I am looking for a .NET implementation of a priority queue or heap data structure

Priority queues are data structures that provide more flexibility than simple sorting, because they allow new elements to enter a system at arbitrary intervals. It is much more cost-effective to insert a new job into a priority queue than to re-sort everything on each such arrival.

The basic priority queue supports three primary operations:

  • Insert(Q,x). Given an item x with key k, insert it into the priority queue Q.
  • Find-Minimum(Q). Return a pointer to the item whose key value is smaller than any other key in the priority queue Q.
  • Delete-Minimum(Q). Remove the item from the priority queue Q whose key is minimum

Unless I am looking in the wrong place, there isn't one in the framework. Is anyone aware of a good one, or should I roll my own?

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  • 31
    FYI I've developed an easy-to-use, highly optimized C# priority-queue, which can be found here. It was developed specifically for pathfinding applications (A*, etc.), but should work perfectly for any other application as well. I would post this as an answer, but the question has recently been closed... – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jul 25 '13 at 20:32
  • 1
    ParallelExtensionsExtras has a ConcurrentPriorityQueue code.msdn.microsoft.com/ParExtSamples – VoteCoffee Sep 18 '14 at 18:04
  • Shamelessly introduce PriorityQueue, as part of effort to port java concurrent API to .net for Spring.Net. It's both a heap and queue with full generic support. Binary can be downloaded here. – Kenneth Xu Dec 14 '14 at 1:08
  • @BlueRaja-DannyPflughoeft Could you add that an an answer? – mafu Nov 20 '16 at 2:33
  • Just to summarize. There're no heap data structure in .net, neither in .net core now. Though Array.Sort users it for large numbers. Internal implementations exist. – Artyom Oct 17 '17 at 9:48

14 Answers 14

up vote 37 down vote accepted

I like using the OrderedBag and OrderedSet classes in PowerCollections as priority queues.

  • 57
    OrderedBag/OrderedSet do more work than necessary, they use a red-black tree instead of a heap. – Dan Berindei Nov 20 '09 at 14:08
  • 3
    @DanBerindei: not necessary work if you need make running calculation (delete old items), heap only support deleting min or max – Svisstack Jul 27 '14 at 12:09

You might like IntervalHeap from the C5 Generic Collection Library. To quote the user guide

Class IntervalHeap<T> implements interface IPriorityQueue<T> using an interval heap stored as an array of pairs. The FindMin and FindMax operations, and the indexer’s get-accessor, take time O(1). The DeleteMin, DeleteMax, Add and Update operations, and the indexer’s set-accessor, take time O(log n). In contrast to an ordinary priority queue, an interval heap offers both minimum and maximum operations with the same efficiency.

The API is simple enough

> var heap = new C5.IntervalHeap<int>();
> heap.Add(10);
> heap.Add(5);
> heap.FindMin();
5

Install from Nuget https://www.nuget.org/packages/C5 or GitHub https://github.com/sestoft/C5/

  • 3
    This looks to be a very solid library and it comes with 1400 unit tests. – ECC-Dan Mar 26 '13 at 14:16
  • yes but does not work out of the box – sebas Oct 25 '13 at 16:32
  • 2
    @sebas What doesn't work out of the box? I've used it extensively with much success. Never had problems with it. – Mikkel R. Lund Jan 7 '14 at 23:43
  • 2
    hmm I do not remember...I may have wrote that comment just taking in consideration my personal experience, but I do not remember what was wrong with it. I hope I did not write that comment because I am actually using .net 3.5. – sebas Jan 8 '14 at 13:13
  • I tried to use it but it has serious flaws. IntervalHeap does not have a built-in concept of priority and forces you to implement IComparable or IComparer making it a sorted collection not a "Priority". Even worse there is no direct way to update priority of some previous entry!!! – morteza khosravi Mar 9 at 19:21

