111

I've been looking for a way to get the terminal width from within my C program. What I keep coming up with is something along the lines of:

#include <sys/ioctl.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main (void)
{
    struct ttysize ts;
    ioctl(0, TIOCGSIZE, &ts);

    printf ("lines %d\n", ts.ts_lines);
    printf ("columns %d\n", ts.ts_cols);
}

But everytime I try that I get

austin@:~$ gcc test.c -o test
test.c: In function ‘main’:
test.c:6: error: storage size of ‘ts’ isn’t known
test.c:7: error: ‘TIOCGSIZE’ undeclared (first use in this function)
test.c:7: error: (Each undeclared identifier is reported only once
test.c:7: error: for each function it appears in.)

Is this the best way to do this, or is there a better way? If not how can I get this to work?

EDIT: fixed code is

#include <sys/ioctl.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main (void)
{
    struct winsize w;
    ioctl(0, TIOCGWINSZ, &w);

    printf ("lines %d\n", w.ws_row);
    printf ("columns %d\n", w.ws_col);
    return 0;
}
2
  • 1
    none of the suggested answers is more than half correct. Apr 18, 2019 at 8:10
  • 8
    @ThomasDickey, where's your answer then? Jul 15, 2019 at 6:42

8 Answers 8

148

Have you considered using getenv() ? It allows you to get the system's environment variables which contain the terminals columns and lines.

Alternatively using your method, if you want to see what the kernel sees as the terminal size (better in case terminal is resized), you would need to use TIOCGWINSZ, as opposed to your TIOCGSIZE, like so:

struct winsize w;
ioctl(STDOUT_FILENO, TIOCGWINSZ, &w);

and the full code:

#include <sys/ioctl.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main (int argc, char **argv)
{
    struct winsize w;
    ioctl(STDOUT_FILENO, TIOCGWINSZ, &w);

    printf ("lines %d\n", w.ws_row);
    printf ("columns %d\n", w.ws_col);
    return 0;  // make sure your main returns int
}
6
  • 8
    yeah but the term width is not an environmental variable, its static to the term.
    – austin
    Jun 21, 2009 at 1:42
  • 4
    It doesn't provide you the current terminal size, if someone resizes the terminal during the program's execution. Jun 21, 2009 at 1:42
  • 1
    @Debashish Depends. E.g. Linux doesn't support those fields at all.
    – melpomene
    Jul 5, 2019 at 22:07
  • 1
    Although we can see the LINES and COLUMNS variables in the environment, they don't seem to be exported. So not accessible from your C program. Jul 14, 2019 at 21:59
  • 1
    Just stumbled upon this answer, and my jaw dropped when I realized that getenv("COLUMNS") works perfectly when running under watch(1). So now I have a set of fallbacks, all from the TIOCWINSZ ioctl, to getenv if not a tty, down to the classic ANSI escape "move cursor to 9999,9999 and the query cursor pos. The last one works on serial consoles for embedded systems :)
    – troglobit
    Dec 23, 2020 at 8:54
19

This example is a bit on the lengthy side, but I believe it's the most portable way of detecting the terminal dimensions. This also handles resize events.

As tim and rlbond suggests, I'm using ncurses. It guarantees a great improvement in terminal compatability as compared to reading environment variables directly.

#include <ncurses.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <signal.h>

// SIGWINCH is called when the window is resized.
void handle_winch(int sig){
  signal(SIGWINCH, SIG_IGN);

  // Reinitialize the window to update data structures.
  endwin();
  initscr();
  refresh();
  clear();

  char tmp[128];
  sprintf(tmp, "%dx%d", COLS, LINES);

  // Approximate the center
  int x = COLS / 2 - strlen(tmp) / 2;
  int y = LINES / 2 - 1;

  mvaddstr(y, x, tmp);
  refresh();

  signal(SIGWINCH, handle_winch);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
  initscr();
  // COLS/LINES are now set

  signal(SIGWINCH, handle_winch);

  while(getch() != 27){
    /* Nada */
  }

  endwin();

  return(0);
}
6
  • 4
    But is it really safe to call initscr and endwin from a signal handler? They're at least not listed among the async-signal-safe APIs in man 7 signal
    – nav
    Aug 6, 2013 at 18:16
  • 1
    That's a good point @nav, I've never thought of that! Would a better solution perhaps be to have the signal handler raise a flag, and then perform the rest of the operations in the main loop?
    – gamen
    Oct 3, 2013 at 9:55
  • 1
    @gamen, yes, that would be better ;) - also using sigaction instead of signal would be better too. Jul 30, 2015 at 16:07
  • 1
    So are COLS and LINES global variables?
    – einpoklum
    Feb 28, 2016 at 12:12
  • 2
    @AlexisWilke: Including OK and ERR. How "kind" of them to help us fill that gap in our lives :-(
    – einpoklum
    Jul 15, 2019 at 8:10
13
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <termcap.h>
#include <error.h>

static char termbuf[2048];

int main(void)
{
    char *termtype = getenv("TERM");

    if (tgetent(termbuf, termtype) < 0) {
        error(EXIT_FAILURE, 0, "Could not access the termcap data base.\n");
    }

    int lines = tgetnum("li");
    int columns = tgetnum("co");
    printf("lines = %d; columns = %d.\n", lines, columns);
    return 0;
}

Needs to be compiled with -ltermcap . There is a lot of other useful information you can get using termcap. Check the termcap manual using info termcap for more details.

