273

I have an app that runs on the iPhone and iPod Touch, it can run on the Retina iPad and everything but there needs to be one adjustment. I need to detect if the current device is an iPad. What code can I use to detect if the user is using an iPad in my UIViewController and then change something accordingly?

0

17 Answers 17

600

There are quite a few ways to check if a device is an iPad. This is my favorite way to check whether the device is in fact an iPad:

if ( UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPad )
{
    return YES; /* Device is iPad */
}

The way I use it

#define IDIOM    UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM()
#define IPAD     UIUserInterfaceIdiomPad

if ( IDIOM == IPAD ) {
    /* do something specifically for iPad. */
} else {
    /* do something specifically for iPhone or iPod touch. */
}   

Other Examples

if ( [(NSString*)[UIDevice currentDevice].model hasPrefix:@"iPad"] ) {
    return YES; /* Device is iPad */
}

#define IPAD     (UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPad)
if ( IPAD ) 
     return YES;

For a Swift solution, see this answer: https://stackoverflow.com/a/27517536/2057171

9
  • 24
    The way you use it isn't as efficient as it could be. UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() is equivalent to ([[UIDevice currentDevice] respondsToSelector:@selector(userInterfaceIdiom)] ? [[UIDevice currentDevice] userInterfaceIdiom] : UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone). You might be better off caching the result somewhere: BOOL iPad = UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPad; … if (iPad) …. – Marcelo Cantos Feb 16 '13 at 0:04
  • 7
    I would use hasPrefix rather than isEqualToString in your last method. In this way the code works on the simulator as well. – elbuild Sep 27 '13 at 11:00
  • 19
    Swift: if UIDevice.currentDevice().userInterfaceIdiom == .Pad – Pang Aug 9 '14 at 4:30
  • 2
    Godawful use of macros. Great way to obfuscate your code. – gnasher729 Dec 1 '17 at 22:44
  • 3
    @gnasher729 500+ people tend to disagree with you. Instead of the snarky comments, why don't you provide your own answer since you think you have a better way to do this. – WrightsCS Dec 2 '17 at 2:38
174

In Swift you can use the following equalities to determine the kind of device on Universal apps:

UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .phone
// or
UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .pad

Usage would then be something like:

if UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .pad {
    // Available Idioms - .pad, .phone, .tv, .carPlay, .unspecified
    // Implement your logic here
}
5
  • 3
    I'm Editing a link to your answer into the accepted answer. (This way you get credit too). Even though this is an objective-c question, alot of people viewing this question are coming from Google and may be searching for a Swift solution! :D – Albert Renshaw Dec 17 '14 at 5:49
  • 1
    Thank you, @AlbertRenshaw. I thought so, too. :) Btw: I don't think the intention of the question was to ask specifically for Objective-C, but for iOS (which was Obj-C at that moment). At least I would have expected to find the answer under this question for Swift as well. – Jeehut Dec 17 '14 at 15:43
  • Hi @sevensevens, thank you for your feedback. I just tried this out and it did work for me in XCode 7.2 targeting iOS 9 in the simulator. What version of XCode are you using? Maybe it doesn't work on older XCodes? The docs say userInterfaceIdiom is 'Available in iOS 3.2 and later.' so that shouldn't be the problem. – Jeehut Dec 26 '15 at 10:16
  • Or could it be that you are running an iPhone only app on the iPad simulator? In that case, that would explain the confusion – but it should also behave this way on real devices, I think. As @Yunus Nedim Mehel points out in the comments of @Richards answer that situation will return .Phone instead of .Pad. – Jeehut Dec 26 '15 at 10:20
  • Sorry - had the simulator set to iPhone. Gotta stop making changes at 2AM – sevensevens Dec 26 '15 at 14:38
35

This is part of UIDevice as of iOS 3.2, e.g.:

[UIDevice currentDevice].userInterfaceIdiom == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPad
1
  • 4
    idiom is generally better but if you are running an iphone app on iPad than this will return UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone. – Yunus Nedim Mehel Dec 18 '13 at 17:05
25

You can also use this

#define IPAD UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPad
...
if (IPAD) {
   // iPad
} else {
   // iPhone / iPod Touch
}
0
24

UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() only returns iPad if the app is for iPad or Universal. If its an iPhone app running on an iPad then it won't. So you should instead check the model.