Here's my attempt at a .NET heap

public abstract class Heap<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
    private const int InitialCapacity = 0;
    private const int GrowFactor = 2;
    private const int MinGrow = 1;

    private int _capacity = InitialCapacity;
    private T[] _heap = new T[InitialCapacity];
    private int _tail = 0;

    public int Count { get { return _tail; } }
    public int Capacity { get { return _capacity; } }

    protected Comparer<T> Comparer { get; private set; }
    protected abstract bool Dominates(T x, T y);

    protected Heap() : this(Comparer<T>.Default)
    {
    }

    protected Heap(Comparer<T> comparer) : this(Enumerable.Empty<T>(), comparer)
    {
    }

    protected Heap(IEnumerable<T> collection)
        : this(collection, Comparer<T>.Default)
    {
    }

    protected Heap(IEnumerable<T> collection, Comparer<T> comparer)
    {
        if (collection == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("collection");
        if (comparer == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("comparer");

        Comparer = comparer;

        foreach (var item in collection)
        {
            if (Count == Capacity)
                Grow();

            _heap[_tail++] = item;
        }

        for (int i = Parent(_tail - 1); i >= 0; i--)
            BubbleDown(i);
    }

    public void Add(T item)
    {
        if (Count == Capacity)
            Grow();

        _heap[_tail++] = item;
        BubbleUp(_tail - 1);
    }

    private void BubbleUp(int i)
    {
        if (i == 0 || Dominates(_heap[Parent(i)], _heap[i])) 
            return; //correct domination (or root)

        Swap(i, Parent(i));
        BubbleUp(Parent(i));
    }

    public T GetMin()
    {
        if (Count == 0) throw new InvalidOperationException("Heap is empty");
        return _heap[0];
    }

    public T ExtractDominating()
    {
        if (Count == 0) throw new InvalidOperationException("Heap is empty");
        T ret = _heap[0];
        _tail--;
        Swap(_tail, 0);
        BubbleDown(0);
        return ret;
    }

    private void BubbleDown(int i)
    {
        int dominatingNode = Dominating(i);
        if (dominatingNode == i) return;
        Swap(i, dominatingNode);
        BubbleDown(dominatingNode);
    }

    private int Dominating(int i)
    {
        int dominatingNode = i;
        dominatingNode = GetDominating(YoungChild(i), dominatingNode);
        dominatingNode = GetDominating(OldChild(i), dominatingNode);

        return dominatingNode;
    }

    private int GetDominating(int newNode, int dominatingNode)
    {
        if (newNode < _tail && !Dominates(_heap[dominatingNode], _heap[newNode]))
            return newNode;
        else
            return dominatingNode;
    }

    private void Swap(int i, int j)
    {
        T tmp = _heap[i];
        _heap[i] = _heap[j];
        _heap[j] = tmp;
    }

    private static int Parent(int i)
    {
        return (i + 1)/2 - 1;
    }

    private static int YoungChild(int i)
    {
        return (i + 1)*2 - 1;
    }

    private static int OldChild(int i)
    {
        return YoungChild(i) + 1;
    }

    private void Grow()
    {
        int newCapacity = _capacity*GrowFactor + MinGrow;
        var newHeap = new T[newCapacity];
        Array.Copy(_heap, newHeap, _capacity);
        _heap = newHeap;
        _capacity = newCapacity;
    }

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _heap.Take(Count).GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }
}

public class MaxHeap<T> : Heap<T>
{
    public MaxHeap()
        : this(Comparer<T>.Default)
    {
    }

    public MaxHeap(Comparer<T> comparer)
        : base(comparer)
    {
    }

    public MaxHeap(IEnumerable<T> collection, Comparer<T> comparer)
        : base(collection, comparer)
    {
    }

    public MaxHeap(IEnumerable<T> collection) : base(collection)
    {
    }

    protected override bool Dominates(T x, T y)
    {
        return Comparer.Compare(x, y) >= 0;
    }
}

public class MinHeap<T> : Heap<T>
{
    public MinHeap()
        : this(Comparer<T>.Default)
    {
    }

    public MinHeap(Comparer<T> comparer)
        : base(comparer)
    {
    }

    public MinHeap(IEnumerable<T> collection) : base(collection)
    {
    }

    public MinHeap(IEnumerable<T> collection, Comparer<T> comparer)
        : base(collection, comparer)
    {
    }

    protected override bool Dominates(T x, T y)
    {
        return Comparer.Compare(x, y) <= 0;
    }
}

