which also requires three multiplies).

  • 4
    @JeremySalwen: As this answer states, binary exponentiation is not in general the most optimal method. There are no efficient algorithms currently known for finding the minimal sequence of multiplications. – Eric Postpischil Dec 27 '13 at 21:32
  • 2
    @EricPostpischil, That depends on your application. Usually we don't need a general algorithm to work for all numbers. See The Art of Computer Programming, Vol. 2: Seminumerical Algorithms – Pacerier Sep 16 '14 at 9:03
  • 3
    There's a good exposition of this exact problem in From Mathematics to Generic Programming by Alexander Stepanov and Daniel Rose. This book should be on the shelf of every software practitioner, IMHO. – Toby Speight Oct 19 '15 at 10:03
  • 1
    See also en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…. – lhf Apr 14 '16 at 11:27
  • This could be optimized for integers because there are well under 255 integer powers that will not cause overflow for 32 bit integers. You could cache the optimal multiplication structure for each int. I imagine the code+data would still be smaller than simply caching all powers... – Josiah Yoder Aug 17 at 19:25

If you need to raise 2 to a power. The fastest way to do so is to bit shift by the power.

2 ** 3 == 1 << 3 == 8
2 ** 30 == 1 << 30 == 1073741824 (A Gigabyte)
  • Is there an elegant way to do this so that 2 ** 0 == 1 ? – Rob Smallshire Nov 23 '11 at 21:39
  • 15
    2 ** 0 == 1 << 0 == 1 – Jake Dec 30 '11 at 18:22

Here is the method in Java

private int ipow(int base, int exp)
{
    int result = 1;
    while (exp != 0)
    {
        if ((exp & 1) == 1)
            result *= base;
        exp >>= 1;
        base *= base;
    }

    return result;
}
  • does not work for large numbes e.g pow(71045970,41535484) – Anushree Acharjee Jul 10 '15 at 5:26
  • 13
    @AnushreeAcharjee of course not. Computing such a number would require arbitrary precision arithmetic. – David Etler Sep 4 '15 at 21:13
  • Use BigInteger#modPow or Biginteger#pow for big numbers, appropriate algorithms based on size of arguments are already implemented – Raman Yelianevich Nov 24 '15 at 18:15
int pow( int base, int exponent)

{   // Does not work for negative exponents. (But that would be leaving the range of int) 
    if (exponent == 0) return 1;  // base case;
    int temp = pow(base, exponent/2);
    if (exponent % 2 == 0)
        return temp * temp; 
    else
        return (base * temp * temp);
}
  • Not my vote, but pow(1, -1) doesn't leave the range of int despite a negative exponent. Now that one works by accident, as does pow(-1, -1). – MSalters Aug 13 '15 at 9:34
  • The only negative exponent that may not make you leave the range of int is -1. And it only works if base is 1 or -1. So there are only two pairs (base,exp) with exp<0 that would not lead to non integer powers. Although I'm a matematician and I like quantifiers, I think in this case, in practice, it's ok to say that a negative exponent makes you leave the integer realm... – bartgol Aug 15 '17 at 15:15

If you want to get the value of an integer for 2 raised to the power of something it is always better to use the shift option:

pow(2,5) can be replaced by 1<<5

This is much more efficient.

  • 2
    ya but it only works on 2 or multiples of 2. – Pavan Jun 6 '17 at 14:18

An extremely specialized case is, when you need say 2^(-x to the y), where x, is of course is negative and y is too large to do shifting on an int. You can still do 2^x in constant time by screwing with a float.

struct IeeeFloat
{

    unsigned int base : 23;
    unsigned int exponent : 8;
    unsigned int signBit : 1;
};


union IeeeFloatUnion
{
    IeeeFloat brokenOut;
    float f;
};

inline float twoToThe(char exponent)
{
    // notice how the range checking is already done on the exponent var 
    static IeeeFloatUnion u;
    u.f = 2.0;
    // Change the exponent part of the float
    u.brokenOut.exponent += (exponent - 1);
    return (u.f);
}

You can get more powers of 2 by using a double as the base type. (Thanks a lot to commenters for helping to square this post away).

There's also the possibility that learning more about IEEE floats, other special cases of exponentiation might present themselves.

