52

I know how to run a shell command in Ruby like:

%x[#{cmd}]

But, how do I specify a directory to run this command?

Is there a similar way of shelling out, similar to subprocess.Popen in Python:

subprocess.Popen(r'c:\mytool\tool.exe', cwd=r'd:\test\local')

Thanks!

123

You can use the block-version of Dir.chdir. Inside the block you are in the requested directory, after the Block you are still in the previous directory:

Dir.chdir('mydir'){
  %x[#{cmd}]
}
  • 4
    +1 It seems that too few Ruby programmers know about this. – Phrogz Apr 13 '12 at 21:10
  • 7
    The things like this that Ruby does with blocks never cease to amaze me. Ruby constantly makes my other languages feel clunky and overcomplicated. – bta Apr 13 '12 at 21:23
  • This is amazing, had I only known of this earlier! – ZirconCode Apr 15 '14 at 18:40
  • 5
    Dir.chdir is ok if you have a single thread. For multiple threads look at the other answers here. – neoneye Jul 29 '14 at 17:59
  • nice, works with jruby too. @neoneye, good point. – akostadinov Aug 26 '14 at 7:30
12

Ruby 1.9.3 (blocking call):

require 'open3'
Open3.popen3("pwd", :chdir=>"/") {|i,o,e,t|
  p o.read.chomp #=> "/"
}

Dir.pwd #=> "/home/abe"
4

also, taking the shell route

%x[cd #{dir} && #{cmd}]
2

The closest I see to backtricks with safe changing dir is capture2:

require 'open3'
output, status = Open3.capture2('pwd', :chdir=>"/tmp")

You can see other useful Open3 methods in ruby docs. One drawback is that jruby support for open3 is rather broken.

  • Using the :chdir option of any Process.spawn-based invokation (system, popen3,...) seems to be thread-safe for launching parallel processes, too. – John Aug 1 '18 at 18:05
1

Maybe it's not the best solution, but try to use Dir.pwd to get the current directory and save it somewhere. After that use Dir.chdir( destination ), where destination is a directory where you want to run your command from. After running the command use Dir.chdir again, using previously saved directory to restore it.

  • 2
    You can also use the block-version of Dir.chdir. Inside the block you are in the requested directory, after the Block you are still in the previous directory. – knut Apr 13 '12 at 20:48
  • @knut You should make that an answer - I like it! I was going to suggest something crazy like Dir.chdir(Dir.pwd.tap {Dir.chdir('d:\test\local'); #otherstuff}) as I wasn't aware chdir could take a block – Abe Voelker Apr 13 '12 at 20:53
  • @AbeVoelker You are right, here it is – knut Apr 13 '12 at 21:08
1

I had this same problem and solved it by putting both commands in back ticks and separating with '&&':

`cd \desired\directory && command`

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