104

I am saving some data in order using arrays, and I want to add a function that the user can reverse the list. I can't think of any possible method, so if anybody knows how, please help.

1
  • 2
    @jbabey "try google next time?" Stackoverflow is not a place for rudeness. Mar 26, 2022 at 18:42

38 Answers 38

193

Javascript has a reverse() method that you can call in an array

var a = [3,5,7,8];
a.reverse(); // 8 7 5 3

Not sure if that's what you mean by 'libraries you can't use', I'm guessing something to do with practice. If that's the case, you can implement your own version of .reverse()

function reverseArr(input) {
    var ret = new Array;
    for(var i = input.length-1; i >= 0; i--) {
        ret.push(input[i]);
    }
    return ret;
}

var a = [3,5,7,8]
var b = reverseArr(a);

Do note that the built-in .reverse() method operates on the original array, thus you don't need to reassign a.

2
  • 1
    use [...arr].reverse() for undestructive reversing Sep 14, 2020 at 18:02
  • const b = a.toReversed(); returns a new array with the original in tact Oct 24, 2023 at 18:32
62

Array.prototype.reverse() is all you need to do this work. See compatibility table.

var myArray = [20, 40, 80, 100];
var revMyArr = [].concat(myArray).reverse();
console.log(revMyArr);
// [100, 80, 40, 20]

2
  • 11
    nice, non-destructive
    – Larry
    Sep 27, 2016 at 12:24
  • 4
    It should be noted that concat copies object references into the new array. Both the original and new array refer to the same object... Jul 17, 2017 at 13:42
31

Heres a functional way to do it.

const array = [1,2,3,4,5,6,"taco"];

function reverse(array){
  return array.map((item,idx) => array[array.length-1-idx])
}
2
  • 3
    Great and short solution if u don't want to change orig array!
    – DNLST
    Jun 11, 2019 at 21:45
  • 2
    This is great if you are writing a pure function or don't want to mutate the original array for any other reason. Aug 9, 2019 at 9:56
24

20 bytes

let reverse=a=>[...a].map(a.pop,a)
8
  • 5
    @user169320 [...a] clones the array, .map(a.pop, a) pops the array (returns the last element of the array) and push it to a new array, which results in a reversed array. Feb 23, 2018 at 18:43
  • 3
    ...and the 2nd argument to map makes sure that pop is executed with a as this, like as if you would have done a.pop()
    – trincot
    Jun 20, 2018 at 15:06
  • 2
    When you pass on a function reference (so without executing it), which is later used for execution, then that function reference has no trace at all of the object you want to have it executed on: it is just a plain function. In the above code you might as well have put [].pop instead of a.pop: it would be exactly the same function. When the implementation of map executes that function, it does not know on which array it should be executed. And if you don't tell that, it will fail. The second argument to map gives the necessary info to map.
    – trincot
    Aug 13, 2018 at 11:27
  • 2
    is it CodeGolf ?
    – user9258013
    Jan 17, 2019 at 8:48
  • 2
    Quite clever but bear in mind that this will mutate your original array making it empty (use a deep-freeze before, maybe) Dec 16, 2019 at 5:48
20
const original = [1, 2, 3, 4];
const reversed = [...original].reverse(); // 4 3 2 1

Concise and leaves the original unchanged.

2
  • very useful , you are fade out my issues on reverse state Jan 13, 2022 at 12:46
  • 2
    Just lost half a day due to not realizing this was an in-place operation. Thank you for the help!
    – Greg
    Apr 19, 2022 at 0:50
12
reveresed = [...array].reverse()
10

The shortest reverse method I've seen is this one:

let reverse = a=>a.sort(a=>1)
4
  • 4
    Doesn’t this depend on how the sorting is implemented? Since the comparing function isn’t consistent (i.e. it always returns 1) the behavior is undefined. Jun 8, 2018 at 21:04
  • Actually I was surprised to see it work the way it did. [1,2,3,4].sort(a=>1) returns the correct answer for example. The idea is that it closely tied to how the sort method can take a sorting algorithm and since it does it one by one, it's always swaps.
    – Elia Grady
    Jun 10, 2018 at 19:47
  • The problem with this is that it might not reverse the array with different interpreters. Jun 10, 2018 at 20:49
  • 1
    I'm not suggesting this as a good practice, just thought it's an interesting, unconventional take on a well known operation.
    – Elia Grady
    Jun 12, 2018 at 14:37
7

This is what you want:

array.reverse();

DEMO

1
  • 4
    Note that array.reverse() will change the order of elements on the original array.
    – thexpand
    Aug 1, 2016 at 5:44
7

two ways:

  1. counter loop

    function reverseArray(a) { 
         var rA = []
         for (var i = a.length; i > 0; i--) {
             rA.push(a[i - 1])
         } 
    
         return rA;
      }
    
  2. Using .reverse()

     function reverseArray(a) {  
         return a.reverse()  
      }
    
6

53 bytes

function reverse(a){
    for(i=0,j=a.length-1;i<j;)a[i]=a[j]+(a[j--]=a[i++],0)
}

Just for fun, here's an alternative implementation that is faster than the native .reverse method.