0
16

Be Careful: If your app is targeting iPhone device only, iPad running with iphone compatible mode will return false for below statement:

#define IPAD     UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPad

The right way to detect physical iPad device is:

#define IS_IPAD_DEVICE      ([(NSString *)[UIDevice currentDevice].model hasPrefix:@"iPad"])
15

I found that some solution didn't work for me in the Simulator within Xcode. Instead, this works:

ObjC

NSString *deviceModel = (NSString*)[UIDevice currentDevice].model;

if ([[deviceModel substringWithRange:NSMakeRange(0, 4)] isEqualToString:@"iPad"]) {
    DebugLog(@"iPad");
} else {
    DebugLog(@"iPhone or iPod Touch");
}

Swift

if UIDevice.current.model.hasPrefix("iPad") {
    print("iPad")
} else {
    print("iPhone or iPod Touch")
}

Also in the 'Other Examples' in Xcode the device model comes back as 'iPad Simulator' so the above tweak should sort that out.

1
  • Maybe Apple updated the simulator to say something like "iPad simulator" or "iPad 2.1" or something... if that's the case you could use hasSuffix:@"iPad" instead of isEqualToString@"iPad"... your best bet is to Log the device model that simulator does return and go from there... – Albert Renshaw Nov 14 '12 at 21:31
9

Many Answers are good but I use like this in swift 4

  1. Create Constant

    struct App {
        static let isRunningOnIpad = UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .pad ? true : false
    }
    
  2. Use like this

    if App.isRunningOnIpad {
        return load(from: .main, identifier: identifier)
    } else {
        return load(from: .ipad, identifier: identifier)
    }
    

Edit: As Suggested Cœur simply create an extension on UIDevice

extension UIDevice {
    static let isRunningOnIpad = UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .pad ? true : false
}
1
  • 3
    Why bothering with an App struct when you can do the same with an UIDevice extension? – Cœur Feb 6 '18 at 4:19
8

Many ways to do that in Swift:

We check the model below (we can only do a case sensitive search here):

class func isUserUsingAnIpad() -> Bool {
    let deviceModel = UIDevice.currentDevice().model
    let result: Bool = NSString(string: deviceModel).containsString("iPad")
    return result
}

We check the model below (we can do a case sensitive/insensitive search here):

    class func isUserUsingAnIpad() -> Bool {
        let deviceModel = UIDevice.currentDevice().model
        let deviceModelNumberOfCharacters: Int = count(deviceModel)
        if deviceModel.rangeOfString("iPad",
                                     options: NSStringCompareOptions.LiteralSearch,
                                     range: Range<String.Index>(start: deviceModel.startIndex,
                                                                end: advance(deviceModel.startIndex, deviceModelNumberOfCharacters)),
                                     locale: nil) != nil {
            return true
        } else {
            return false
        }
   }

UIDevice.currentDevice().userInterfaceIdiom below only returns iPad if the app is for iPad or Universal. If it is an iPhone app being ran on an iPad then it won't. So you should instead check the model. :

    class func isUserUsingAnIpad() -> Bool {
        if UIDevice.currentDevice().userInterfaceIdiom == UIUserInterfaceIdiom.Pad {
            return true
        } else {
            return false
        }
   }

This snippet below does not compile if the class does not inherit of an UIViewController, otherwise it works just fine. Regardless UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() only returns iPad if the app is for iPad or Universal. If it is an iPhone app being ran on an iPad then it won't. So you should instead check the model. :

class func isUserUsingAnIpad() -> Bool {
    if (UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() == UIUserInterfaceIdiom.Pad) {
        return true
    } else {
        return false
    }
}
4
  • 2
    I don't think there's a need to rewrite old answers to questions tagged Objective-C to swift. – Christian Schnorr Jul 2 '15 at 14:07
  • 4
    I definitely think that my answer is useful because firstly all answers are scattered on stack overflow. Secondly what worked with older versions of iOS does not correctly work sometimes with iOS 8 and above. So I tested these solutions and this answer can be highly useful. So I do not agree with you at all. – King-Wizard Jul 2 '15 at 18:02
  • On top of that the syntax is different in Swift. So it is always useful for everybody to do an intelligent copy paste of the answer and understanding the specific up-to-date nuts and bolts. – King-Wizard Jul 2 '15 at 18:05
8

*

In swift 3.0

*

 if UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .pad {
        //pad
    } else if UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .phone {
        //phone
    } else if UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .tv {
        //tv
    } else if UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .carPlay {
        //CarDisplay
    } else {
        //unspecified
    }
4

In Swift 4.2 and Xcode 10

if UIDevice().userInterfaceIdiom == .phone {
    //This is iPhone
} else if UIDevice().userInterfaceIdiom == .pad { 
    //This is iPad
} else if UIDevice().userInterfaceIdiom == .tv {
    //This is Apple TV
}

If you want to detect specific device

let screenHeight = UIScreen.main.bounds.size.height
if UIDevice().userInterfaceIdiom == .phone {
    if (screenHeight >= 667) {
        print("iPhone 6 and later")
    } else if (screenHeight == 568) {
        print("SE, 5C, 5S")
    } else if(screenHeight<=480){
        print("4S")
    }
} else if UIDevice().userInterfaceIdiom == .pad { 
    //This is iPad
}
3

You can check the rangeOfString to see of the word iPad exists like this.