  • Nifty solution, but unsigend?? – paxdiablo Sep 19 '08 at 12:37
  • Yeah, my bad. :) thanks for pointing it out. – Doug T. Sep 19 '08 at 12:39
  • An IEEE float is base x 2 ^ exp, changing the exponent value won't lead to anything else than a multiplication by a power of two, and chances are high it will denormalize the float ... your solution is wrong IMHO – Drealmer Sep 19 '08 at 12:50
  • *= won't work either, exponent can be null – Drealmer Sep 19 '08 at 12:55
  • 3
    Base 10? Uh no, it's base 2, unless you meant 10 in binary :) – Drealmer Sep 19 '08 at 13:02

Just as a follow up to comments on the efficiency of exponentiation by squaring.

The advantage of that approach is that it runs in log(n) time. For example, if you were going to calculate something huge, such as x^1048575 (2^20 - 1), you only have to go thru the loop 20 times, not 1 million+ using the naive approach.

Also, in terms of code complexity, it is simpler than trying to find the most optimal sequence of multiplications, a la Pramod's suggestion.

Edit:

I guess I should clarify before someone tags me for the potential for overflow. This approach assumes that you have some sort of hugeint library.

power() function to work for Integers Only

int power(int base, unsigned int exp){

    if (exp == 0)
        return 1;
    int temp = power(base, exp/2);
    if (exp%2 == 0)
        return temp*temp;
    else
        return base*temp*temp;

}

Complexity = O(log(exp))

power() function to work for negative exp and float base.

float power(float base, int exp) {

    if( exp == 0)
       return 1;
    float temp = power(base, exp/2);       
    if (exp%2 == 0)
        return temp*temp;
    else {
        if(exp > 0)
            return base*temp*temp;
        else
            return (temp*temp)/base; //negative exponent computation 
    }

} 

Complexity = O(log(exp))

  • How is this different from the answers of Abhijit Gaikwad and chux? Please argue the use of float in the second code block presented (consider showing how power(2.0, -3) gets computed). – greybeard Jan 7 '16 at 20:27
  • @greybeard I have mentioned some comment. may be that can resolve your query – roottraveller Jan 8 '16 at 3:34

Late to the party:

Below is a solution that also deals with y < 0 as best as it can.

  1. It uses a result of intmax_t for maximum range. There is no provision for answers that do not fit in intmax_t.
  2. powjii(0, 0) --> 1 which is a common result for this case.
  3. pow(0,negative), another undefined result, returns INTMAX_MAX

    intmax_t powjii(int x, int y) {
      if (y < 0) {
        switch (x) {
          case 0:
            return INTMAX_MAX;
          case 1:
            return 1;
          case -1:
            return y % 2 ? -1 : 1;
        }
        return 0;
      }
      intmax_t z = 1;
      intmax_t base = x;
      for (;;) {
        if (y % 2) {
          z *= base;
        }
        y /= 2;
        if (y == 0) {
          break; 
        }
        base *= base;
      }
      return z;
    }
    

This code uses a forever loop for(;;) to avoid the final base *= base common in other looped solutions. That multiplication is 1) not needed and 2) could be int*int overflow which is UB.

One more implementation (in Java). May not be most efficient solution but # of iterations is same as that of Exponential solution.

public static long pow(long base, long exp){        
    if(exp ==0){
        return 1;
    }
    if(exp ==1){
        return base;
    }

    if(exp % 2 == 0){
        long half = pow(base, exp/2);
        return half * half;
    }else{
        long half = pow(base, (exp -1)/2);
        return base * half * half;
    }       
}

more generic solution considering negative exponenet

private static int pow(int base, int exponent) {

    int result = 1;
    if (exponent == 0)
        return result; // base case;

    if (exponent < 0)
        return 1 / pow(base, -exponent);
    int temp = pow(base, exponent / 2);
    if (exponent % 2 == 0)
        return temp * temp;
    else
        return (base * temp * temp);
}
  • 1
    integer division results in an integer, so your negative exponent could be a lot more efficient since it'll only return 0, 1, or -1... – jswolf19 Aug 29 '14 at 15:51
  • pow(i, INT_MIN) could be an infinite loop. – chux Apr 1 '15 at 16:48
  • 1
    @chux: It could format your harddisk: integer overflow is UB. – MSalters Aug 13 '15 at 9:38
  • @MSalters pow(i, INT_MIN) is not integer overflow. The assignment of that result to temp certainly may overflow, potential causing the end of time, but I'll settle for a seemingly random value. :-) – chux Aug 13 '15 at 14:24

