How can I redirect cin to in.txt and cout to out.txt?

up vote 175 down vote accepted

Here is an working example of what you want to do. Read the comments to know what each line in the code does. I've tested it on my pc with gcc 4.6.1; it works fine.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

void f()
{
    std::string line;
    while(std::getline(std::cin, line))  //input from the file in.txt
    {
        std::cout << line << "\n";   //output to the file out.txt
    }
}
int main()
{
    std::ifstream in("in.txt");
    std::streambuf *cinbuf = std::cin.rdbuf(); //save old buf
    std::cin.rdbuf(in.rdbuf()); //redirect std::cin to in.txt!

    std::ofstream out("out.txt");
    std::streambuf *coutbuf = std::cout.rdbuf(); //save old buf
    std::cout.rdbuf(out.rdbuf()); //redirect std::cout to out.txt!

    std::string word;
    std::cin >> word;           //input from the file in.txt
    std::cout << word << "  ";  //output to the file out.txt

    f(); //call function


    std::cin.rdbuf(cinbuf);   //reset to standard input again
    std::cout.rdbuf(coutbuf); //reset to standard output again

    std::cin >> word;   //input from the standard input
    std::cout << word;  //output to the standard input
}

You could save and redirect in just one line as:

auto cinbuf = std::cin.rdbuf(in.rdbuf()); //save and redirect

Here std::cin.rdbuf(in.rdbuf()) sets std::cin's buffer to in.rdbuf() and then returns the old buffer associated with std::cin. The very same can be done with std::cout — or any stream for that matter.

Hope that helps.

  • 4
    Do I need to close the files before I reset cin and cout to standard IO? – updogliu Apr 15 '12 at 7:10
  • 3
    @updogliu: No. If you want, you can use in and out to read from and write to, in.txt and out.txt respectively. Also, the files will be closed automatically when in and out go out of scope. – Nawaz Apr 15 '12 at 8:44
  • I like this solution over the freopen one because I can no longer get my stdout back if I use freopen. stackoverflow.com/questions/26699524/… – xxks-kkk Oct 20 at 5:30

Just write

#include <cstdio>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    freopen("output.txt","w",stdout);
    cout<<"write in file";
    return 0;
}
  • 13
    That is redirecting stdout, not cout. – updogliu Dec 26 '14 at 13:54
  • 4
    This will redirect printf too, which in some cases may be a good thing. – JDiMatteo Feb 25 '15 at 22:27
  • 1
    @updogliu as far as my knowledge goes, stdout and cout are in sync all the time – Akshay L Aradhya Mar 5 '16 at 11:46
  • 4
    @AkshayLAradhya Not when you set std::sync_with_studio(false);, although by default it is set to true. – vsoftco Oct 28 '16 at 4:01
  • 1
    If the answers were equal in functionality, the C++ equivalent of this would be ofstream out("out.txt"); cout.rdbuf(out.rdbuf()); - only one extra line, and it's portable. Not soooo much simpler :) – nevelis Jul 19 '17 at 3:03

assuming your compiles prog name is x.exe and $ is the system shell or prompt

$ x <infile >outfile 

will take input from infile and will output to outfile .

Here is a short code snippet for shadowing cin/cout useful for programming contests:

#include <bits/stdc++.h>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    ifstream cin("input.txt");
    ofstream cout("output.txt");

    int a, b;   
    cin >> a >> b;
    cout << a + b << endl;
}

This gives additional benefit that plain fstreams are faster than synced stdio streams. But this works only for the scope of single function.

Global cin/cout redirect can be written as:

#include <bits/stdc++.h>

using namespace std;

void func() {
    int a, b;
    std::cin >> a >> b;
    std::cout << a + b << endl;
}

int main() {
    ifstream cin("input.txt");
    ofstream cout("output.txt");

    // optional performance optimizations    
    ios_base::sync_with_stdio(false);
    std::cin.tie(0);

    std::cin.rdbuf(cin.rdbuf());
    std::cout.rdbuf(cout.rdbuf());

    func();
}

Note that ios_base::sync_with_stdio also resets std::cin.rdbuf. So the order matters.

See also Significance of ios_base::sync_with_stdio(false); cin.tie(NULL);

Std io streams can also be easily shadowed for the scope of single file, which is useful for competitive programming:

#include <bits/stdc++.h>

using std::endl;

std::ifstream cin("input.txt");
std::ofstream cout("output.txt");

int a, b;

void read() {
    cin >> a >> b;
}

void write() {
    cout << a + b << endl;
}

int main() {
    read();
    write();
}

But in this case we have to pick std declarations one by one and avoid using namespace std; as it would give ambiguity error:

error: reference to 'cin' is ambiguous
     cin >> a >> b;
     ^
note: candidates are: 
std::ifstream cin
    ifstream cin("input.txt");
             ^
    In file test.cpp
std::istream std::cin
    extern istream cin;  /// Linked to standard input
                   ^

See also How do you properly use namespaces in C++?, Why is "using namespace std" considered bad practice? and How to resolve a name collision between a C++ namespace and a global function?

Try this to redirect cout to file.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

int main()
{
    /** backup cout buffer and redirect to out.txt **/
    std::ofstream out("out.txt");

    auto *coutbuf = std::cout.rdbuf();
    std::cout.rdbuf(out.rdbuf());

    std::cout << "This will be redirected to file out.txt" << std::endl;

    /** reset cout buffer **/
    std::cout.rdbuf(coutbuf);

    std::cout << "This will be printed on console" << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Read full article Use std::rdbuf to Redirect cin and cout

  • The question had been answered almost 6 years back (in 2012), yet you've added an answer now in 2018. Your answer is same as the accepted answer. So I'm wondering why did you post this when you didn't have anything new to add? – Nawaz Jun 19 at 7:57
  • My answer highlight only cout version specially and the detailed answer is provided in the link below. – HaSeeB MiR Jun 21 at 6:20
  • What is new in your answer which is not present in the accepted answer? – Nawaz Jun 21 at 8:31
  • My answer doesn’t mix redirection of both cout and cin , my version separates to make it more readable – HaSeeB MiR Jun 21 at 12:45

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