177

How can I redirect cin to in.txt and cout to out.txt?

1

8 Answers 8

264

Here is an working example of what you want to do. Read the comments to know what each line in the code does. I've tested it on my pc with gcc 4.6.1; it works fine.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

void f()
{
    std::string line;
    while(std::getline(std::cin, line))  //input from the file in.txt
    {
        std::cout << line << "\n";   //output to the file out.txt
    }
}
int main()
{
    std::ifstream in("in.txt");
    std::streambuf *cinbuf = std::cin.rdbuf(); //save old buf
    std::cin.rdbuf(in.rdbuf()); //redirect std::cin to in.txt!

    std::ofstream out("out.txt");
    std::streambuf *coutbuf = std::cout.rdbuf(); //save old buf
    std::cout.rdbuf(out.rdbuf()); //redirect std::cout to out.txt!

    std::string word;
    std::cin >> word;           //input from the file in.txt
    std::cout << word << "  ";  //output to the file out.txt

    f(); //call function


    std::cin.rdbuf(cinbuf);   //reset to standard input again
    std::cout.rdbuf(coutbuf); //reset to standard output again

    std::cin >> word;   //input from the standard input
    std::cout << word;  //output to the standard input
}

You could save and redirect in just one line as:

auto cinbuf = std::cin.rdbuf(in.rdbuf()); //save and redirect

Here std::cin.rdbuf(in.rdbuf()) sets std::cin's buffer to in.rdbuf() and then returns the old buffer associated with std::cin. The very same can be done with std::cout — or any stream for that matter.

Hope that helps.

4
  • 5
    Do I need to close the files before I reset cin and cout to standard IO?
    – updogliu
    Apr 15, 2012 at 7:10
  • 4
    @updogliu: No. If you want, you can use in and out to read from and write to, in.txt and out.txt respectively. Also, the files will be closed automatically when in and out go out of scope.
    – Nawaz
    Apr 15, 2012 at 8:44
  • 1
    I like this solution over the freopen one because I can no longer get my stdout back if I use freopen. stackoverflow.com/questions/26699524/…
    – xxks-kkk
    Oct 20, 2018 at 5:30
  • What if I don't want to keep the old buf from cin or cout around? Should I delete them?
    – Kai Petzke
    Feb 17 at 20:30
99

Just write

#include <cstdio>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    freopen("output.txt","w",stdout);
    cout<<"write in file";
    return 0;
}
8
  • 5
    This will redirect printf too, which in some cases may be a good thing.
    – JDiMatteo
    Feb 25, 2015 at 22:27
  • 6
    @AkshayLAradhya Not when you set std::sync_with_studio(false);, although by default it is set to true.
    – vsoftco
    Oct 28, 2016 at 4:01
  • 2
    @PřemyslŠťastný why? Apr 3, 2017 at 18:40
  • 4
    If the answers were equal in functionality, the C++ equivalent of this would be ofstream out("out.txt"); cout.rdbuf(out.rdbuf()); - only one extra line, and it's portable. Not soooo much simpler :)
    – nevelis
    Jul 19, 2017 at 3:03
  • 2
    @nevelis Fair enough, you're right. I guess it depends on whether you need it to be portable or not. The reason I was looking this up was for testing coding challenge problems so I just wanted a quick and easy answer. Obviously that's a very different need than someone writing production code. Jul 20, 2017 at 17:49
30

Here is a short code snippet for shadowing cin/cout useful for programming contests:

#include <bits/stdc++.h>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    ifstream cin("input.txt");
    ofstream cout("output.txt");

    int a, b;   
    cin >> a >> b;
    cout << a + b << endl;
}

This gives additional benefit that plain fstreams are faster than synced stdio streams. But this works only for the scope of single function.

Global cin/cout redirect can be written as:

#include <bits/stdc++.h>

using namespace std;

void func() {
    int a, b;
    std::cin >> a >> b;
    std::cout << a + b << endl;
}

int main() {
    ifstream cin("input.txt");
    ofstream cout("output.txt");

    // optional performance optimizations    
    ios_base::sync_with_stdio(false);
    std::cin.tie(0);

    std::cin.rdbuf(cin.rdbuf());
    std::cout.rdbuf(cout.rdbuf());

    func();
}

Note that ios_base::sync_with_stdio also resets std::cin.rdbuf. So the order matters.

See also Significance of ios_base::sync_with_stdio(false); cin.tie(NULL);

Std io streams can also be easily shadowed for the scope of single file, which is useful for competitive programming:

#include <bits/stdc++.h>

using std::endl;

std::ifstream cin("input.txt");
std::ofstream cout("output.txt");

int a, b;

void read() {
    cin >> a >> b;
}

void write() {
    cout << a + b << endl;
}

int main() {
    read();
    write();
}

But in this case we have to pick std declarations one by one and avoid using namespace std; as it would give ambiguity error:

error: reference to 'cin' is ambiguous
     cin >> a >> b;
     ^
note: candidates are: 
std::ifstream cin
    ifstream cin("input.txt");
             ^
    In file test.cpp
std::istream std::cin
    extern istream cin;  /// Linked to standard input
                   ^

See also How do you properly use namespaces in C++?, Why is "using namespace std" considered bad practice? and How to resolve a name collision between a C++ namespace and a global function?