Some tests:

[TestClass]
public class HeapTests
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void TestHeapBySorting()
    {
        var minHeap = new MinHeap<int>(new[] {9, 8, 4, 1, 6, 2, 7, 4, 1, 2});
        AssertHeapSort(minHeap, minHeap.OrderBy(i => i).ToArray());

        minHeap = new MinHeap<int> { 7, 5, 1, 6, 3, 2, 4, 1, 2, 1, 3, 4, 7 };
        AssertHeapSort(minHeap, minHeap.OrderBy(i => i).ToArray());

        var maxHeap = new MaxHeap<int>(new[] {1, 5, 3, 2, 7, 56, 3, 1, 23, 5, 2, 1});
        AssertHeapSort(maxHeap, maxHeap.OrderBy(d => -d).ToArray());

        maxHeap = new MaxHeap<int> {2, 6, 1, 3, 56, 1, 4, 7, 8, 23, 4, 5, 7, 34, 1, 4};
        AssertHeapSort(maxHeap, maxHeap.OrderBy(d => -d).ToArray());
    }

    private static void AssertHeapSort(Heap<int> heap, IEnumerable<int> expected)
    {
        var sorted = new List<int>();
        while (heap.Count > 0)
            sorted.Add(heap.ExtractDominating());

        Assert.IsTrue(sorted.SequenceEqual(expected));
    }
}
  • Thanks! Glad you liked it. I have some more similarly implemented data structures if you're interested (most of them posted around SO I think) – Ohad Schneider Apr 17 '13 at 11:48
  • 2
    I would recommend clearing the heap value in ExtractDominating, so it doesn't hold on to the referenced object longer than necessary (potential memory leak). For value types it obviously is of no concern. – Wout Aug 3 '15 at 11:03
  • 4
    Nice but you can't remove items from it? That's an important operation for priority queues. – Tom Larkworthy Aug 5 '16 at 22:05
  • It looks like the underlying object is an array. Wouldn't this be better as a binary tree? – Grunion Shaftoe Jun 26 at 17:03

here's one i just wrote, maybe it's not as optimized (just uses a sorted dictionary) but simple to understand. you can insert objects of different kinds, so no generic queues.

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace PrioQueue
{
    public class PrioQueue
    {
        int total_size;
        SortedDictionary<int, Queue> storage;

        public PrioQueue ()
        {
            this.storage = new SortedDictionary<int, Queue> ();
            this.total_size = 0;
        }

        public bool IsEmpty ()
        {
            return (total_size == 0);
        }

        public object Dequeue ()
        {
            if (IsEmpty ()) {
                throw new Exception ("Please check that priorityQueue is not empty before dequeing");
            } else
                foreach (Queue q in storage.Values) {
                    // we use a sorted dictionary
                    if (q.Count > 0) {
                        total_size--;
                        return q.Dequeue ();
                    }
                }

                Debug.Assert(false,"not supposed to reach here. problem with changing total_size");

                return null; // not supposed to reach here.
        }

        // same as above, except for peek.

        public object Peek ()
        {
            if (IsEmpty ())
                throw new Exception ("Please check that priorityQueue is not empty before peeking");
            else
                foreach (Queue q in storage.Values) {
                    if (q.Count > 0)
                        return q.Peek ();
                }

                Debug.Assert(false,"not supposed to reach here. problem with changing total_size");

                return null; // not supposed to reach here.
        }

        public object Dequeue (int prio)
        {
            total_size--;
            return storage[prio].Dequeue ();
        }

        public void Enqueue (object item, int prio)
        {
            if (!storage.ContainsKey (prio)) {
                storage.Add (prio, new Queue ());
              }
            storage[prio].Enqueue (item);
            total_size++;

