I have a TextBoxD1.Text and I want to convert it to an int to store it in a database.

How can I do this?

28 Answers 28

up vote 767 down vote accepted

Try this:

int x = Int32.Parse(TextBoxD1.Text);

or better yet:

int x = 0;

Int32.TryParse(TextBoxD1.Text, out x);

Also, since Int32.TryParse returns a bool you can use its return value to make decisions about the results of the parsing attempt:

int x = 0;

if (Int32.TryParse(TextBoxD1.Text, out x))
{
    // you know that the parsing attempt
    // was successful
}

If you are curious, the difference between Parse and TryParse is best summed up like this:

The TryParse method is like the Parse method, except the TryParse method does not throw an exception if the conversion fails. It eliminates the need to use exception handling to test for a FormatException in the event that s is invalid and cannot be successfully parsed. - MSDN

  • 2
    What if the integer is 64 bit, or looks like "aslkdlksadjsd"? Is this still safe? – Jonny Dec 10 '14 at 10:11
  • 5
    @Jonny Int64.Parse(). If the input is non-int, then you will get an execption and a stack trace with Int64.Parse, or the boolean False with Int64.TryParse(), so you'd need an if statement, like if (Int32.TryParse(TextBoxD1.Text, out x)) {}. – user4409948 Aug 15 '15 at 11:27
  • 20
    @Jonny: I never saw an integer that looks like "aslkdlksadjsd"... – Roberto Sep 29 '15 at 23:57
  • You could also try to initialize the variable in the TryParse if its going to be used only inside the success condition. eg: Int32.TryParse(TextBoxD1.Text, out int x)) – simplysiby Sep 14 '17 at 4:02
  • 1
    Maybe this is incredibly obvious to everyone else, but for noobish people what 'out x' does is set the value of x to the string-cast-as-integer, if the casting is successful. I.e. in this case, x = 0 if the string has any non-integer characters, or x = value of string-as-integer otherwise. So the neat thing is this is one short expression which tells you if casting is successful or not, AND stores the cast integer in a variable at same time. Obviously you would often want to continue above line with 'else { // string parsed is not an integer, therefore some code to handle this situation }' – Will Croxford Jul 13 at 8:12
Convert.ToInt32( TextBoxD1.Text );

Use this if you feel confident that the contents of the text box is a valid int. A safer option is

int val = 0;
Int32.TryParse( TextBoxD1.Text, out val );

This will provide you with some default value you can use. Int32.TryParse also returns a boolean value indicating whether it was able to parse or not, so you can even use it as the condition of an if statement.

if( Int32.TryParse( TextBoxD1.Text, out val ){
  DoSomething(..);
} else {
  HandleBadInput(..);
}
int.TryParse()

It won't throw if the text is not numeric.

  • This is better than the other two. User input is likely to be the wrong format. This one is more efficient than using exception handling like the others require. – UncleO Jun 19 '09 at 20:06
  • Exactly. It returns false if the conversion failed. – n8wrl Jun 19 '09 at 20:07
int myInt = int.Parse(TextBoxD1.Text)

Another way would be:

bool isConvertible = false;
int myInt = 0;

isConvertible = int.TryParse(TextBoxD1.Text, out myInt);

The difference between the two is that the first one would throw an exception if the value in your textbox can't be converted, whereas the second one would just return false.

  • The above boolean variable is very useful we are using the converted value for comaprison, let say in an if clause. code int NumericJL; bool isNum = int.TryParse(nomeeJobBand, out NumericJL); if (isNum)//The the retured JL is able to pasred to int then go ahead for comparison { if (!(NumericJL >= 6)) { //Nominate } //else {}} – baymax Dec 30 '15 at 14:21

You need to parse the string, and you also need to ensure that it is truly in the format of an integer.

The easiest way is this:

int parsedInt = 0;
if (int.TryParse(TextBoxD1.Text, out parsedInt))
{
   // Code for if the string was valid
}
else
{
   // Code for if the string was invalid
}
int x = 0;
int.TryParse(TextBoxD1.Text, out x);

The TryParse statement returns a boolean representing whether the parse has succeeded or not. If it succeeded, the parsed value is stored into the second parameter.

See Int32.TryParse Method (String, Int32) for more detailed information.

Enjoy it...

int i = 0;
string s = "123";
i =int.Parse(s);
i = Convert.ToInt32(s);

Be carefull when using Convert.ToInt32() on a char!
It will return the UTF-16 Code of the character!

If you access the string only in a certain position using the [i] indexing operator it will return a char and not a string!

String input = "123678";

int x = Convert.ToInt32(input[4]);  // returns 55

int x = Convert.ToInt32(input[4].toString());  // returns 7

While there are already many solutions here that describe int.Parse, there's something important missing in all the answers. Typically, the string representations of numeric values differ by culture. Elements of numeric strings such as currency symbols, group (or thousands) separators, and decimal separators all vary by culture.

