6

I'm building a form in a C# WinRT app, and I'd like to restrict the characters in one of the TextBox components to numerals only. (This TextBox would be for a user to enter a year into.)

I've searched for a while, but haven't been able to figure this one out without setting up an event listener on the TextChanged event, and inspecting the text property on every key press. Is there a way to simply say that a user can only enter specific characters into a TextBox?

8

The simplest thing that could possibly work is to bind to the OnTextChanged event and modify the text according to your rules.

    <TextBox x:Name="TheText" TextChanged="OnTextChanged" MaxLength="4"/>
    private void OnTextChanged(object sender, TextChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (TheText.Text.Length == 0) return;

        var text = TheText.Text;

        int result;
        var isValid = int.TryParse(text, out result);
        if (isValid) return;

        TheText.Text = text.Remove(text.Length - 1);
        TheText.SelectionStart = text.Length;
    }

However, I'd shy away from this approach since the mantra of Metro is touch first UI and you can easy do it in a touch first manner with a FlipView control.

  • Marking this as the answer as it mostly solves the problem I was having. This will restrict the TextBox to only displaying numbers. However, I've since revisited this part of my app, and replaced the year field with a ComboBox, to sidestep the problem entirely. (I've got a fixed range of years possible, so I don't know why I didn't use a ComboBox in the first place.) – Josh Buhler Apr 26 '12 at 4:19
6

Try setting TextBox.InputScope property to InputScopeNameValue.Number, as mentioned in Guidelines and checklist for text input in MSDN.

  • This is cool, and (sort-of) exists in WPF as well. Didn't know about this one. Thanks! – Avner Shahar-Kashtan Apr 20 '12 at 8:10
  • 1
    This kinda works, but won't do exactly what I'm trying to accomplish. It looks like the InputScope property serves more as a hint to the system as to which soft keyboard the system should display, but it won't create a masked TextBox that limits the inputs. (Finally found this thread in the MSDN forums - link below, see post from Chipalo Street, from Thursday, March 22, 2012 5:49 PM). social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/winappswithcsharp/thread/… – Josh Buhler Apr 23 '12 at 14:14
  • Ah, seems like I misunderstood the documentation. Thanks for pointing this out. – sdb Apr 24 '12 at 7:50
0

Valid Year

DateTime newDate;
var validYear = DateTime.TryParseExact("2012", "yyyy", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, 
DateTimeStyles.None, out newDate); //valid

Invalid Year

var validYear = DateTime.TryParseExact("0000", "yyyy", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, 
DateTimeStyles.None, out newDate); //invalid
0

This seems to work for me:

    private void TextBox_KeyDown(object sender, KeyRoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        if ((e.Key < VirtualKey.Number0) || (e.Key > VirtualKey.Number9))
        {
            // If it's not a numeric character, prevent the TextBox from handling the keystroke
            e.Handled = true;
        }
    }

See the documentation for the VirtualKey enumeration for all the values.

0

Based on a posting at link, adding the tab to allow navigation.

private void decimalTextBox_KeyDown(object sender, KeyRoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        bool isGoodData;    // flag to make the flow clearer.
        TextBox theTextBox = (TextBox)sender;  // the sender is a textbox

        if (e.Key>= Windows.System.VirtualKey.Number0 && e.Key <= Windows.System.VirtualKey.Number9)  // allow digits
            isGoodData = true;
        else if (e.Key == Windows.System.VirtualKey.Tab)
            isGoodData = true; 
        else if (e.Key >= Windows.System.VirtualKey.NumberPad0 && e.Key <= Windows.System.VirtualKey.NumberPad9)  // allow digits
            isGoodData = true;
        else if (e.Key == Windows.System.VirtualKey.Decimal || (int)e.Key == 190)   // character is a decimal point, 190 is the keyboard period code
                                                                                    // which is not in the VirtualKey enumeration
        {
            if (theTextBox.Text.Contains("."))   // search for a current point
                isGoodData = false;    // only 1 decimal point allowed
            else
                isGoodData = true;     // this is the only one.
        }
        else if (e.Key == Windows.System.VirtualKey.Back)  // allow backspace
            isGoodData = true;
        else
            isGoodData = false;   // everything else is bad
        if (!isGoodData)          // mark bad data as handled
            e.Handled = true;
    }
  • 1
    Shift-4, which should be a dollar sign, is not filtered out with this code. The 4 key is seen and accepted as a digit. See this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/13001215/… where various methods are shown for detecting the shift, control, etc., keys. – David Rector Jan 19 '15 at 0:57
-2

Use a MaskedTextBox control. For numerals only, just use the Mask property to specify the characters and the length, if any. e.g. if you want only five numbers to be entered, you set the mask property to "00000". Simple as that. Windows handles the restriction for you.

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