128

I saw in WCF they have the [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)] attribute. But WCF seems kind of slow and heavy just to do create a nonblocking function. Ideally there would be something like static void nonblocking MethodFoo(){}, but I don't think that exists.

What is the quickest way to create a nonblocking method call in C#?

E.g.

class Foo
{
    static void Main()
    {
        FireAway(); //No callback, just go away
        Console.WriteLine("Happens immediately");
    }

    static void FireAway()
    {
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(5000);
        Console.WriteLine("5 seconds later");
    }
}

NB: Everyone reading this should think about if they actually want the method to finish. (See #2 top answer) If the method has to finish, then in some places, like an ASP.NET application, you will need to do something to block and keep the thread alive. Otherwise, this could lead to "fire-forget-but-never-actually-execute", in which case,of course, it would be simpler to write no code at all. (A good description of how this works in ASP.NET)

243
ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(o => FireAway());

(five years later...)

Task.Run(() => FireAway());

as pointed out by luisperezphd.

  • You win. No, really, this seems to be the shortest version, unless you encapsulate that into another function. – OregonGhost Jun 19 '09 at 15:40
  • 13
    Thinking about this... in most applications this is fine, but in yours the console app will exit before FireAway sends anything to the console. ThreadPool threads are background threads and die when the app dies. On the other hand, using a Thread wouldn't work either as the console window would disappear before FireAway tried to write to the window. – Will Jun 19 '09 at 15:41
  • 3
    There is no way to have a non-blocking method call that is guaranteed to run, so this is in fact the most accurate answer to the question IMO. If you need to guarantee execution then potential blocking needs to be introduced via a control structure such as AutoResetEvent (as Kev mentioned) – Guvante Jun 19 '09 at 17:40
  • 1
    To run the task in a thread independent of the thread pool, I believe you could also go (new Action(FireAway)).BeginInvoke() – Sam Harwell Sep 14 '09 at 19:01
  • 2
    What about this Task.Factory.StartNew(() => myevent()); from answer stackoverflow.com/questions/14858261/… – Luis Perez Dec 28 '14 at 17:58
34

For C# 4.0 and newer, it strikes me that the best answer is now given here by Ade Miller: Simplest way to do a fire and forget method in c# 4.0

Task.Factory.StartNew(() => FireAway());

Or even...

Task.Factory.StartNew(FireAway);

Or...

new Task(FireAway).Start();

Where FireAway is

public static void FireAway()
{
    // Blah...
}

So by virtue of class and method name terseness this beats the threadpool version by between six and nineteen characters depending on the one you choose :)

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(o => FireAway());
  • 11
    I am most interested in having the best answers easily available on good questions. I would definitely encourage others to do the same. – Patrick Szalapski Dec 18 '14 at 19:21
  • 3
    According to stackoverflow.com/help/referencing, you are required to use blockquotes to indicate that you are quoting from another source. As it is your answer appears to be all your own work. Your intention by re-posting an exact copy of the answer could have been achieved with a link in a comment. – tom redfern Dec 19 '14 at 10:25
  • 1
    how to pass parameters to FireAway? – GuidoG Jun 22 '18 at 7:32
  • I believe you'd have to use the first solution: Task.Factory.StartNew(() => FireAway(foo));. – Patrick Szalapski Jun 22 '18 at 16:30
  • 1
    be cautious while using Task.Factory.StartNew(() => FireAway(foo)); foo cannot be modified in loop as explained here and here – AaA Jul 16 '18 at 7:12
17

To add to Will's answer, if this is a console application, just throw in an AutoResetEvent and a WaitHandle to prevent it exiting before the worker thread completes:

Using System;
Using System.Threading;

class Foo
{
    static AutoResetEvent autoEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);

    static void Main()
    {
        ThreadPoolQueueUserWorkItem(new WaitCallback(FireAway), autoEvent);
        autoEvent.WaitOne(); // Will wait for thread to complete
    }

    static void FireAway(object stateInfo)
    {
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(5000);
        Console.WriteLine("5 seconds later");
        ((AutoResetEvent)stateInfo).Set();
    }
}
  • if this is not a console app and my C# class is COM Visible , will your AutoEvent works ? Is autoEvent.WaitOne() blocking ? – dan_l May 29 '12 at 9:36
  • 5
    @dan_l - No idea, why not ask that as a new question and make a reference to this one. – Kev May 29 '12 at 10:17
  • @dan_l, yes WaitOne is always blocking and AutoResetEvent will always work – AaA Jul 16 '18 at 7:21
  • AutoResetEvent only really works here if there is a single background thread. I wonder if a Barrier would be better when multiple threads are in use. docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/threading/barrier – Martin Brown Apr 3 at 8:52
  • @MartinBrown - not sure that's true. You can have an array of WaitHandles, each one with its own AutoResetEvent and a corresponding ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem. After that just WaitHandle.WaitAll(arrayOfWaitHandles). – Kev Apr 3 at 13:52
15

