28

Given a PHP array of strings, e.g.:

['peter', 'paul', 'mary']

How to generate all possible permutations of elements of this array? i.e.:

peter-paul-mary
peter-mary-paul
paul-peter-mary
paul-mary-peter
mary-peter-paul
mary-paul-peter
  • 3
    What do you need it for? This is too expensive, I think... Must be something more clever... – Andreyco Apr 19 '12 at 6:48
  • This is an operation with exponential running time. When you've got 10 elements in the array you'll hit thousands of permutations. When it's 20 you'll probably be well into the millions. – GordonM Apr 19 '12 at 7:01
  • I think you mean permutation not combination. – Jack Apr 19 '12 at 7:05
  • @Andreyco to check whether a webform of three fields exists in an one-column table. – ohho Apr 19 '12 at 7:38
  • Hi, There's a PHP library that does everything you need, using generators and/or iterators. Find the lib here: github.com/drupol/phpermutations Let me know if you need help. – Pol Dellaiera Jul 2 '17 at 19:39
20
0
function pc_permute($items, $perms = array()) {
    if (empty($items)) { 
        echo join(' ', $perms) . "<br />";
    } else {
        for ($i = count($items) - 1; $i >= 0; --$i) {
             $newitems = $items;
             $newperms = $perms;
             list($foo) = array_splice($newitems, $i, 1);
             array_unshift($newperms, $foo);
             pc_permute($newitems, $newperms);
         }
    }
}

$arr = array('peter', 'paul', 'mary');

pc_permute($arr);

or

function pc_next_permutation($p, $size) {
    // slide down the array looking for where we're smaller than the next guy
    for ($i = $size - 1; $p[$i] >= $p[$i+1]; --$i) { }

    // if this doesn't occur, we've finished our permutations
    // the array is reversed: (1, 2, 3, 4) => (4, 3, 2, 1)
    if ($i == -1) { return false; }

    // slide down the array looking for a bigger number than what we found before
    for ($j = $size; $p[$j] <= $p[$i]; --$j) { }

    // swap them
    $tmp = $p[$i]; $p[$i] = $p[$j]; $p[$j] = $tmp;

    // now reverse the elements in between by swapping the ends
    for (++$i, $j = $size; $i < $j; ++$i, --$j) {
         $tmp = $p[$i]; $p[$i] = $p[$j]; $p[$j] = $tmp;
    }

    return $p;
}

$set = split(' ', 'she sells seashells'); // like array('she', 'sells', 'seashells')
$size = count($set) - 1;
$perm = range(0, $size);
$j = 0;

do { 
     foreach ($perm as $i) { $perms[$j][] = $set[$i]; }
} while ($perm = pc_next_permutation($perm, $size) and ++$j);

foreach ($perms as $p) {
    print join(' ', $p) . "\n";
}

http://docstore.mik.ua/orelly/webprog/pcook/ch04_26.htm

| improve this answer | |
  • I ended up using pc_next_permutation() for better return types. Thanks! – ohho Apr 20 '12 at 8:04
11
0

This does what you need, in place, i.e. without allocating any additional memory. It stores the resulting permutations the $results array. I am pretty confident that this is the fasted way to solve the task.

<?php
function computePermutations($array) {
    $result = [];

    $recurse = function($array, $start_i = 0) use (&$result, &$recurse) {
        if ($start_i === count($array)-1) {
            array_push($result, $array);
        }

        for ($i = $start_i; $i < count($array); $i++) {
            //Swap array value at $i and $start_i
            $t = $array[$i]; $array[$i] = $array[$start_i]; $array[$start_i] = $t;

            //Recurse
            $recurse($array, $start_i + 1);

            //Restore old order
            $t = $array[$i]; $array[$i] = $array[$start_i]; $array[$start_i] = $t;
        }
    };

    $recurse($array);

    return $result;
}


$results = computePermutations(array('foo', 'bar', 'baz'));
print_r($results);

This works in PHP>5.4. I used a anonymous function for recursion to keep the main function's interface clean.

| improve this answer | |
6
0

I needed something similar and found this post while looking. Landed up writing the following which does the job.

With 8 items it works fairly quickly (a bit quicker than the examples I found online), but go beyond that and the run time ramps up rapidly. If you only need to output the results it could be made quicker and the memory use reduced massively.

print_r(AllPermutations(array('peter', 'paul', 'mary')));

function AllPermutations($InArray, $InProcessedArray = array())
{
    $ReturnArray = array();
    foreach($InArray as $Key=>$value)
    {
        $CopyArray = $InProcessedArray;
        $CopyArray[$Key] = $value;
        $TempArray = array_diff_key($InArray, $CopyArray);
        if (count($TempArray) == 0)
        {
            $ReturnArray[] = $CopyArray;
        }
        else
        {
            $ReturnArray = array_merge($ReturnArray, AllPermutations($TempArray, $CopyArray));
        }
    }
    return $ReturnArray;
}

Note that the number of permutations is the factorial of the number of items in the array. For 3 items there are 6 permutations, for 4 there are 24, for 5 there are 120, for 6 there are 720, etc.

