63

I need to change the following if's to a switch-case while checking for a String, to improve the cyclomatic complexity.

String value = some methodx;
if ("apple".equals(value)) {
    method1;
}

if ("carrot".equals(value)) {
    method2;
}

if ("mango".equals(value)) {
    method3;
}

if ("orange".equals(value)) {
    method4;
}

But I am not sure what value I'm going to get.

9
  • 1
    'if' is not a loop, its a statement to test some condition
    – Habib
    Apr 20, 2012 at 5:04
  • 3
    if loop? really? In order to use switch statement, you have to install jdk7. stackoverflow.com/questions/338206/… Apr 20, 2012 at 5:04
  • 2
    PS.. changing to a switch statement will do nothing for your complexity.. It is still the same number of paths. Just implemented differently.
    – baash05
    Apr 20, 2012 at 5:25
  • 1
    since efficiency came into question, afk else if would be better instead from the second "if" onwards
    – ılǝ
    May 16, 2013 at 1:29
  • 1
    better to use else if ladder than multiple if.... May 21, 2014 at 5:38

13 Answers 13

176

Java (before version 7) does not support String in switch/case. But you can achieve the desired result by using an enum.

private enum Fruit {
    apple, carrot, mango, orange;
}

String value; // assume input
Fruit fruit = Fruit.valueOf(value); // surround with try/catch

switch(fruit) {
    case apple:
        method1;
        break;
    case carrot:
        method2;
        break;
    // etc...
}
4
  • 1
    I voted this up, but.. it would be slower than your if "loop".. It is AFK the best approach.
    – baash05
    Apr 20, 2012 at 5:14
  • i have a problem, my "value" is not a constant and this solution is giving me problems. Is there any solution???
    – guelo
    Jun 18, 2014 at 7:51
  • "value" is not a constant in this example - it varies depending on the user input. It should correspond to a known list of possible values (defined by the enum) but doesn't have to, as any "unknown" value can be caught by the try/catch statement and processed there.
    – nickdos
    Jun 18, 2014 at 23:59
  • A switch does not reduce cyclomatic complexity (at least as PMD computes it). You have to use an enum and put "command" style class references in a map or the method in the enum itself. I just dealt with a similar case yesterday. Sep 5, 2014 at 16:34
26

Everybody is using at least Java 7 now, right? Here is the answer to the original problem:

String myString = getFruitString();

switch (myString) {

    case "apple":
        method1();
        break;

    case "carrot":
        method2();
        break;

    case "mango":
        method3();
        break;

    case "orange":
        method4();
        break;
}

Notes

  • The case statements are equivalent to using String.equals.
  • As usual, String matching is case sensitive.
  • According to the docs, this is generally faster than using chained if-else statements (as in cHao's answer).
20

Learn to use else.

Since value will never be equal to two unequal strings at once, there are only 5 possible outcomes -- one for each value you care about, plus one for "none of the above". But because your code doesn't eliminate the tests that can't pass, it has 16 "possible" paths (2 ^ the number of tests), of which most will never be followed.

With else, the only paths that exist are the 5 that can actually happen.

String value = some methodx;
if ("apple".equals(value )) {
    method1;
}
else if ("carrot".equals(value )) {
    method2;
}
else if ("mango".equals(value )) {
    method3;
}
else if ("orance".equals(value )) {
    method4;
}

Or start using JDK 7, which includes the ability to use strings in a switch statement. Course, Java will just compile the switch into an if/else like construct anyway...

4
  • 3
    It actually performs a switch on the hashcode and then performs if/else to resolve hashcode collisions. Nov 27, 2013 at 14:35
  • 1
    if else is slow :(
    – Maveňツ
    Aug 11, 2014 at 11:55
  • 2
    @Mann: if without else is even slower, on average. (It'd try every comparison every time. The else is what allows you to finish early once you've found a match.) The cleanest way would indeed be to use a switch, which allows for optimizations like the one mentioned in the comment before yours. But that's not an option in versions of Java before 1.7.
    – cHao
    Aug 11, 2014 at 13:43
  • 2
    Here it is recommended to use a switch... docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/guides/language/… Nov 27, 2015 at 11:49
7

To reduce cyclomatic complexity use a map:

Map<String,Callable<Object>> map = new HashMap < > ( ) ;
map . put ( "apple" , new Callable<Object> () { public Object call ( method1 ( ) ; return null ; } ) ;
...
map . get ( x ) . call ( ) ;

or polymorphism

2

Just to make concrete emory's answer, the executable code is the following :