7
  • You can compile it with -lcurses too.
    – Kambus
    Apr 19, 2011 at 10:12
  • 2
    I know this comment comes 6 years after the fact, but please explain your magic number of 2048...
    – einpoklum
    Feb 20, 2016 at 14:35
  • 1
    @einpoklum This is nearly three years later yet, but isn't it fairly clear that 2048 is just an arbitrary size for the buffer that "should probably be big enough" for whatever input string is going there? Dec 12, 2018 at 6:32
  • 2
    Actually, this answer makes too many assumptions to be correct. May 8, 2019 at 8:26
  • 1
    For anyone curious, the 2048 buffer size is explained in the GNU termcap documentation here: gnu.org/software/termutils/manual/termcap-1.3/html_mono/… There's also a lot of other stuff in there people reading this post may find useful.
    – user5739133
    May 11, 2020 at 22:10
3

If you have ncurses installed and are using it, you can use getmaxyx() to find the dimensions of the terminal.

1
  • 2
    Yes, and do note that the Y comes first and then the X.
    – Daniel
    Mar 4, 2014 at 9:59
3

To add a more complete answer, what I've found to work for me is to use @John_T's solution with some bits added in from Rosetta Code, along with some troubleshooting figuring out dependencies. It might be a bit inefficient, but with smart programming you can make it work and not be opening your terminal file all the time.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/ioctl.h> // ioctl, TIOCGWINSZ
#include <err.h>       // err
#include <fcntl.h>     // open
#include <unistd.h>    // close
#include <termios.h>   // don't remember, but it's needed

size_t* get_screen_size()
{
  size_t* result = malloc(sizeof(size_t) * 2);
  if(!result) err(1, "Memory Error");

  struct winsize ws;
  int fd;

  fd = open("/dev/tty", 0_RDWR);
  if(fd < 0 || ioctl(fd, TIOCGWINSZ, &ws) < 0) err(8, "/dev/tty");

  result[0] = ws.ws_row;
  result[1] = ws.ws_col;

  close(fd);

  return result;
}

If you make sure not to call it all but maybe every once in awhile you should be fine, it should even update when the user resizes the terminal window (because you're opening the file and reading it every time).

If you aren't using TIOCGWINSZ see the first answer on this form https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/programming-9/get-width-height-of-a-terminal-window-in-c-810739/.

Oh, and don't forget to free() the result.

2
  • 3
    Why would you return size_t *? Just make a struct for that and return the struct value. This way there is no malloc() and no free() involved.
    – Mecki
    Jul 21, 2021 at 18:13
  • For people using this code: 0_RDWR in the call to open has to be O_RDWR (O insted of 0).
    – pschulz
    Jan 17 at 7:57
-1

Assuming you are on Linux, I think you want to use the ncurses library instead. I am pretty sure the ttysize stuff you have is not in stdlib.

2
  • well, what i'm doing isn't really worth setting up ncurses for
    – austin
    Jun 21, 2009 at 1:42
  • 2
    ncurses is not in stdlib either. Both are standardized in POSIX, but the ioctl way is simpler and cleaner, because you don't have to initialize curses, etc.
    – Gandaro
    May 3, 2014 at 22:17
-1

So not suggesting an answer here, but:

linux-pc:~/scratch$ echo $LINES

49

linux-pc:~/scratch$ printenv | grep LINES

linux-pc:~/scratch$

Ok, and I notice that if I resize the GNOME terminal, the LINES and COLUMNS variables follow that.

Kinda seems like GNOME terminal is creating these environment variables itself?

2
  • 2
    And sure enough it does not pass down to C code. getenv("LINES") returns NULL. Apr 18, 2019 at 6:47
  • Variables are a shell thing, not a terminal thing.
    – melpomene
    Jul 5, 2019 at 22:07
-3

Here are the function calls for the already suggested environmental variable thing:

int lines = atoi(getenv("LINES"));
int columns = atoi(getenv("COLUMNS"));
4
  • 12
    Environment variables are not reliable. These values are set by the shell, so they are not guaranteed to exist. Also, they won't be up to date if the user changes the terminal size.
    – Juliano
    Jun 21, 2009 at 2:20
  • 1
    Many shells establish a handler for the SIGWINCH signal, so they can keep the variables up to date (they also need it so they'll do proper line wrapping in the input editor).
    – Barmar
    Jul 8, 2014 at 16:11
  • 5
    They may well do that, but a program's environment won't be updated as it's running.
    – Functino
    Apr 10, 2015 at 16:15
  • Of course, that code is very likely to crash since you do not test whether getenv() returns NULL or not and it does in my Linux terminal (because those variables are not exported.) Also even if the shell updates those variables, you would not see the changes while your program is running (not without you having your own SIGWINCH handler). Jul 14, 2019 at 23:13

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