For .NET 4.5:

Task.Run(() => FireAway());
13

An easy way is to create and start a thread with parameterless lambda:

(new Thread(() => { 
    FireAway(); 
    MessageBox.Show("FireAway Finished!"); 
}) { 
    Name = "Long Running Work Thread (FireAway Call)",
    Priority = ThreadPriority.BelowNormal 
}).Start();

By using this method over ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem you can name your new thread to make it easier for debugging. Also, don't forget to use extensive error handling in your routine because any unhandled exceptions outside of a debugger will abruptly crash your application:

enter image description here

  • +1 for when you need a dedicated thread due to a long-running or blocking process. – Paul Turner Mar 9 '12 at 17:56
10

The recommended way of doing this when you are using Asp.Net and .Net 4.5.2 is by using QueueBackgroundWorkItem. Here is a helper class:

public static class BackgroundTaskRunner
{     
    public static void FireAndForgetTask(Action action)
    {
        HostingEnvironment.QueueBackgroundWorkItem(cancellationToken => // .Net 4.5.2 required
        {
            try
            {
                action();
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                // TODO: handle exception
            }
        });
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Using async
    /// </summary>
    public static void FireAndForgetTask(Func<Task> action)
    {
        HostingEnvironment.QueueBackgroundWorkItem(async cancellationToken => // .Net 4.5.2 required
        {
            try
            {
                await action();
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                // TODO: handle exception
            }
        });
    }
}

Usage example:

BackgroundTaskRunner.FireAndForgetTask(() =>
{
    FireAway();
});

or using async:

BackgroundTaskRunner.FireAndForgetTask(async () =>
{
    await FireAway();
});

This works great on Azure Web Sites.

Reference: Using QueueBackgroundWorkItem to Schedule Background Jobs from an ASP.NET Application in .NET 4.5.2

  • 1
    This will not work for long running tasks. – Manish Jain Sep 15 '16 at 19:11
7

Calling beginInvoke and not catching EndInvoke is not a good approach. Answer is simple: The reason that you should call EndInvoke is because the results of the invocation (even if there is no return value) must be cached by .NET until EndInvoke is called. For example if the invoked code throws an exception then the exception is cached in the invocation data. Until you call EndInvoke it remains in memory. After you call EndInvoke the memory can be released. For this particular case it is possible the memory will remain until the process shuts down because the data is maintained internally by the invocation code. I guess the GC might eventually collect it but I don't know how the GC would know that you have abandoned the data vs. just taking a really long time to retrieve it. I doubt it does. Hence a memory leak can occur.

More can be found on http://haacked.com/archive/2009/01/09/asynchronous-fire-and-forget-with-lambdas.aspx

  • 2
    +1 for haacked's link – Michael Freidgeim Aug 17 '12 at 22:42
  • 3
    The GC can tell when things are abandoned if no reference exists to them. If BeginInvoke returns a wrapper object which holds a reference to, but is not referenced by, the object that holds the real result data, the wrapper object would become eligible for finalization once all references to it were abandoned. – supercat Oct 23 '12 at 20:35
  • I question saying this is "not a good approach"; test it, with the error conditions you are concerned about, and see if you have problems. Even if garbage collection is not perfect, it will probably not affect most applications noticeably. Per Microsoft, "You can call EndInvoke to retrieve the return value from the delegate, if neccesary, but this is not required. EndInvoke will block until the return value can be retrieved." from: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0b1bf3y3(v=vs.90).aspx – Abacus Mar 27 '15 at 20:58
2

The simplest .NET 2.0 and later approach is using the Asynchnonous Programming Model (ie. BeginInvoke on a delegate):

static void Main(string[] args)
{
      new MethodInvoker(FireAway).BeginInvoke(null, null);

      Console.WriteLine("Main: " + Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);

      Thread.Sleep(5000);
}

private static void FireAway()
{
    Thread.Sleep(2000);

    Console.WriteLine("FireAway: " + Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId );  
}
  • Before Task.Run() existed, this was probably the most concise way to do this. – binki Sep 28 '16 at 21:19
1

Almost 10 years later:

Task.Run(FireAway);

I would add exception handling and logging inside FireAway

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