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I need to make a conditional that is true if a particular matching text is found at least once in a string of text, e.g.:

str = "This is some text containing the word tiger."
if string.match(str, "tiger") then
    print ("The word tiger was found.")
else
    print ("The word tiger was not found.")

How can I check if the text is found somewhere in the string?

0

1 Answer 1

124

There are 2 options to find matching text; string.match or string.find.

Both of these perform a regex search on the string to find matches.


string.find()

string.find(subject string, pattern string, optional start position, optional plain flag)

Returns the startIndex & endIndex of the substring found.

The plain flag allows for the pattern to be ignored and intead be interpreted as a literal. Rather than (tiger) being interpreted as a regex capture group matching for tiger, it instead looks for (tiger) within a string.

Going the other way, if you want to regex match but still want literal special characters (such as .()[]+- etc.), you can escape them with a percentage; %(tiger%).

You will likely use this in combination with string.sub

Example

str = "This is some text containing the word tiger."
if string.find(str, "tiger") then
  print ("The word tiger was found.")
else
  print ("The word tiger was not found.")
end

string.match()

string.match(s, pattern, optional index)

Returns the capture groups found.

Example

str = "This is some text containing the word tiger."
if string.match(str, "tiger") then
  print ("The word tiger was found.")
else
  print ("The word tiger was not found.")
end
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  • 7
    or, using the syntax sugar str:find("tiger") Apr 11, 2017 at 12:58
  • 7
    This works for the trivial example "tiger", but there are many possible search strings that would be interpreted as a pattern rather than a literal string and break the code. Please consider updating the example above to support the search string "tiger(". Aug 6, 2017 at 19:17
  • @NathanWiebe You are correct. Since this appears to be a widely popular answer for this, I've added a section for the same. Feel free to expand it further :)
    – hjpotter92
    Aug 7, 2017 at 0:20
  • 4
    Escaping pattern-match characters still doesn't handle the case of an arbitrary search string - one that is truly arbitrary (not hard-coded) and may or may not contain special characters that you have no way of escaping. Ideally the answer should refer readers to the optional fourth parameter which can disable the pattern search. e.g. string.find(myArbitraryString, myArbitrarySearchString, 1, true), which would work for any value of myArbitrarySearchString that may be encountered at runtime, including the value "tiger(". Aug 8, 2017 at 3:42
  • 3
    @NathanWiebe string.find() has a fourth argument plain, which, when set to true, makes the second argument be treated as a plain string. While ('aa+bb'):find('a+b') returns nil (no match), ('aa+bb'):find('a+b', 1, true) returns 2, 4 (a match is found). Jun 12, 2020 at 21:47

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