        }
    }
}
  • this doesnt allow for multiple entries with the same priority though? – Letseatlunch Apr 16 '11 at 16:39
  • 2
    it does. when you invoke the Enqueue method, it will add the item to the queue of that priority. (the part in else in the enqueue method.) – kobi7 Apr 19 '11 at 17:06
  • 5
    What do you mean by "it's not really a priority queue in the computer science meaning"? What about it makes you believe that this isn't a priority queue? – Mark Byers Feb 23 '12 at 12:30
  • 12
    -1 for not using generics. – cdiggins Jan 1 '13 at 20:49
  • 2
    One of the biggest benefits of Heap/PriorityQueue is the O(1) complexity of min/max extraction, i.e. the Peek operation. And here it involves enumerator setup, for-loop, etc. Why!? Also, the "Enqueue" operation rather than being O(logN) - another key feature of the heap, has one O(longN) swipe because of "ContainsKey", a second one (again O(longN)) to add the Queue entry (if needed), a third one to actually retrieve the Queue (the storage[prio] line), and finally a linear adding to that queue. This is truly insane in the light of core algorithm implementation. – Jonan Georgiev Nov 23 '16 at 10:09

I found one by Julian Bucknall on his blog here - http://www.boyet.com/Articles/PriorityQueueCSharp3.html

We modified it slightly so that low-priority items on the queue would eventually 'bubble-up' to the top over time, so they wouldn't suffer starvation.

You may find useful this implementation: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/126751/Priority-queue-in-Csharp-with-help-of-heap-data-st.aspx

it is generic and based on heap data structure

class PriorityQueue<T>
{
    IComparer<T> comparer;
    T[] heap;
    public int Count { get; private set; }
    public PriorityQueue() : this(null) { }
    public PriorityQueue(int capacity) : this(capacity, null) { }
    public PriorityQueue(IComparer<T> comparer) : this(16, comparer) { }
    public PriorityQueue(int capacity, IComparer<T> comparer)
    {
        this.comparer = (comparer == null) ? Comparer<T>.Default : comparer;
        this.heap = new T[capacity];
    }
    public void push(T v)
    {
        if (Count >= heap.Length) Array.Resize(ref heap, Count * 2);
        heap[Count] = v;
        SiftUp(Count++);
    }
    public T pop()
    {
        var v = top();
        heap[0] = heap[--Count];
        if (Count > 0) SiftDown(0);
        return v;
    }
    public T top()
    {
        if (Count > 0) return heap[0];
        throw new InvalidOperationException("优先队列为空");
    }
    void SiftUp(int n)
    {
        var v = heap[n];
        for (var n2 = n / 2; n > 0 && comparer.Compare(v, heap[n2]) > 0; n = n2, n2 /= 2) heap[n] = heap[n2];
        heap[n] = v;
    }
    void SiftDown(int n)
    {
        var v = heap[n];
        for (var n2 = n * 2; n2 < Count; n = n2, n2 *= 2)
        {
            if (n2 + 1 < Count && comparer.Compare(heap[n2 + 1], heap[n2]) > 0) n2++;
            if (comparer.Compare(v, heap[n2]) >= 0) break;
            heap[n] = heap[n2];
        }
        heap[n] = v;
    }
}

easy.

  • 7
    Sometimes I see stuff like for (var n2 = n / 2; n > 0 && comparer.Compare(v, heap[n2]) > 0; n = n2, n2 /= 2) heap[n] = heap[n2]; and wonder if it was worth one-lining – user2761580 May 15 '17 at 12:43
  • @DustinBreakey personal style :) – Shimou Dong May 16 '17 at 2:09
  • but definitely not readable to others. Consider writing code which does not leave a question mark floating on top of the developer's head. – alzaimar Mar 18 at 9:30

As mentioned in Microsoft Collections for .NET, Microsoft has written (and shared online) 2 internal PriorityQueue classes within the .NET Framework. Their code is available to try out.

