215

I have a DTO class which I Serialize

Json.Serialize(MyClass)

How can I exclude a public property of it?

(It has to be public, as I use it in my code somewhere else)

  • 4
    Which serialization framework do you use? – Pavel Gatilov Apr 16 '12 at 6:37
  • 35
    IgnoreDataMember ScriptIgnore JsonIgnore depending on the serializer you use – L.B Apr 16 '12 at 6:46
  • 3
    also noteworthy is the [NonSerialized] attribute, which is only applicable to fields (not properties), but otherwise has the same effect as JsonIgnore. – Triynko Feb 9 '16 at 13:53
  • Trynko's comment is very useful.... if you use IgnoreDataMember on a field there will be no error, but it will not be applied. – Tillito Nov 6 '18 at 15:55
140

If you are using System.Web.Script.Serialization in the .NET framework you can put a ScriptIgnore attribute on the members that shouldn't be serialized. See the example taken from here:

Consider the following (simplified) case:

public class User {
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    [ScriptIgnore]
    public bool IsComplete
    {
        get { return Id > 0 && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(Name); }
    } 
} 

In this case, only the Id and the Name properties will be serialized, thus the resulting JSON object would look like this:

{ Id: 3, Name: 'Test User' }

PS. Don't forget to add a reference to "System.Web.Extensions" for this to work

  • 10
    I found ScriptIgnore in System.Web.Script.Serialization namespace. – Sorangwala Abbasali Dec 23 '16 at 11:46
327

If you are using Json.Net attribute [JsonIgnore] will simply ignore the field/property while serializing or deserialising.

public class Car
{
  // included in JSON
  public string Model { get; set; }
  public DateTime Year { get; set; }
  public List<string> Features { get; set; }

  // ignored
  [JsonIgnore]
  public DateTime LastModified { get; set; }
}

Or you can use DataContract and DataMember attribute to selectively serialize/deserialize properties/fields.

[DataContract]
public class Computer
{
  // included in JSON
  [DataMember]
  public string Name { get; set; }
  [DataMember]
  public decimal SalePrice { get; set; }

  // ignored
  public string Manufacture { get; set; }
  public int StockCount { get; set; }
  public decimal WholeSalePrice { get; set; }
  public DateTime NextShipmentDate { get; set; }
}

Refer http://james.newtonking.com/archive/2009/10/23/efficient-json-with-json-net-reducing-serialized-json-size for more details

  • 36
    If I were the OP, I would prefer this answer over the chosen [ScriptIgnore] solution. Primarily due to the congruency of a Json solution so a Json problem. Why involve System.Web.Extensions when the library you are using provides a solution? The absolute best IMHO is the [IgnoreDataMember] attribute, as System.Runtime.Serialization should be compatible with every serializer should you wish to swap out Json. – Steve H. Feb 17 '15 at 14:52
  • IgnoreDataMember does not work with the default JsonResult serializer. – hendryanw Aug 19 '16 at 6:02
  • 1
    NewtonSoft just helped me fully. It made my json look clean without any messy properties being included from my models that are just for backend. – Sorangwala Abbasali Dec 23 '16 at 12:12
  • 1
    @JC Raja How can i ignore property during desalinizing only when this property is null – user123456 Apr 24 '17 at 15:17
  • [NewtonSoft.Json] I want to ignore serializing only. Then any solution for this? – Trương Quốc Khánh Jul 29 '17 at 3:58
30

You can use [ScriptIgnore]:

public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    [ScriptIgnore]
    public bool IsComplete
    {
        get { return Id > 0 && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(Name); }
    }
}

Reference here

In this case the Id and then name will only be serialized

  • URL in your answer is broken. Is [ScriptIgnore] what should be used on the property if your controller is using the base MVC Controller return Json(... ? – Don Cheadle Mar 1 '18 at 20:17
  • I know it is an old comment, but yes, use [ScriptIgnore] in MVC Controller. Be warned though, if you are using SignalR, then you should use [JsonIgnore] too. – Sam Jun 4 at 2:06
13

If you are not so keen on having to decorate code with Attributes as I am, esp when you cant tell at compile time what will happen here is my solution.

Using the Javascript Serializer

    public static class JsonSerializerExtensions
    {
        public static string ToJsonString(this object target,bool ignoreNulls = true)
        {
            var javaScriptSerializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
            if(ignoreNulls)
            {
                javaScriptSerializer.RegisterConverters(new[] { new PropertyExclusionConverter(target.GetType(), true) });
            }
            return javaScriptSerializer.Serialize(target);
        }

        public static string ToJsonString(this object target, Dictionary<Type, List<string>> ignore, bool ignoreNulls = true)
        {
            var javaScriptSerializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
            foreach (var key in ignore.Keys)
            {
                javaScriptSerializer.RegisterConverters(new[] { new PropertyExclusionConverter(key, ignore[key], ignoreNulls) });
            }
            return javaScriptSerializer.Serialize(target);
        }
    }


public class PropertyExclusionConverter : JavaScriptConverter
    {
        private readonly List<string> propertiesToIgnore;
        private readonly Type type;
        private readonly bool ignoreNulls;

        public PropertyExclusionConverter(Type type, List<string> propertiesToIgnore, bool ignoreNulls)
        {
            this.ignoreNulls = ignoreNulls;
            this.type = type;
            this.propertiesToIgnore = propertiesToIgnore ?? new List<string>();
        }

        public PropertyExclusionConverter(Type type, bool ignoreNulls)
            : this(type, null, ignoreNulls){}

        public override IEnumerable<Type> SupportedTypes
        {
            get { return new ReadOnlyCollection<Type>(new List<Type>(new[] { this.type })); }
        }

        public override IDictionary<string, object> Serialize(object obj, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)
        {
            var result = new Dictionary<string, object>();
            if (obj == null)
            {
                return result;
            }
            var properties = obj.GetType().GetProperties();
            foreach (var propertyInfo in properties)
            {
                if (!this.propertiesToIgnore.Contains(propertyInfo.Name))
                {
                    if(this.ignoreNulls && propertyInfo.GetValue(obj, null) == null)
                    {
                         continue;
                    }
                    result.Add(propertyInfo.Name, propertyInfo.GetValue(obj, null));
                }
            }
            return result;
        }

        public override object Deserialize(IDictionary<string, object> dictionary, Type type, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException(); //Converter is currently only used for ignoring properties on serialization
        }
    }
  • 1
    A minor change in the logic and the PropertyExclusionConverter can be turned into a PropertyInclusionConverter. – Zarepheth Aug 26 '15 at 18:18
  • this is just awesome – SaiKiran Mandhala Dec 7 '16 at 12:47
  • One potential issue with this is that it has to do the name-matching and exclusion work over and over each time an object is serialized. However, once compiled, a type's properties won't change--you should make this pre-calculate, per type, the names that should be included and just reuse the list on each row. For a very massive JSON serialization job, caching could make a noticeable difference in performance. – ErikE Jan 22 '17 at 23:36

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