163

Is there any difference (performance, best-practice, etc...) between putting a condition in the JOIN clause vs. the WHERE clause?

For example...

-- Condition in JOIN
SELECT *
FROM dbo.Customers AS CUS
INNER JOIN dbo.Orders AS ORD 
ON CUS.CustomerID = ORD.CustomerID
AND CUS.FirstName = 'John'

-- Condition in WHERE
SELECT *
FROM dbo.Customers AS CUS
INNER JOIN dbo.Orders AS ORD 
ON CUS.CustomerID = ORD.CustomerID
WHERE CUS.FirstName = 'John'

Which do you prefer (and perhaps why)?

  • 4
    Did you run the two queries? Did you check the execution plans generated by the two queries? What did you observe? – S.Lott Jun 19 '09 at 16:51
  • 13
    @S.Lott, this query is for example purposes only. I'm just wondering "in general" which is the preferred method -- if any. – Steve Dignan Jun 19 '09 at 16:54
  • 1
    @Steve Dignan: You should benchmark this with sample data and look at the query plans. The answer will be very, very clear. And -- bonus -- you'll have a piece of code you can reuse when more complex situations arise. – S.Lott Jun 19 '09 at 17:01
  • 1
    I would personally put the condition in the JOIN clause if the condition describes the relation. Generic conditions that just filter the result set would go to the WHERE part then. E.g. FROM Orders JOIN OrderParties ON Orders.Id = OrderParties.Order AND OrderParties.Type = 'Recipient' WHERE Orders.Status = 'Canceled' – Glutexo May 2 '16 at 14:02
135

The relational algebra allows interchangeability of the predicates in the WHERE clause and the INNER JOIN, so even INNER JOIN queries with WHERE clauses can have the predicates rearrranged by the optimizer so that they may already be excluded during the JOIN process.

I recommend you write the queries in the most readable way possible.

Sometimes this includes making the INNER JOIN relatively "incomplete" and putting some of the criteria in the WHERE simply to make the lists of filtering criteria more easily maintainable.

For example, instead of:

SELECT *
FROM Customers c
INNER JOIN CustomerAccounts ca
    ON ca.CustomerID = c.CustomerID
    AND c.State = 'NY'
INNER JOIN Accounts a
    ON ca.AccountID = a.AccountID
    AND a.Status = 1

Write:

SELECT *
FROM Customers c
INNER JOIN CustomerAccounts ca
    ON ca.CustomerID = c.CustomerID
INNER JOIN Accounts a
    ON ca.AccountID = a.AccountID
WHERE c.State = 'NY'
    AND a.Status = 1

But it depends, of course.

  • 19
    Upped for adding it depends. Benchmark everything. – marr75 Jun 19 '09 at 17:02
  • 4
    It's not only about clean query or readability, it's about performance. putting conditions in join improve performance for large amount of data with properly indexed tables. – Shahdat Oct 6 '16 at 15:13
  • 2
    @Shahdat if you are getting that significant a performance difference moving your filter conditions from the where clause to the inner join you need to post those execution plans. – Cade Roux Oct 6 '16 at 16:36
  • 4
    @Cade I have investigated the execution plans - both scenarios showing same cost. I run the queries multiple times seems both taking same about of time. Previously, I was running the queries on production and got significant performance difference because database was being used by live users. Sorry for that confusion. – Shahdat Oct 18 '16 at 16:22
  • 3
    This answer is right for INNER JOINs but not for left/right joins. – sotn May 10 '17 at 12:43
110

For inner joins I have not really noticed a difference (but as with all performance tuning, you need to check against your database under your conditions).

However where you put the condition makes a huge difference if you are using left or right joins. For instance consider these two queries:

SELECT *
FROM dbo.Customers AS CUS 
LEFT JOIN dbo.Orders AS ORD 
ON CUS.CustomerID = ORD.CustomerID
WHERE ORD.OrderDate >'20090515'

SELECT *
FROM dbo.Customers AS CUS 
LEFT JOIN dbo.Orders AS ORD 
ON CUS.CustomerID = ORD.CustomerID
AND ORD.OrderDate >'20090515'

The first will give you only those records that have an order dated later than May 15, 2009 thus converting the left join to an inner join. The second will give those records plus any customers with no orders. The results set is very different depending on where you put the condition. (Select * if for example purposes only, you should not use of course in production code.) The exception to this is when you want to see only the records in one table but not the other. Then you use the where clause for the condition not the join.