EDIT: As @mathusum-mut commented, there is a bug in one of Microsoft's internal PriorityQueue classes (the SO community has, of course, provided fixes for it): Bug in Microsoft's internal PriorityQueue<T>?

  • 8
    A bug was found in one of the implementations here: stackoverflow.com/questions/44221454/… – MathuSum Mut May 27 '17 at 21:11
  • ohh! I can see that all these classes PriorityQueue<T> in shared source of Microsoft are marked with internal access specifier. So they are used only by the internal functionalities of the framework. They aren't available for general consumption just by referring windowsbase.dll in a C# project. Only way is to copy the shared source into project itself inside a class file. – RBT Jan 2 at 11:56

Use a Java to C# translator on the Java implementation (java.util.PriorityQueue) in the Java Collections framework, or more intelligently use the algorithm and core code and plug it into a C# class of your own making that adheres to the C# Collections framework API for Queues, or at least Collections.

  • This works, but unfortunately IKVM doesn't support Java generics, so you lose type safety. – Mechanical snail Nov 8 '12 at 4:34
  • 8
    There is no such thing as "Java generics" when you're dealing with compiled Java bytecode. IKVM can't support it. – Mark Dec 7 '12 at 21:57

Here is the another implementation from NGenerics team:

NGenerics PriorityQueue

AlgoKit

I wrote an open source library called AlgoKit, available via NuGet. It contains:

  • Implicit d-ary heaps (ArrayHeap),
  • Binomial heaps,
  • Pairing heaps.

The code has been extensively tested. I definitely recommend you to give it a try.

Example

var comparer = Comparer<int>.Default;
var heap = new PairingHeap<int, string>(comparer);

heap.Add(3, "your");
heap.Add(5, "of");
heap.Add(7, "disturbing.");
heap.Add(2, "find");
heap.Add(1, "I");
heap.Add(6, "faith");
heap.Add(4, "lack");

while (!heap.IsEmpty)
    Console.WriteLine(heap.Pop().Value);

Why those three heaps?

The optimal choice of implementation is strongly input-dependent — as Larkin, Sen, and Tarjan show in A back-to-basics empirical study of priority queues, arXiv:1403.0252v1 [cs.DS]. They tested implicit d-ary heaps, pairing heaps, Fibonacci heaps, binomial heaps, explicit d-ary heaps, rank-pairing heaps, quake heaps, violation heaps, rank-relaxed weak heaps, and strict Fibonacci heaps.

AlgoKit features three types of heaps that appeared to be most efficient among those tested.

Hint on choice

For a relatively small number of elements, you would likely be interested in using implicit heaps, especially quaternary heaps (implicit 4-ary). In case of operating on larger heap sizes, amortized structures like binomial heaps and pairing heaps should perform better.

I had the same issue recently and ended up creating a NuGet package for this.

This implements a standard heap-based priority queue. It also has all the usual niceties of the BCL collections: ICollection<T> and IReadOnlyCollection<T> implementation, custom IComparer<T> support, ability to specify an initial capacity, and a DebuggerTypeProxy to make the collection easier to work with in the debugger.

There is also an Inline version of the package which just installs a single .cs file into your project (useful if you want to avoid taking externally-visible dependencies).

More information is available on the github page.

