31

I'm currently in a spot, where I need to create or update entities in a foreach loop.

So I'm doing the following (short code):

foreach ($dataset as $data) {
    $entity = new Entity();

    // ---- Some setting operations on the entity

    $em->persist($entity);
}

$em->flush();

The thing I was expecting is that Doctrine manages the entities and then with one statement inserts the entities into the table.

But it occurs, that Doctrine makes one statement for each created entity. Since the $dataset array can be pretty big (a lot of entities created), I would like to have it packed into one statement.

How can I achieve this?

10
  • I don't think it's possible without altering Doctrine code.
    – AlterPHP
    Apr 17, 2012 at 12:54
  • @PéCé : I too think the behavior Johannes describes is the one that is supposed to occur. It's one of Doctrine selling argument.
    – greg0ire
    Apr 17, 2012 at 13:12
  • 2
    @PéCé : look at slide 47 : slideshare.net/jwage/doctrine-2-not-the-same-old-php-orm
    – greg0ire
    Apr 17, 2012 at 13:50
  • 1
    I guess what Johannes want is a unique statement as : INSERT INTO table (a, b, c) VALUES (a1, b1, c1), (a2, b2, c2), (a3, b3, c3); instead of 3 simple INSERT. What the slideshow explains is how Doctrine can improve mass insert statements by using transactions, that is already a best practice implementation.
    – AlterPHP
    Apr 17, 2012 at 13:57
  • 2
    Not the answer for your question, but you should read this to keep memory usage low:readthedocs.org/docs/doctrine-orm/en/latest/reference/…
    – Maxence
    Apr 18, 2012 at 9:31

3 Answers 3

24

From the Doctrine documentation, it says that inserts are best performed with batch. And its a development of @AlterPHP 's answer.

You could use :

$batchSize = 20;

for ($i = 1; $i <= 10000; ++$i) {

    $car = new Car();
    // ... set number of wheels, but should always be to 4 right ?

    $em->persist($car);

    if (($i % $batchSize) === 0) {
        $em->flush();
        $em->clear(Car::class); // Detaches all Car objects from Doctrine!
    }
}

$em->flush(); // Persist objects that did not make up an entire batch
$em->clear(Car::class);

PS: i just read that from Doctrine 13.1. Bulk Inserts section. Now all you'll need is a bigger parking !

3
  • 1
    I know this is an old answer, but what is the purpose of $em->clear()? I am trying to use this but had to remove that statement, or Doctrine would give an error when it would try to persist related entities which the persisted entity was not configured to cascade.
    – Will
    Apr 28, 2016 at 8:37
  • 4
    $em->clear() means that all entities previously attached to the entity manager are now detached. It helps prevent memory leaks, but on the other hand you wont be able to perform further persist/update operations on entities because they are now unmanaged by the entity manager. Apr 28, 2016 at 8:53
  • I'm so confuse with the its statement in the documentation Larger batch sizes mean more prepared statement reuse internally but also mean more work during flush. So I supposed more prepare statement is a bad thing? And more work during flush is also a bad thing? So we should use a smaller batch size?
    – reddy
    Jan 5, 2020 at 0:48
19

As suggested by greg0ire, this link describes how Doctrine optimizes INSERT statements : https://www.slideshare.net/jwage/doctrine-2-not-the-same-old-php-orm/47-sflive2010_Insert_Performance_Inserting_20 (have a look from slide #47). It uses transactions but doesn't group INSERT of same objects in a unique statement.

If you really need to divide the amount of data you pass to your DB server at once, I suggest you process EntityManager::flush() every x statement.

3
  • 1
    as always with this kind of answers - the link is broken
    – Zanshin13
    Jan 29, 2018 at 14:35
  • It's not, maybe you can't visit the site from your place, but from France, I can ensure it works. I changed the link to directly point the slide #47...
    – AlterPHP
    Jan 30, 2018 at 9:20
  • I was wrong, the link is up, its blocked for my country cause its LinkedIn. But i think it wouldn't be bad to copy the code from the slide, its only 8 lines... My apologies, didn't mean to cause any offence.
    – Zanshin13
    Jan 30, 2018 at 11:46
4

Change this code:

foreach ($dataset as $data) {
    $entity = new Entity();
    // ---- Some setting operations on the entity
    $em->persist($entity);
}

to:

foreach ($dataset as $data) {
    $entity = new Entity();
    // ---- Some setting operations on the entity
    $em->persist($entity);
    $em->flush();
    $em->clear();
}
3
  • 8
    Well this obviously forces the one insert per statement. I thought there would be a way to insert all with one statement. Jun 6, 2012 at 6:59
  • 1
    @eddy flush() is called at every single iteration! that's not an optimal way is it? and might i add, putting flush() is redundant in your perticular code snippet, as you are already createing an Entity() object Aug 28, 2015 at 7:48
  • 2
    Can't agree with this solution, guys. Calling flush() every single time in a loop is not a good idea. If the data that needs to be looped is big enough that would slow the performance enormously. Dec 17, 2015 at 16:08

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