If you want to create a robust way to parse a string to an integer, it's therefore important to take the culture information into account. If you don't, the current culture settings will be used. That might give a user a pretty nasty surprise -- or even worse, if you're parsing file formats. If you just want English parsing, it's best to simply make it explicit, by specifying the culture settings to use:

var culture = CultureInfo.GetCulture("en-US");
int result = 0;
if (int.TryParse(myString, NumberStyles.Integer, culture, out result))
{
    // use result...
}

For more information, read up on CultureInfo, specifically NumberFormatInfo on MSDN.

As explained in the TryParse documentation, TryParse() returns a boolean which indicates that a valid number was found:

bool success = Int32.TryParse(TextBoxD1.Text, out val);

if (success)
{
// put val in database
}
else
{
// handle the case that the string doesn't contain a valid number
}

You can write your own extesion method

public static class IntegerExtensions
{
    public static int ParseInt(this string value, int defaultValue = 0)
    {
        int parsedValue;
        if (int.TryParse(value, out parsedValue))
        {
            return parsedValue;
        }

        return defaultValue;
    }

    public static int? ParseNullableInt(this string value)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
        {
            return null;
        }

        return value.ParseInt();
    }
}

And wherever in code just call

int myNumber = someString.ParseInt(); // returns value or 0
int age = someString.ParseInt(18); // with default value 18
int? userId = someString.ParseNullableInt(); // returns value or null

In this concrete case

int yourValue = TextBoxD1.Text.ParseInt();
  • what is int defaultValue = 0 for? where do you use that variable? – Benj Nov 18 '16 at 0:02
  • @Benj Looks like a typo, I think it is meant to be set if TryParse fails – TheLethalCoder Dec 16 '16 at 15:02
  • @Benj I fixed the example – Miroslav Holec Dec 17 '16 at 15:31
  • Shouldn't the class be called StringExtensions instead of IntegerExtensions, since these extension methods act on a string and not on an int? – Shiva Feb 9 '17 at 4:47
  • Typo: You can write your own extesion method – Ikem Krueger Jul 26 at 19:43

You can use either,

int i = Convert.ToInt32(TextBoxD1.Text);

or

int i =int.Parse(TextBoxD1.Text);
//May be quite some time ago but I just want throw in some line for any one who may still need it

int intValue;
string strValue = "2021";

try
{
    intValue = Convert.ToInt32(strValue);
}
catch
{
    //Default Value if conversion fails OR return specified error
    // Example 
    intValue = 2000;
}
  • Defaulting in this case would not be a good idea. If at all defaulting is required crucially, I recommend returning 0. – Prageeth Saravanan Jan 3 '17 at 19:47

This would do

string x=TextBoxD1.Text;
int xi=Convert.ToInt32(x);

Or you can use

int xi=Int32.Parse(x);

Refer Microsoft Developer Network for more information

You can convert a string to int in C# using:

Functions of convert class i.e. Convert.ToInt16(), Convert.ToInt32(), Convert.ToInt64() or by using Parse and TryParse Functions. Examples are given here.

You also may use an extension method, so it will be more readable (although everybody is already used to the regular Parse functions).

public static class StringExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Converts a string to int.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value">The string to convert.</param>
    /// <returns>The converted integer.</returns>
    public static int ParseToInt32(this string value)
    {
        return int.Parse(value);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Checks whether the value is integer.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value">The string to check.</param>
    /// <param name="result">The out int parameter.</param>
    /// <returns>true if the value is an integer; otherwise, false.</returns>
    public static bool TryParseToInt32(this string value, out int result)
    {
        return int.TryParse(value, out result);
    }
}

And then you can call it that way:

  1. If you are sure that your string is an integer, like "50".

    int num = TextBoxD1.Text.ParseToInt32();
    
  2. If you are not sure and want to prevent crashes.

    int num;
    if (TextBoxD1.Text.TryParseToInt32(out num))
    {
        //The parse was successful, the num has the parsed value.
    }
    

To make it more dynamic, so you can parse it also to double, float, etc., you can make a generic extension.

Conversion of string to int can be done for: int, Int32, Int64 and other data types reflecting integer data types in .NET

Below example shows this conversion:

This show (for info) data adapter element initialized to int value. The same can be done directly like,

int xxiiqVal = Int32.Parse(strNabcd);

Ex.

string strNii = "";
UsrDataAdapter.SelectCommand.Parameters["@Nii"].Value = Int32.Parse(strNii );

Link to see this demo.