A Simple Max Heap Implementation.

https://github.com/bharathkumarms/AlgorithmsMadeEasy/blob/master/AlgorithmsMadeEasy/MaxHeap.cs

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace AlgorithmsMadeEasy
{
    class MaxHeap
    {
        private static int capacity = 10;
        private int size = 0;
        int[] items = new int[capacity];

        private int getLeftChildIndex(int parentIndex) { return 2 * parentIndex + 1; }
        private int getRightChildIndex(int parentIndex) { return 2 * parentIndex + 2; }
        private int getParentIndex(int childIndex) { return (childIndex - 1) / 2; }

        private int getLeftChild(int parentIndex) { return this.items[getLeftChildIndex(parentIndex)]; }
        private int getRightChild(int parentIndex) { return this.items[getRightChildIndex(parentIndex)]; }
        private int getParent(int childIndex) { return this.items[getParentIndex(childIndex)]; }

        private bool hasLeftChild(int parentIndex) { return getLeftChildIndex(parentIndex) < size; }
        private bool hasRightChild(int parentIndex) { return getRightChildIndex(parentIndex) < size; }
        private bool hasParent(int childIndex) { return getLeftChildIndex(childIndex) > 0; }

        private void swap(int indexOne, int indexTwo)
        {
            int temp = this.items[indexOne];
            this.items[indexOne] = this.items[indexTwo];
            this.items[indexTwo] = temp;
        }

        private void hasEnoughCapacity()
        {
            if (this.size == capacity)
            {
                Array.Resize(ref this.items,capacity*2);
                capacity *= 2;
            }
        }

        public void Add(int item)
        {
            this.hasEnoughCapacity();
            this.items[size] = item;
            this.size++;
            heapifyUp();
        }

        public int Remove()
        {
            int item = this.items[0];
            this.items[0] = this.items[size-1];
            this.items[this.size - 1] = 0;
            size--;
            heapifyDown();
            return item;
        }

        private void heapifyUp()
        {
            int index = this.size - 1;
            while (hasParent(index) && this.items[index] > getParent(index))
            {
                swap(index, getParentIndex(index));
                index = getParentIndex(index);
            }
        }

        private void heapifyDown()
        {
            int index = 0;
            while (hasLeftChild(index))
            {
                int bigChildIndex = getLeftChildIndex(index);
                if (hasRightChild(index) && getLeftChild(index) < getRightChild(index))
                {
                    bigChildIndex = getRightChildIndex(index);
                }

                if (this.items[bigChildIndex] < this.items[index])
                {
                    break;
                }
                else
                {
                    swap(bigChildIndex,index);
                    index = bigChildIndex;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

/*
Calling Code:
    MaxHeap mh = new MaxHeap();
    mh.Add(10);
    mh.Add(5);
    mh.Add(2);
    mh.Add(1);
    mh.Add(50);
    int maxVal  = mh.Remove();
    int newMaxVal = mh.Remove();
*/

The following implementation of a PriorityQueue uses SortedSet from the System library.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace CDiggins
{
    interface IPriorityQueue<T, K> where K : IComparable<K>
    {
        bool Empty { get; }
        void Enqueue(T x, K key);
        void Dequeue();
        T Top { get; }
    }

    class PriorityQueue<T, K> : IPriorityQueue<T, K> where K : IComparable<K>
    {
        SortedSet<Tuple<T, K>> set;

        class Comparer : IComparer<Tuple<T, K>> {
            public int Compare(Tuple<T, K> x, Tuple<T, K> y) {
                return x.Item2.CompareTo(y.Item2);
            }
        }

        PriorityQueue() { set = new SortedSet<Tuple<T, K>>(new Comparer()); }
        public bool Empty { get { return set.Count == 0;  } }
        public void Enqueue(T x, K key) { set.Add(Tuple.Create(x, key)); }
        public void Dequeue() { set.Remove(set.Max); }
        public T Top { get { return set.Max.Item1; } }
    }
}
  • 6
    SortedSet.Add will fail (and return false) if you already have an item in the set with the same "priority" as the item you are trying to add. So...if A.Compare(B) == 0 and A is already in the list, your PriorityQueue.Enqueue function will silently fail. – Joseph Mar 4 '13 at 21:22
  • Mind to explain what are T x and K key ? I'm guessing this is a trick to allowing duplicate T x, and I need to generate an unique key (e.g. UUID) ? – Thariq Nugrohotomo Jan 29 at 1:20

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