NSString *deviceModel = (NSString*)[UIDevice currentDevice].model;

if ([deviceModel rangeOfString:@"iPad"].location != NSNotFound)  {
NSLog(@"I am an iPad");
} else {
NSLog(@"I am not an iPad");
}
1
  • ["I am not an iPad" rangeOfString:@"iPad"].location != NSNotFound returns true. – Cœur Feb 6 '18 at 4:13
2

Yet another Swifty way:

//MARK: -  Device Check
let iPad = UIUserInterfaceIdiom.Pad
let iPhone = UIUserInterfaceIdiom.Phone
@available(iOS 9.0, *) /* AppleTV check is iOS9+ */
let TV = UIUserInterfaceIdiom.TV

extension UIDevice {
    static var type: UIUserInterfaceIdiom 
        { return UIDevice.currentDevice().userInterfaceIdiom }
}

Usage:

if UIDevice.type == iPhone {
    //it's an iPhone!
}

if UIDevice.type == iPad {
    //it's an iPad!
}

if UIDevice.type == TV {
    //it's an TV!
}
0
1

Why so complicated? This is how I do it...

Swift 4:

var iPad : Bool {
    return UIDevice.current.model.contains("iPad")
}

This way you can just say if iPad {}

1
  • 1
    Note: This question was asked in 2012 – Albert Renshaw Sep 20 '17 at 23:01
1

I don't think any of these answers meet my need, unless I am fundamentally misunderstanding something.

I have an app (originally an iPad app) that I want to run both on an iPad and on the Mac, under Catalyst. I'm using the plist option to scale the Mac interface to match the iPad, but would like to migrate to AppKit if that is reasonable. When running on a Mac, I believe that all of the aforementioned approaches tell me that I'm on an iPad. The Catalyst fake-out is pretty thorough.

For most concerns I indeed understand that the code should pretend it's on an iPad when thus running on a Mac. One exception is that the rolling picker is not available on the Mac under Catalyst, but is on the iPad. I want to figure out whether to create a UIPickerView or to do something different, at run time. Run-time selection is crucial because I want to use a single binary to run both on the iPad and Mac in the long term, while making the best use of the supported UI standards on each.

The APIs give potentially misleading results to the casual pre-Catalyst reader. For example, [UIDevice currentDevice].model returns @"iPad" when running under Catalyst on a Mac. The user interface idiom APIs sustain the same illusion.

I found that you really need to look deeper. I start with this information:

NSString *const deviceModel = [UIDevice currentDevice].model;
NSProcessInfo *const processInfo = [[NSProcessInfo alloc] init];
const bool isIosAppOnMac = processInfo.iOSAppOnMac;  // Note: this will be "no" under Catalyst
const bool isCatalystApp = processInfo.macCatalystApp;

Then you can combine these queries with expressions like [deviceModel hasPrefix: @"iPad"] to sort out the kinds of subtleties I'm facing. For my case, I explicitly want to avoid making a UIPickerView if the indicated isCatalystApp is true, independent of "misleading" information about the interface idiom, or the illusions sustained by isIosAppOnMac and deviceModel.

Now I'm curious what happens if I move the Mac app to run over on my iPad sidecar...

1
  • 1
    What an oversight by apple! I wonder if it’s a bug? Thanks for sharing – Albert Renshaw Dec 6 '20 at 18:20
0

For the latest versions of iOS, simply add UITraitCollection:

extension UITraitCollection {

    var isIpad: Bool {
        return horizontalSizeClass == .regular && verticalSizeClass == .regular
    }
}

and then within UIViewController just check:

if traitCollection.isIpad { ... }
1
  • 4
    Does this also work when the iPad-App is in Split Screen Mode? Then the horizontal size class would be compact. – Oliver Jun 27 '17 at 5:28
0
if(UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM () == UIUserInterfaceIdiom.pad)
 {
            print("This is iPad")
 }else if (UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM () == UIUserInterfaceIdiom.phone)
 {
            print("This is iPhone");
  }

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.