55

Is there a way to get the tests inside of a TestCase to run in a certain order? For example, I want to separate the life cycle of an object from creation to use to destruction but I need to make sure that the object is set up first before I run the other tests.

  • 1
    You can add @depends as described in an answer below, and using setup() and teardown() is also a good idea, but tests are just run top to bottom... – Andrew Jun 10 '15 at 15:30
  • One additional use-case that doesn't seem to have been covered: Maybe all tests are atomic, but some tests are SLOW. I want the fast tests to be run ASAP so they can fail fast, and any slow tests to be run dead last, after I've already seen other problems and can get to them immediately. – Kzqai Mar 19 '16 at 21:31
49

Maybe there is a design problem in your tests.

Usually each test must not depend on any other tests, so they can run in any order.

Each test needs to instantiate and destroy everything it needs to run, that would be the perfect approach, you should never share objects and states between tests.

Can you be more specific about why you need the same object for N tests?

  • 44
    This doesn't seem correct to me. The point of a unit test is to test an entire unit. The point of having a unit is to group things together that have to depend on each other. Writing tests that test individual methods without the context for the class is akin to advocating procedural programming over oo because you're advocating that individual functions should not depend on the same data. – doliver May 4 '13 at 20:35
  • 4
    I disagree with your point of view. The output of an instantiation test is a valid object that can be used by other tests in your test suite. There's no need to instantiate a new object for each test, specially if the constructor is complicated. – pedromanoel Jul 12 '13 at 15:08
  • 6
    If the constructor is complicated you are doing something wrong, probably your class is doing too much. Please read about "SOLID", more specific about the "Single Responsibility Pattern (SRP)", also you should "fake" the dependencies in your tests using mocks, please read about "mocks, fakes and stubs" too. – Fabio Gomes Jul 13 '13 at 22:15
  • There may also be a practical reason. For instance, if the cleanup you need to do is particualrly time consuming, you might use the tearDownAfterClass function so as to only run it once. If one particular test requires a clean slate, then you either have to make sure that test gets run first, or manually call the tearDownAfterClass function at its start, causing it to be run twice. Yes, this is probably a sign that something is wrong with the test class design, but there are legitimate cases where ordering tests is useful. – Benubird Jul 23 '14 at 13:54
  • At least for database testing reusing objects (at least the connection) is often necessary. PHPUnit refers to that as well: phpunit.de/manual/current/en/database.html (see: Tip: Use your own Abstract Database TestCase) – emfi Jul 28 '17 at 8:12
135

PHPUnit supports test dependencies via the @depends annotation.

Here is an example from the documentation where tests will be run in an order that satisfies dependencies, with each dependent test passing an argument to the next:

class StackTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase
{
    public function testEmpty()
    {
        $stack = array();
        $this->assertEmpty($stack);

        return $stack;
    }

    /**
     * @depends testEmpty
     */
    public function testPush(array $stack)
    {
        array_push($stack, 'foo');
        $this->assertEquals('foo', $stack[count($stack)-1]);
        $this->assertNotEmpty($stack);

        return $stack;
    }

    /**
     * @depends testPush
     */
    public function testPop(array $stack)
    {
        $this->assertEquals('foo', array_pop($stack));
        $this->assertEmpty($stack);
    }
}

However, it's important to note that tests with unresolved dependencies will not be executed (desirable, as this brings attention quickly to the failing test). So, it's important to pay close attention when using dependencies.

  • 12
    For PHPUnit, this means the test function will be skipped if the previous test weren't executed. That does not create a test order. – Dereckson Feb 9 '14 at 19:12
  • 4
    Just to expand on @Dereckson, the @depends annotation will cause a test to be skipped if the test that is dependent on either hasn't been run yet or failed when it did run. – km6zla Aug 21 '14 at 0:39
  • 1
    Does not solve the problem with the test order – Gino Pane Jul 26 '17 at 9:58
  • @km6zla does that mean when we put or write testPop() method before testPush() in the file then testPop() would never be executed and get always skipped? – Top-Master Mar 28 at 6:34
12

The correct answer for this is a proper configuration file for tests. I had the same problem and fixed it by creating testsuite with necessary test files order:

phpunit.xml:

<phpunit
        colors="true"
        bootstrap="./tests/bootstrap.php"
        convertErrorsToExceptions="true"
        convertNoticesToExceptions="true"
        convertWarningsToExceptions="true"
        strict="true"
        stopOnError="false"
        stopOnFailure="false"
        stopOnIncomplete="false"
        stopOnSkipped="false"
        stopOnRisky="false"
>
    <testsuites>
        <testsuite name="Your tests">
            <file>file1</file> //this will be run before file2
            <file>file2</file> //this depends on file1
        </testsuite>
    </testsuites>
</phpunit>
  • i think this is the only reliable solution – emfi Jul 28 '17 at 8:15
  • 1
    Perfect! Not every test is a Unit test; when writing HTTP Request or Feature tests, for example, state changes may need to be preserved across test classes, and in such cases, this is the most reliable approach to running tests in a meaningful sequence. – Ben Johnson Aug 13 '18 at 15:49
8

If you want your tests to share various helper objects and settings, you can use setUp(), tearDown() to add to the sharedFixture property.