SELECT *
FROM dbo.Customers AS CUS 
LEFT JOIN dbo.Orders AS ORD 
ON CUS.CustomerID = ORD.CustomerID
WHERE ORD.OrderID is null
  • Thanks for explaining with examples – Rennish Joseph Apr 15 '17 at 15:00
  • Great answer - clear and relevant to the OP – psrpsrpsr Feb 13 '18 at 15:08
  • 1
    "thus converting the left join to an inner join". How? Can you elaborate a bit? – user1451111 Apr 16 '18 at 14:57
  • @user1451111 Learn what LEFT/RIGHT JOIN returns: INNER JOIN rows plus unmatched left/right table rows extended by NULLs. FULL JOIN returns INNER JOIN rows UNION ALL unmatched left & right table rows extended by NULLs. Always know what INNER JOIN you want as part of an OUTER JOIN. A WHERE or ON that requires a possibly NULL-extended column to be not NULL after an OUTER JOIN ON removes any rows extended by NULLs, ie leaves only INNER JOIN rows, ie "turns an OUTER JOIN into an INNER JOIN". – philipxy Sep 21 '18 at 22:07
  • 1
    @user1451111 or, in simpler terms: A left join B is every row from A joined to every matching row from B. If B has no row that matches, then the A columns have a value but every column from B on that row shows as NULL values. If you have written where B.somecolumn = ‘somevalue’ then you have a NULL (B.somecolumn) being compared with ‘somevalue’ . Anything compared with NULL is false, so all your rows where there is no matching B row for the A row, are eliminated, and the results you get are the same as an INNER JOIN would give, hence the outer join has become an inner one – Caius Jard Sep 22 '18 at 5:43
23

Most RDBMS products will optimize both queries identically. In "SQL Performance Tuning" by Peter Gulutzan and Trudy Pelzer, they tested multiple brands of RDBMS and found no performance difference.

I prefer to keep join conditions separate from query restriction conditions.

If you're using OUTER JOIN sometimes it's necessary to put conditions in the join clause.

  • 1
    I agree with you that syntactically it's cleaner, and I have to defer to your knowledge of that book and your very high reputation, but I can think of 4 queries in the last week with very different execution plans, CPU times, and logical reads when I moved where predicates to the join. – marr75 Jun 19 '09 at 16:58
  • 2
    You were asking about best practices. As soon as you get into testing how a specific RDBMS implementation works, other folks have given the correct advice: benchmark. – Bill Karwin Jun 19 '09 at 17:09
10

WHERE will filter after the JOIN has occurred.

Filter on the JOIN to prevent rows from being added during the JOIN process.

  • 10
    Semantically, they are prevented during the INNER JOIN process, but the optimizer can rearrange INNER JOIN and WHERE predicates at will, so the optimizer is free to exclude them later if it wishes. – Cade Roux Jun 19 '09 at 17:02
  • 1
    Cade Roux: Right. Often times what you write in SQL isn't what the optimizer will give you when all is said and done. I would suppose then that this would be right in an all-theory world, while your answer is of course more correct in the world of automatic query optimizers :) – TheTXI Jun 19 '09 at 17:09
  • I like this explanation of the condition in the ON – Robert Rocha Aug 30 '18 at 12:23
3

I prefer the JOIN to join full tables/Views and then use the WHERE To introduce the predicate of the resulting set.

It feels syntactically cleaner.

2

I typically see performance increases when filtering on the join. Especially if you can join on indexed columns for both tables. You should be able to cut down on logical reads with most queries doing this too, which is, in a high volume environment, a much better performance indicator than execution time.

I'm always mildly amused when someone shows their SQL benchmarking and they've executed both versions of a sproc 50,000 times at midnight on the dev server and compare the average times.

0

Putting the condition in the join seems "semantically wrong" to me, as that's not what JOINs are "for". But that's very qualitative.

Additional problem: if you decide to switch from an inner join to, say, a right join, having the condition be inside the JOIN could lead to unexpected results.

  • 3
    Sometimes these results are kinda "expected" and sometimes even "intentional" (for example with outer joins, where WHERE condition has different semantics than JOIN condition). – Thetam May 30 '12 at 13:30
0

Joins are quicker in my opinion when you have a larger table. It really isn't that much of a difference though especially if you are dealing with a rather smaller table. When I first learned about joins, i was told that conditions in joins are just like where clause conditions and that i could use them interchangeably if the where clause was specific about which table to do the condition on.

-3

It is better to add the condition in the Join. Performance is more important than readability. For large datasets, it matters.

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