8

Before you get started; yes I know this is a duplicate question and yes I have looked at the posted solutions. My problem is I could not get them to work.

bool invalidChar (char c)
{ 
    return !isprint((unsigned)c); 
}
void stripUnicode(string & str)
{
    str.erase(remove_if(str.begin(),str.end(), invalidChar), str.end()); 
}

I tested this method on "Prusæus, Ægyptians," and it did nothing I also attempted to substitute isprint for isalnum

The real problem occurs when, in another section of my program I convert string->wstring->string. the conversion balks if there are unicode chars in the string->wstring conversion.

Ref:

How can you strip non-ASCII characters from a string? (in C#)

How to strip all non alphanumeric characters from a string in c++?

Edit:

I still would like to remove all non-ASCII chars regardless yet if it helps, here is where I am crashing:

// Convert to wstring
wchar_t* UnicodeTextBuffer = new wchar_t[ANSIWord.length()+1];
wmemset(UnicodeTextBuffer, 0, ANSIWord.length()+1);
mbstowcs(UnicodeTextBuffer, ANSIWord.c_str(), ANSIWord.length());
wWord = UnicodeTextBuffer; //CRASH

Error Dialog

MSVC++ Debug Library

Debug Assertion Failed!

Program: //myproject

File: f:\dd\vctools\crt_bld\self_x86\crt\src\isctype.c

Line: //Above

Expression:(unsigned)(c+1)<=256

Edit:

Further compounding the matter: the .txt file I am reading in from is ANSI encoded. Everything within should be valid.

Solution:

bool invalidChar (char c) 
{  
    return !(c>=0 && c <128);   
} 
void stripUnicode(string & str) 
{ 
    str.erase(remove_if(str.begin(),str.end(), invalidChar), str.end());  
}

If someone else would like to copy/paste this, I can check this question off.

EDIT:

For future reference: try using the __isascii, iswascii commands

10
  • What happens if you change invalidChar to always return true and what happens when it's always false. Additionally log what ivalidChar gets and it's output.
    – Daniel
    Apr 16, 2012 at 17:26
  • @Dani On it... (more chars to post)
    – AnthonyW
    Apr 16, 2012 at 17:28
  • 1
    Make sure you call setlocale(""); before you do the conversion. There's no point in a conversion if it can't handle non-ASCII characters, is there!
    – Kerrek SB
    Apr 16, 2012 at 17:29
  • @ Dani setting invalidChar to return true kicks out a blank string while false does nothing. I too suspected that to be the problem yet I am unsure what method to use other that isprint and isalnum as they do not seem to be getting the job done.
    – AnthonyW
    Apr 16, 2012 at 17:33
  • @KerrekSB I have this: setlocale(LC_ALL, ""); a few lines further down than the line that throws an error. I use it for converting wstring->string. Are you saying I should move that up a few lines?
    – AnthonyW
    Apr 16, 2012 at 17:35

4 Answers 4

12

Solution:

bool invalidChar (char c) 
{  
    return !(c>=0 && c <128);   
} 
void stripUnicode(string & str) 
{ 
    str.erase(remove_if(str.begin(),str.end(), invalidChar), str.end());  
}

EDIT:

For future reference: try using the __isascii, iswascii commands

0
2

At least one problem is in your invalidChar function. It should be:

return !isprint( static_cast<unsigned char>( c ) );

Casting a char to an unsigned is likely to give some very, very big values if the char is negative (UNIT_MAX+1 + c). Passing such a value toisprint` is undefined behavior.

7
  • switching the method as prescribed fixes Prusæus but not Ægyptians which still causes a crash.
    – AnthonyW
    Apr 16, 2012 at 17:39
  • @AnthonyW If c has type char, and you're on an Intel platform, then casting it to unsigned char before calling isprint should make that part of the code work. Of course, there is still the problem as to what you mean by ASCII; the definition I'd use is c >= 0 && c < 128 (but this includes non-printable ASCII like EOT or DEL). Apr 16, 2012 at 18:00
  • Yes, that is the char set I am looking for. Unless I am mistaken Æ is not a member, yet it refuses to be removed. Of couse, I could be mistaken in which case I need a different approach.
    – AnthonyW
    Apr 16, 2012 at 18:10
  • Switched statement to return !(c>=0 && c <128); <-- this removes it. Apparently Æ is Extended ASCII Character 146 and falls into the system's check for <256. However, even with that the case, that does not explain the Error Dialog above which claimes Æ is outside the range.
    – AnthonyW
    Apr 16, 2012 at 18:17
  • There must be 2 versions of that char as even with a check for <256 it is removed.
    – AnthonyW
    Apr 16, 2012 at 18:59
1

Another solution that doesn't require defining two functions but uses anonymous functions available in C++17 above:

void stripUnicode(string & str) 
{ 
    str.erase(remove_if(str.begin(),str.end(), [](char c){return !(c>=0 && c <128);}), str.end());  
}

I think it looks cleaner

0

isprint depends on the locale, so the character in question must be printable in the current locale.

If you want strictly ASCII, check the range for [0..127]. If you want printable ASCII, check the range and isprint.

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