  • Can you still assertEquals(), etc in setUp()? Is that bad practice? – jchook Dec 17 '16 at 22:47
7

PHPUnit allows the use of '@depends' annotation which specifies dependent test cases and allows passing arguments between dependent test cases.

2

In my view, take the following scenario where I need to test creation and destroying of a particular resource.

Initially I had two methods, a. testCreateResource and b. testDestroyResource

a. testCreateResource

<?php
$app->createResource('resource');
$this->assertTrue($app->hasResource('resource'));
?>

b. testDestroyResource

<?php
$app->destroyResource('resource');
$this->assertFalse($app->hasResource('resource'));
?>

I think this is a bad idea, as testDestroyResource depends upon testCreateResource. And a better practice would be to do

a. testCreateResource

<?php
$app->createResource('resource');
$this->assertTrue($app->hasResource('resource'));
$app->deleteResource('resource');
?>

b. testDestroyResource

<?php
$app->createResource('resource');
$app->destroyResource('resource');
$this->assertFalse($app->hasResource('resource'));
?>
  • 3
    -1 In your second approach, destroyResource also depends on createResource, but it's not explicitly set as so. If createResource fails, the UTesting Framework will wrongly point out that destroyResource is not working – Tivie Nov 26 '13 at 22:33
2

Alternative solution: Use static(!) functions in your tests to create reusable elements. For instance (I use selenium IDE to record tests and phpunit-selenium (github) to run test inside browser)

class LoginTest extends SeleniumClearTestCase
{
    public function testAdminLogin()
    {
        self::adminLogin($this);
    }

    public function testLogout()
    {
        self::adminLogin($this);
        self::logout($this);
    }

    public static function adminLogin($t)
    {
        self::login($t, 'john.smith@gmail.com', 'pAs$w0rd');
        $t->assertEquals('John Smith', $t->getText('css=span.hidden-xs'));
    }

    // @source LoginTest.se
    public static function login($t, $login, $pass)
    {
        $t->open('/');
        $t->click("xpath=(//a[contains(text(),'Log In')])[2]");
        $t->waitForPageToLoad('30000');
        $t->type('name=email', $login);
        $t->type('name=password', $pass);
        $t->click("//button[@type='submit']");
        $t->waitForPageToLoad('30000');
    }

    // @source LogoutTest.se
    public static function logout($t)
    {
        $t->click('css=span.hidden-xs');
        $t->click('link=Logout');
        $t->waitForPageToLoad('30000');
        $t->assertEquals('PANEL', $t->getText("xpath=(//a[contains(text(),'Panel')])[2]"));
    }
}

Ok, and now, i can use this reusable elements in other test :) For instance:

class ChangeBlogTitleTest extends SeleniumClearTestCase
{
    public function testAddBlogTitle()
    {
      self::addBlogTitle($this,'I like my boobies');
      self::cleanAddBlogTitle();
    }

    public static function addBlogTitle($t,$title) {
      LoginTest::adminLogin($t);

      $t->click('link=ChangeTitle');
      ...
      $t->type('name=blog-title', $title);
      LoginTest::logout($t);
      LoginTest::login($t, 'paris@gmail.com','hilton');
      $t->screenshot(); // take some photos :)
      $t->assertEquals($title, $t->getText('...'));
    }

    public static function cleanAddBlogTitle() {
        $lastTitle = BlogTitlesHistory::orderBy('id')->first();
        $lastTitle->delete();
    }
  • In this way, you can build hierarchy of you tests.
  • You can steel keep property that each test case is totaly separate from other (if you clean DB after each test).
  • And most important, if for instance, the way of login change in future, you only modify LoginTest class, and you don'n need correct login part in other tests (they should work after update LoginTest) :)

When I run test my script clean up db ad the begining. Above I use my SeleniumClearTestCase class (I make screenshot() and other nice functions there) it is extension of MigrationToSelenium2 (from github, to port recorded tests in firefox using seleniumIDE + ff plugin "Selenium IDE: PHP Formatters" ) which is extension of my class LaravelTestCase (it is copy of Illuminate\Foundation\Testing\TestCase but not extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase) which setup laravel to have access to eloquent when we want to clean DB at the end of test) which is extension of PHPUnit_Extensions_Selenium2TestCase. To set up laravel eloquent I have also in SeleniumClearTestCase function createApplication (which is called at setUp, and I take this function from laral test/TestCase)

1

There really is a problem with your tests if they need to run in a certain order. Each test should be totally independent of the others: it helps you with defect localization, and allows you to get repeatable (and therefore debuggable) results.

Checkout this site for a whole load of ideas / information, about how to factor your tests in a manner where you avoid these kinds of issues.

  • 1
    PHPUnit supports test dependencies via @depends. – mjs Dec 16 '09 at 14:47

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