1
  • I always look for that diamond in the rough where the solution is simple, compatible, and concise. You won this question for me, in this case. May you please explain it in detail? Oct 12, 2022 at 4:47
6

You can do

var yourArray = ["first", "second", "third", "...", "etc"]
var reverseArray = yourArray.slice().reverse()

console.log(reverseArray)

You will get

["etc", "...", "third", "second", "first"]
1
  • A good non-destructive solution. Note that slice does a shallow copy.
    – xy2
    Mar 23, 2021 at 21:15
6

**

Shortest reverse array method without using reverse method:

**

 var a = [0, 1, 4, 1, 3, 9, 3, 7, 8544, 4, 2, 1, 2, 3];

 a.map(a.pop,[...a]); 
// returns [3, 2, 1, 2, 4, 8544, 7, 3, 9, 3, 1, 4, 1, 0]

a.pop method takes an last element off and puts upfront with spread operator ()

MDN links for reference:

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/Spread_syntax

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/map

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/pop

1
  • Same as Torkel Velure 's answer [...a].map(a.pop,a)
    – QuentinUK
    Mar 1, 2020 at 0:44
5

Here is a version which does not require temp array.

function inplaceReverse(arr) {
  var i = 0;
  while (i < arr.length - 1) {
    arr.splice(i, 0, arr.pop());
    i++;
  }
  return arr;
}

// Useage:
var arr = [1, 2, 3];
console.log(inplaceReverse(arr)); // [3, 2, 1]
1
  • Doesn’t require a temp array, just Θ(n²) time. This should be done with single swaps.
    – Ry-
    Feb 12, 2018 at 6:15
5

I've made some test of solutions that not only reverse array but also makes its copy. Here is test code. The reverse2 method is the fastest one in Chrome but in Firefox the reverse method is the fastest.

var array = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9];

var reverse1 = function() {
  var reversed = array.slice().reverse();
};

var reverse2 = function() {
  var reversed = [];
  for (var i = array.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    reversed.push(array[i]);
  }
};

var reverse3 = function() {
  var reversed = [];
  array.forEach(function(v) {
    reversed.unshift(v);
  });
};

console.time('reverse1');
for (var x = 0; x < 1000000; x++) {
  reverse1();
}
console.timeEnd('reverse1'); // Around 184ms on my computer in Chrome

console.time('reverse2');
for (var x = 0; x < 1000000; x++) {
  reverse2();
}
console.timeEnd('reverse2'); // Around 78ms on my computer in Chrome

console.time('reverse3');
for (var x = 0; x < 1000000; x++) {
  reverse3();
}
console.timeEnd('reverse3'); // Around 1114ms on my computer in Chrome
4
> var arr = [1,2,3,4,5,6];
> arr.reverse();
  [6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1]
4
array.reverse() 

Above will reverse your array but modifying the original. If you don't want to modify the original array then you can do this:

var arrayOne = [1,2,3,4,5];

var reverse = function(array){
    var arrayOne = array
    var array2 = [];

    for (var i = arrayOne.length-1; i >= 0; i--){
      array2.push(arrayOne[i])
    } 
    return array2
}

reverse(arrayOne)
2
  • The first example is not true. arrayTwo has a reference to the arrayOne so both arrays will be reversed. May 5, 2015 at 16:08
  • You're right- thanks! I removed the first example so this is now correct :)
    – enjareyes
    May 8, 2015 at 16:36
4
function reverseArray(arr) {
    let reversed = [];
    for (i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) { 
    reversed.push((arr[arr.length-1-i]))
    }
  return reversed;
}
0
4

As others mentioned, you can use .reverse() on the array object.

However if you care about preserving the original object, you may use reduce instead:

const original = ['a', 'b', 'c'];
const reversed = original.reduce( (a, b) => [b].concat(a) );
//                                           ^
//                                           |
//                                           +-- prepend b to previous accumulation

// original: ['a', 'b', 'c'];
// reversed: ['c', 'b', 'a'];
4

Using .pop() method and while loop.

var original = [1,2,3,4];
var reverse = [];
while(original.length){
    reverse.push(original.pop());
}

Output: [4,3,2,1]

4

I'm not sure what is meant by libraries, but here are the best ways I can think of:

// return a new array with .map()
const ReverseArray1 = (array) => {
    let len = array.length - 1;

    return array.map(() => array[len--]);
}

console.log(ReverseArray1([1,2,3,4,5])) //[5,4,3,2,1]

// initialize and return a new array
const ReverseArray2 = (array) => {
    const newArray = [];
    let len = array.length;

    while (len--) {
        newArray.push(array[len]);
    }

    return newArray;
}

console.log(ReverseArray2([1,2,3,4,5]))//[5,4,3,2,1]

// use swapping and return original array
const ReverseArray3 = (array) => {
    let i = 0;
    let j = array.length - 1;

    while (i < j) {
        const swap = array[i];
        array[i++] = array[j];
        array[j--] = swap;
    }

    return array;
}
console.log(ReverseArray3([1,2,3,4,5]))//[5,4,3,2,1]

// use .pop() and .length
const ReverseArray4 = (array) => {
    const newArray = [];

    while (array.length) {
        newArray.push(array.pop());
    }

    return newArray;
}
console.log(ReverseArray4([1,2,3,4,5]))//[5,4,3,2,1]
3

Pure functions to reverse an array using functional programming:

var a = [3,5,7,8];

// ES2015
function immutableReverse(arr) {
  return [ ...a ].reverse();
}

// ES5
function immutableReverse(arr) {
  return a.concat().reverse()
}
3

It can also be achieved using map method.

