8

There are quite a few other questions similiar to this but none of them seem to do what I'm trying to do. I'd like pass in a list of string and query

SELECT ownerid where sysid in ('', '', '') -- i.e. List<string>

or like

var chiLst = new List<string>();
var parRec = Lnq.attlnks.Where(a => a.sysid IN chiList).Select(a => a.ownerid);

I've been playing around with a.sysid.Contains() but haven't been able to get anywhere.

1
  • 1
    +1 if you think there should be a first answer to your question by Jon Skeet Badge lol Apr 16, 2012 at 18:28

3 Answers 3

11

Contains is the way forward:

var chiLst = new List<string>();
var parRec = Lnq.attlnks.Where(a => chiList.Contains(a.sysid))
                        .Select(a => a.ownerid);

Although you'd be better off with a HashSet<string> instead of a list, in terms of performance, given all the contains checks. (That's assuming there will be quite a few entries... for a small number of values, it won't make much difference either way, and a List<string> may even be faster.)

Note that the performance aspect is assuming you're using LINQ to Objects for this - if you're using something like LINQ to SQL, it won't matter as the Contains check won't be done in-process anyway.

8
  • 3
    For something like Linq to SQL, HashSet won't make any difference, since it just takes all the elements of the list and generates the IN clause.
    – RobSiklos
    Apr 16, 2012 at 18:25
  • @Jon Skeet What is the difference using HashSet<string> Jon ? Apr 16, 2012 at 18:26
  • 2
    @mellamokb dude, he's jon skeet
    – GSerg
    Apr 16, 2012 at 18:27
  • @Gserg: I know... Cool link btw
    – mellamokb
    Apr 16, 2012 at 18:27
  • 1
    @bumble_bee_tuna: HashSet<T> is optimized for efficient containment checks - whereas for List<T> it has to check each value in turn.
    – Jon Skeet
    Apr 16, 2012 at 18:29
1

You wouldn't call a.sysid.Contains; the syntax for IN (SQL) is the reverse of the syntax for Contains (LINQ)

var parRec = Lnq.attlnks.Where(a => chiList.Contains(a.sysid))
                        .Select(a => a.ownerid);
1

In addition to the Contains approach, you could join:

var parRec = from a in Lnq.attlnks
             join sysid in chiLst
                 on a.sysid equals sysid
             select a.ownerid

I'm not sure whether this will do better than Contains with a HashSet, but it will at least have similar performance. It will certainly do better than using Contains with a list.

1
  • Assuming LINQ to Objects, it will basically build a HashSet<string> within the join implementation. (And it will be faster than a List<T> if the list grows large - if the list is very short, then a hash-based implementation could be slower, as it needs to generate the hash of the target first. There are all kinds of variables in play, really.)
    – Jon Skeet
    Apr 16, 2012 at 18:31

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