14

assuming your compiles prog name is x.exe and $ is the system shell or prompt

$ x <infile >outfile 

will take input from infile and will output to outfile .

1
  • 2
    That is not C++ related and fails in any non-trivial example, for example when your program spawns child processes that write to the console. At least that's the problem I've encountered when I tried such redirection, hence why I'm here.
    – ashrasmun
    Mar 22, 2019 at 5:23
9

Try this to redirect cout to file.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

int main()
{
    /** backup cout buffer and redirect to out.txt **/
    std::ofstream out("out.txt");

    auto *coutbuf = std::cout.rdbuf();
    std::cout.rdbuf(out.rdbuf());

    std::cout << "This will be redirected to file out.txt" << std::endl;

    /** reset cout buffer **/
    std::cout.rdbuf(coutbuf);

    std::cout << "This will be printed on console" << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Read full article Use std::rdbuf to Redirect cin and cout

5
  • 4
    The question had been answered almost 6 years back (in 2012), yet you've added an answer now in 2018. Your answer is same as the accepted answer. So I'm wondering why did you post this when you didn't have anything new to add?
    – Nawaz
    Jun 19, 2018 at 7:57
  • My answer highlight only cout version specially and the detailed answer is provided in the link below.
    – Haseeb Mir
    Jun 21, 2018 at 6:20
  • 3
    What is new in your answer which is not present in the accepted answer?
    – Nawaz
    Jun 21, 2018 at 8:31
  • 3
    My answer doesn’t mix redirection of both cout and cin , my version separates to make it more readable
    – Haseeb Mir
    Jun 21, 2018 at 12:45
  • @HaseeBMir But the question was how to redirect cin AND cout. And sorry, most programmers will be able to strip that half of the accepted answer, that they don't need, if they redirect only cin or only cout.
    – Kai Petzke
    Feb 17 at 20:34
1

The accepted answer shows the right way to redirect cin and cout. You need to construct another stream object whose life time exceeds that of cin or cout. If you want to write a function works like freopen, you can alloc an array for each stream to be redirected, to save the allocated stream objects.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

template<typename>
    struct fstream_traits { };
template<typename CharT, typename Traits>
    struct fstream_traits<basic_istream<CharT, Traits>> { using type = basic_ifstream<CharT, Traits>; };
template<typename CharT, typename Traits>
    struct fstream_traits<basic_ostream<CharT, Traits>> { using type = basic_ofstream<CharT, Traits>; };

template <typename Stream>
void redirect(Stream& str, string filename)
{
    using fstream_type = typename fstream_traits<Stream>::type;
    static int index = std::ios_base::xalloc();
    if (str.pword(index) == nullptr)
    {
        str.pword(index)= new vector<ios_base*>{};
        str.register_callback([](ios_base::event event, std::ios_base& stream, int index) {
            if (event == ios_base::erase_event)
            {
                for (auto fs : *(vector<ios_base*>*)stream.pword(index))
                    delete fs;
                delete (vector<ios_base*>*)stream.pword(index);
            }
        }, index);
    }
    vector<ios_base*>* list = (vector<ios_base*>*)str.pword(index);
    list->push_back(new fstream_type{filename});
    str.rdbuf(dynamic_cast<fstream_type*>(list->back())->rdbuf())->~basic_streambuf();
}

int main()
{
    redirect(cout, "out.txt");
    cout << "Redirected text!";
    return 0;
}

The template and alias are not required if you explicitly use istream/ostream instead of Stream.

0

If your input file is in.txt, you can use freopen to set stdin file as in.txt

freopen("in.txt","r",stdin);

if you want to do the same with your output:

freopen("out.txt","w",stdout);

this will work for std::cin (if using c++), printf, etc...

This will also help you in debugging your code in clion, vscode

Edit
If you want to reset stdin

fclose(stdin);
stdin = fdopen(0, "r"); //reopen: 0 is file descriptor of std input

and to reset stdout

fclose(stdout);
stdout = fdopen(1, "w"); //reopen: 1 is file descriptor of std output
2
  • How do you reset stdout in that case?
    – ex1led
    Mar 15, 2021 at 11:23
  • @Broxigar Edited to add info about resetting Mar 18, 2021 at 9:47
0

I/O Redirection in C++

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/io-redirection-c/

// Cpp program to redirect cout to a file
#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
 
using namespace std;
 
int main()
{
    fstream file;
    file.open("cout.txt", ios::out);
    string line;
 
    // Backup streambuffers of  cout
    streambuf* stream_buffer_cout = cout.rdbuf();
    streambuf* stream_buffer_cin = cin.rdbuf();
 
    // Get the streambuffer of the file
    streambuf* stream_buffer_file = file.rdbuf();
 
    // Redirect cout to file
    cout.rdbuf(stream_buffer_file);
 
    cout << "This line written to file" << endl;
 
    // Redirect cout back to screen
    cout.rdbuf(stream_buffer_cout);
    cout << "This line is written to screen" << endl;
 
    file.close();
    return 0;
}
1
  • 1
    Hello and welcome to Stackoverflow. You have answered a very old question with many answers. Please edit your question and add an explanation why this answer is better than the others May 31, 2021 at 9:42

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