you can do like below without TryParse or inbuilt functions

static int convertToInt(string a)
{
    int x=0;
    for (int i = 0; i < a.Length; i++)
        {
            int temp=a[i] - '0';
            if (temp!=0)
            {
                x += temp * (int)Math.Pow(10, (a.Length - (i+1)));
            }              
        }
    return x ;
}
  • convertToInt("1234") gives 10000......if you are going to copy the answer of someone else, at least copy the whole thing – SerenityNow Apr 11 at 14:41
  • don't compare me with yourself.. add updated solution instead .. lol – lazydeveloper Apr 11 at 15:19
  • @SerenityNow you can check now.It was typo mistake. – lazydeveloper Apr 11 at 18:12
  • referring to your id, a lazy-developer will not create such method! ;D good – S.Serpooshan Aug 1 at 8:36
int i = Convert.ToInt32(TextBoxD1.Text);

the way i always do this is like this

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace example_string_to_int
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            string a = textBox1.Text;
            // this turns the text in text box 1 into a string
            int b;
            if (!int.TryParse(a, out b))
            {
                MessageBox.Show("this is not a number");
            }
            else
            {
                textBox2.Text = a+" is a number" ;
            }
            // then this if statment says if the string not a number display an error elce now you will have an intager.
        }
    }
}

this is how i would do it, i hope this helps. (:

int x = Int32.TryParse(TextBoxD1.Text, out x)?x:0;

You can try this, it will work:

int x = Convert.ToInt32(TextBoxD1.Text);

The string value in the variable TextBoxD1.Text will be converted into Int32 and will be stored in x.

If you're looking for the long way, just create your one method:

static int convertToInt(string a)
    {
        int x = 0;

        Char[] charArray = a.ToCharArray();
        int j = charArray.Length;

        for (int i = 0; i < charArray.Length; i++)
        {
            j--;
            int s = (int)Math.Pow(10, j);

            x += ((int)Char.GetNumericValue(charArray[i]) * s);
        }
        return x;
    }

METHOD 1

int  TheAnswer1 = 0;
bool Success = Int32.TryParse("42", out TheAnswer1);
if (!Success) {
    Console.WriteLine("String not Convertable to an Integer");
}

METHOD 2

int TheAnswer2 = 0;
try {
    TheAnswer2 = Int32.Parse("42");
}
catch {
    Console.WriteLine("String not Convertable to an Integer");
}

METHOD 3

int TheAnswer3 = 0;
try {
    TheAnswer3 = Int32.Parse("42");
}
catch (FormatException) {
    Console.WriteLine("String not in the correct format for an Integer");
}
catch (ArgumentNullException) {
    Console.WriteLine("String is null");
}
catch (OverflowException) {
    Console.WriteLine("String represents a number less than"
                      + "MinValue or greater than MaxValue");
}

This code works for me in Visual Studio 2010:

int someValue = Convert.ToInt32(TextBoxD1.Text);

The most simple way is to use an extension helper like this:

public static class StrExtensions
{
  public static int ToInt(this string s, int defVal = 0) => int.TryParse(s, out var v) ? v : defVal;
  public static int? ToNullableInt(this string s, int? defVal = null) => int.TryParse(s, out var v) ? v : defVal;
}

Usage is so simple:

var x = "123".ToInt(); // 123
var y = "abc".ToInt(); // 0

string t = null;
var z = t.ToInt(-1); // -1
var w = "abc".ToNullableInt(); // null

You can convert string to an integer value with the help of parse method.

Eg:

int val = Int32.parse(stringToBeParsed);
int x = Int32.parse(1234);

this may help you ;D

{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        float Stukprijs;
        float Aantal;
        private void label2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {

        }

        private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("In de eersre textbox staat een geldbedrag." + Environment.NewLine + "In de tweede textbox staat een aantal." + Environment.NewLine + "Bereken wat er moetworden betaald." + Environment.NewLine + "Je krijgt 15% korting over het bedrag BOVEN de 100." + Environment.NewLine + "Als de korting meer dan 10 euri is," + Environment.NewLine + "wordt de korting textbox lichtgroen");
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            errorProvider1.Clear();
            errorProvider2.Clear();
            if (float.TryParse(textBox1.Text, out Stukprijs))
            {
                if (float.TryParse(textBox2.Text, out Aantal))
                {
                    float Totaal = Stukprijs * Aantal;
                    string Output = Totaal.ToString();
                    textBox3.Text = Output;
                    if (Totaal >= 100)
                    {
                        float korting = Totaal - 100;
                        float korting2 = korting / 100 * 15;
                        string Output2 = korting2.ToString();
                        textBox4.Text = Output2;
                        if (korting2 >= 10)
                        {
                            textBox4.BackColor = Color.LightGreen;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            textBox4.BackColor = SystemColors.Control;
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        textBox4.Text = "0";
                        textBox4.BackColor = SystemColors.Control;
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    errorProvider2.SetError(textBox2, "Aantal plz!");
                }

            }
            else
            {
                errorProvider1.SetError(textBox1, "Bedrag plz!");
                if (float.TryParse(textBox2.Text, out Aantal))
                {

                }
                else
                {
                    errorProvider2.SetError(textBox2, "Aantal plz!");
                }
            }

        }

        private void BTNwissel_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //LL, LU, LR, LD.
            Color c = LL.BackColor;
            LL.BackColor = LU.BackColor;
            LU.BackColor = LR.BackColor;
            LR.BackColor = LD.BackColor;
            LD.BackColor = c;
        }

        private void button3_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("zorg dat de kleuren linksom wisselen als je op de knop drukt.");
        }
    }
}

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