[1, 2, 3].map((value, index, arr) => arr[arr.length - index - 1])); // [3, 2, 1]

Or using reduce (little longer approach)

[1, 2, 3].reduce((acc, curr, index, arr) => {
    acc[arr.length - index - 1] = curr;
    return acc;
}, []);
3

reverse in place with variable swapping (mutative)

const myArr = ["a", "b", "c", "d"];
for (let i = 0; i < (myArr.length - 1) / 2; i++) {  
    const lastIndex = myArr.length - 1 - i; 
    [myArr[i], myArr[lastIndex]] = [myArr[lastIndex], myArr[i]] 
}
3

Use swapping and return the original array.

const reverseString = (s) => {
  let start = 0, end = s.length - 1;
  while (start < end) {
    [s[start], s[end]] = [s[end], s[start]]; // swap
    start++, end--;
  }
  return s;
};

console.log(reverseString(["s", "t", "r", "e", "s", "s", "e", "d"]));

2

Reverse by using the sort method

  • This is a much more succinct method.

const resultN = document.querySelector('.resultN');
const resultL = document.querySelector('.resultL');

const dataNum = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9];
const dataLetters = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'];

const revBySort = (array) => array.sort((a, b) => a < b);

resultN.innerHTML = revBySort(dataNum);
resultL.innerHTML = revBySort(dataLetters);
<div class="resultN"></div>
<div class="resultL"></div>

2
  • 1
    This in-place reversal isn’t efficient and the sort method is incorrect (an inconsistent comparison function has implementation-defined behaviour).
    – Ry-
    Feb 12, 2018 at 6:17
  • In addition to what Ry mentioned, this is an inefficient method considering in-place changes can be done in O(n/2), because you only need to really transverse half the array. Sort function's time complexity is O(n log n), which is worse than even an O(n) solution.
    – iPzard
    Jan 27, 2021 at 16:49
2

Using ES6 rest operator and arrow function.

const reverse = ([x, ...s]) => x ? [...reverse(s), x] : [];
reverse([1,2,3,4,5]) //[5, 4, 3, 2, 1]
1

Infact the reverse() may not work in some cases, so you have to make an affectation first as the following

let a = [1, 2, 3, 4];
console.log(a);  // [1,2,3,4]
a = a.reverse();
console.log(a); // [4,3,2,1]

or use concat

let a = [1, 2, 3, 4];
console.log(a, a.concat([]).reverse());  // [1,2,3,4], [4,3,2,1]
0

What about without using push() !

Solution using XOR !

var myARray = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8];

function rver(x){
    var l = x.length;
    for(var i=0; i<Math.floor(l/2); i++){

        var a = x[i];
        var b = x[l-1-i];

        a = a^b;
        b = b^a;
        a = a^b;

        x[i] = a;
        x[l-1-i] = b;
    }

    return x;

}

console.log(rver(myARray));
2
  • What does this ^ symbol do in a^b?
    – kittu
    Apr 25, 2017 at 5:45
  • Using temporary variables kind of defeats the point of an XOR swap.
    – Ry-
    Feb 12, 2018 at 6:19
0

JavaScript already has reverse() method on Array, so you don't need to do that much!

Imagine you have the array below:

var arr = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];

Now simply just do this:

arr.reverse();

and you get this as the result:

[5, 4, 3, 2, 1];

But this basically change the original array, you can write a function and use it to return a new array instead, something like this:

function reverse(arr) {
  var i = arr.length, reversed = [];
  while(i) {
    i--;
    reversed.push(arr[i]);
  }
  return reversed;
}

Or simply chaning JavaScript built-in methods for Array like this:

function reverse(arr) {
  return arr.slice().reverse();
}

and you can call it like this:

reverse(arr); //return [5, 4, 3, 2, 1];

Just as mentioned, the main difference is in the second way, you don't touch the original array...

0

How about this?:

  function reverse(arr) {
    function doReverse(a, left, right) {
      if (left >= right) {
        return a;
      }
      const temp = a[left];
      a[left] = a[right];
      a[right] = temp;
      left++;
      right--;
      return doReverse(a, left, right);
    }

    return doReverse(arr, 0, arr.length - 1);
  }

  console.log(reverse([1,2,3,4]));

https://jsfiddle.net/ygpnt593/8/

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.