EDIT

Came back to have a look at this and done some revisions.

Below is an improved version of this function, which uses less storage and is quicker (quicker than other solutions I have seen).

It takes the return array as a parameter, passing it through by reference. This reduces the amount of duplication of data as it runs through.

function AllPermutations($InArray, &$ReturnArray = array(), $InProcessedArray = array())
{
    if (count($InArray) == 1)
    {
        $ReturnArray[] = array_merge($InProcessedArray, $InArray);
    }
    else
    {
        foreach($InArray as $Key=>$value)
        {
            $CopyArray = $InArray;
            unset($CopyArray[$Key]);
            AllPermutations2($CopyArray, $ReturnArray, array_merge($InProcessedArray, array($Key=>$value)));
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
4
0

I expanded a bit on the answer of Jack

function pc_permute($items, $perms = [],&$ret = []) {
   if (empty($items)) {
       $ret[] = $perms;
   } else {
       for ($i = count($items) - 1; $i >= 0; --$i) {
           $newitems = $items;
           $newperms = $perms;
           list($foo) = array_splice($newitems, $i, 1);
           array_unshift($newperms, $foo);
           $this->pc_permute($newitems, $newperms,$ret);
       }
   }
   return $ret;
}

This will actually return an array with all possible permutations.

$options = ['startx','starty','startz','endx','endy','endz'];
$x = $this->pc_permute($options);
var_dump($x);

  [0]=>
 array(6) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "startx"
    [1]=>
    string(6) "starty"
    [2]=>
    string(6) "startz"
    [3]=>
    string(4) "endx"
    [4]=>
    string(4) "endy"
    [5]=>
    string(4) "endz"
  }
  [1]=>
  array(6) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "starty"
    [1]=>
    string(6) "startx"
    [2]=>
    string(6) "startz"
    [3]=>
    string(4) "endx"
    [4]=>
    string(4) "endy"
    [5]=>
    string(4) "endz"
  }
  [2]=>
  array(6) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "startx"
    [1]=>
    string(6) "startz"
    [2]=>
    string(6) "starty"
    [3]=>
    string(4) "endx"
    [4]=>
    string(4) "endy"
    [5]=>
    string(4) "endz"
  }
  [3]=>
  array(6) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "startz"
    [1]=>
    string(6) "startx"
    [2]=>
    string(6) "starty"
    [3]=>
    string(4) "endx"
    [4]=>
    string(4) "endy"
    [5]=>
    string(4) "endz"
  }
  [4]=>
  array(6) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "starty"
    [1]=>
    string(6) "startz"
    [2]=>
    string(6) "startx"
    [3]=>
    string(4) "endx"
    [4]=>
    string(4) "endy"
    [5]=>
    string(4) "endz"
  }
  [5]=>
  array(6) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "startz"
    [1]=>
    string(6) "starty"
    [2]=>
    string(6) "startx"
    [3]=>
    string(4) "endx"
    [4]=>
    string(4) "endy"
    [5]=>
    string(4) "endz"
  }
  [6]=> ................ a lot more

I found it a bit more usefull to get an array back instead of a string. Then it's up to the using application how to handle the resutls(to join them, or something else)

| improve this answer | |
3
0

Simple version with recursion and no artificial extra arguments:

function permuteArray(array $input) {
    $input = array_values($input);

    // permutation of 1 value is the same value
    if (count($input) === 1) {
        return array($input);
    }

    // to permute multiple values, pick a value to put in the front and 
    // permute the rest; repeat this with all values of the original array
    $result = [];
    for ($i = 0; $i < count($input); $i++) {
        $copy  = $input;
        $value = array_splice($copy, $i, 1);
        foreach (permuteArray($copy) as $permutation) {
            array_unshift($permutation, $value[0]);
            $result[] = $permutation;
        }
    }

    return $result;
}

This algorithm is nice and instructive how you would do it on paper, but otherwise very inefficient as it calculates same permutations multiple times. Not to say that it is very impractical for calculating permutations of larger arrays as the space and number of calculations grow exponentially.

| improve this answer | |
  • Best solution, since this approach does NOT mess up with duplicate values in input. So input like '1','1','2' would generate the desired output – Spears May 12 at 3:40

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