5

Consider the following code:

#include <stdio.h>

int aaa(char *f, ...)
{
    putchar(*f);    
    return 0;
}

int main(void)
{
    aaa("abc");
    aaa("%dabc", 3); 
    aaa(("abc"));
    aaa(("%dabc", 3));
    return 0;
}

I was wondering why the following lines:

    aaa("abc");
    aaa("%dabc", 3); 
    aaa(("abc"));

run without error, but the fourth line (seen below):

    aaa(("%dabc", 3));

generates the following errors:

main.c:15:2: warning: passing argument 1 of 'aaa' makes pointer from integer without a cast

main.c:3:5: note: expected 'char *' but argument is of type `int'

1
  • 3
    These are parentheses, not brackets.
    – user703016
    Apr 16 '12 at 13:12
13

The statement

aaa(("%dabc", 3));

calls the function aaa with the argument ("%dabc", 3) which returns the value 3.

Look up the comma operator for more information.

5
  • 1
    ... and 3 is not compatible with char* (the type of the first argument to aaa), so the compiler gives you a warning.
    – pmg
    Apr 16 '12 at 13:16
  • Why would someone write aaa(("abc")) anyway ? Is there some use to these double-paren ?
    – Eregrith
    Apr 16 '12 at 13:18
  • 1
    Sometimes you need an extra set of parens around an argument when invoking a macro, e.g. when that argument is itself a vararg parameter list to be subsequently passed to a vararg function. But I don't think it ever makes sense to do this for a straight function call.
    – Paul R
    Apr 16 '12 at 13:23
  • "when that argument is itself a vararg parameter list to be subsequently passed to a vararg function. " Could you give an example?
    – vv1133
    Apr 16 '12 at 14:32
  • 2
    Typical example is a debug print macro, where you might pass a printf arg list as one parameter, e.g. DEBUG_PRINT(DBG_LEVEL_1, ("%s = %d", "foo", foo)); where the DEBUG_PRINT macro is defined as #define DEBUG_PRINT(level, args) if (level > gDebugLevel) printf args
    – Paul R
    Apr 16 '12 at 17:56
2

Like in maths, the parentheses inside the function call are interpreted as grouping: e.g. (1) * (2) is the same as 1 * 2, but (1 + 2) * 3 is not the same as 1 + 2 * 3.

In the first example aaa(("abc")): the inside parentheses are evaluated first, but ("abc") is the same as "abc", so this is equivalent to just calling aaa("abc");.

In the second example aaa(("abc",3)): the inside expression is ("abc", 3) i.e. the comma operator comes into play and "abc" is discarded, leaving 3 as the argument to aaa. The compiler is complaining because 3 has type int not char* so you aren't calling the function correctly.

0
1

the lvalue ("xxx", val) evaluates "xxx" and then val and results to the last value in the brackets, i.e. val. the bracket in aaa(...) is the parameter.

1
  • i would remove my answer, Joachims answer is better :-) Apr 16 '12 at 13:15
1

Because the parameter being passed to the function is ("%dabc", 3) which itself invokes the comma operator and returns the value of 3.

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