I have implemented algorithm that memorizes all computed powers and then uses them when need. So for example x^13 is equal to (x^2)^2^2 * x^2^2 * x where x^2^2 it taken from the table instead of computing it once again. The number of multiplication needed is Ceil(Log n)

public static int Power(int base, int exp)
{
    int tab[] = new int[exp + 1];
    tab[0] = 1;
    tab[1] = base;
    return Power(base, exp, tab);
}

public static int Power(int base, int exp, int tab[])
    {
         if(exp == 0) return 1;
         if(exp == 1) return base;
         int i = 1;
         while(i < exp/2)
         {  
            if(tab[2 * i] <= 0)
                tab[2 * i] = tab[i] * tab[i];
            i = i << 1;
          }
    if(exp <=  i)
        return tab[i];
     else return tab[i] * Power(base, exp - i, tab);
}

I use recursive, if the exp is even,5^10 =25^5.

int pow(float base,float exp){
   if (exp==0)return 1;
   else if(exp>0&&exp%2==0){
      return pow(base*base,exp/2);
   }else if (exp>0&&exp%2!=0){
      return base*pow(base,exp-1);
   }
}

My case is a little different, I'm trying to create a mask from a power, but I thought I'd share the solution I found anyway.

Obviously, it only works for powers of 2.

Mask1 = 1 << (Exponent - 1);
Mask2 = Mask1 - 1;
return Mask1 + Mask2;
  • This is a bit contrived.... why not result = (1 << Exponent) - 1; ? – Michaël Roy Jun 15 '17 at 16:34
  • I tried that, it doesn't work for 64 bit, it's shifted off never to return, and in this specific case, I'm trying to set all bits lower than X, inclusive. – MarcusJ Jun 16 '17 at 17:04
  • Was that for 1 << 64 ? That's an overflow. The largest integer is just below that: (1 << 64) - 1. – Michaël Roy Jun 16 '17 at 17:06
  • 1 << 64 == 0, that's why. Maybe your representation is best for your app. I prefer stuff that can be put in a macro, without an extra variable, like #define MASK(e) (((e) >= 64) ? -1 :( (1 << (e)) - 1)), so that can be computed at compile time – Michaël Roy Jun 16 '17 at 17:18
  • Yes, i know what an overflow is. Just because i didm't use that word isn't an invitation to be needlessly condescending. As i said, this works for me and it took a bit of effort to discover hence sharing it. It's that simple. – MarcusJ Jun 17 '17 at 23:11

In case you know the exponent (and it is an integer) at compile-time, you can use templates to unroll the loop. This can be made more efficient, but I wanted to demonstrate the basic principle here:

#include <iostream>

template<unsigned long N>
unsigned long inline exp_unroll(unsigned base) {
    return base * exp_unroll<N-1>(base);
}

We terminate the recursion using a template specialization:

template<>
unsigned long inline exp_unroll<1>(unsigned base) {
    return base;
}

The exponent needs to be known at runtime,

int main(int argc, char * argv[]) {
    std::cout << argv[1] <<"**5= " << exp_unroll<5>(atoi(argv[1])) << ;std::endl;
}

Ignoring the special case of 2 raised to a power, the most efficient way is going to be simple iteration.

int pow(int base, int pow) {
  int res = 1;
  for(int i=pow; i<pow; i++)
    res *= base;

  return res;
}

EDIT: As has been pointed out this is not the most efficient way... so long as you define efficiency as cpu cycles which I guess is fair enough.

  • 2
    O(N) where O(log N) is possible - see yarrkov – MSalters Sep 19 '08 at 13:06
  • 1
    This could actually be the most efficient. N can't be arbitrarily large. Its maximum is either 31 or 63 (depending on your int size). Its like how insertion sort beats quicksort for low N. – paperhorse Sep 27 '08 at 22:01
  • This code doesn't work as written, i should be initialized to 0 not pow. @paperhorse, N is pow, ie 0 to INT_MAX. – Greg Rogers Oct 11 '08 at 13:54
  • i=pow; i<pow; i++, i is already intialised to pow and then iterating to pow, the loop will run only once, you should decrement i. isn't it? – Akhil Jain Dec 16 '12 at 5:55
  • @paperhorse: Actually pow(1, INT_MAX) is well-defined. – MSalters Aug 13 '15 at 9:40

protected by Marco A. Jun 20 '15 at 15:45

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