  Map<String,Callable<USer>> map = new HashMap<String,Callable<User>>();
  map.put( "test" , new Callable<User> () { public User call (){ return fillUser("test" ); }} ) ;
  map.put( "admin" , new Callable<Utente> () { public Utente call (){  return fillUser("admin" ); }} ) ;

where user is a POJO, and then

  User user = map.get(USERNAME).call();

finally the called method is somewhere :

 private User fillUser(String x){        
        User user = new User();
        // set something in User
        return user;
}
0

Java does not support Switch-case with String. I guess this link can help you. :)

0

Here is a possible pre-1.7 way, which I can't recommend:

public class PoorSwitch
{
    final static public int poorHash (String s) {
        long l = 0L;
        for (char c: s.toCharArray ()) {
            l = 97*l + c;
        }
        return (int) l;
    }

    public static void main (String args[])
    {
        String param = "foo";
        if (args.length == 1)
        {
            param = args[0];
        }
        // uncomment these lines, to evaluate your hash
        // test ("foo");
        // test ("bar");
        switch (poorHash (param)) {
            // this doesn't work, since you need a literal constant
            // so we have to evaluate our hash beforehand:
            // case poorHash ("foo"): {
            case 970596: {
                System.out.println ("Foo!");
                break;
            }
            // case poorHash ("bar"): {
            case 931605: {
                System.out.println ("Bar!");
                break;
            }
            default: {
                System.out.println ("unknown\t" + param);
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    public static void test (String s)
    {
        System.out.println ("Hash:\t " + s + " =\t" + poorHash (s));
    }
}

Maybe you could work with such a trick in a generated code. Else I can't recommend it. Not so much that the possibility of a hash collision makes me worry, but if something is mixed up (cut and paste), it is hard to find the error. 931605 is not a good documentation.

Take it just as proof of concept, as curiosity.

3
  • This is similar to what a HashMap does internally. But a HashMap has code to deal with the (remote) possibility of a collision. A HashMap hides the complexity and reduces cyclomatic complexity.
    – emory
    Apr 20, 2012 at 16:18
  • A HashMap has, but the hashcode hasn't. You could be right if suggesting to use the well established, tested Java "foo".hashCode (), but is there a guarantee it will never change? Is the value/the algorithm guaranteed like a public API? If you provide your own hashCode, you have at least control over it. Apr 20, 2012 at 16:48
  • There is a guaranty that "foo".hashCode() will always return the same value. Simply because Java7+ code using switch over string compiles to code assuming exactly that invariant property. So it can’t change in future versions and it’s even simpler to see that the algorithm hasn’t changed from Java 1.0 to Java 7 either. But your code should use equals within the case statements to protect against hash collisions.
    – Holger
    Jul 26, 2018 at 18:01
0

We can apply Switch just on data type compatible int :short,Shor,byte,Byte,int,Integer,char,Character or enum type.

0

Evaluating String variables with a switch statement have been implemented in Java SE 7, and hence it only works in java 7. You can also have a look at how this new feature is implemented in JDK 7.

0

Java 8 supports string switchcase.

String type = "apple";

switch(type){
    case "apple":
       //statements
    break;
    default:
       //statements
    break; }
1
  • Also Java 7, as was mentioned several times.
    – shmosel
    Apr 13, 2018 at 21:46
0
    String name,lname;
 name= JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null,"Enter your name");
   lname= JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null,"Enter your father name");
    if(name.equals("Ahmad")){
       JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null,"welcome "+name);
    }
    if(lname.equals("Khan"))
   JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null,"Name : "+name +"\nLast name :"+lname ); 

    else {
       JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null,"try again " );
    } 
  }}
-1

Not very pretty but here is another way:

String runFct = 
        queryType.equals("eq") ? "method1":
        queryType.equals("L_L")? "method2":
        queryType.equals("L_R")? "method3":
        queryType.equals("L_LR")? "method4":
            "method5";
Method m = this.getClass().getMethod(runFct);
m.invoke(this);
-11
String value = someMethod();
switch(0) {
default:
    if ("apple".equals(value)) {
        method1();
        break;
    }
    if ("carrot".equals(value)) {
        method2();
        break;
    }
    if ("mango".equals(value)) {
        method3();
        break;
    }
    if ("orance".equals(value)) {
        method4();
        break;
    }
}
3
  • 2
    Outch. A needless switch statement only to have it.
    – glglgl
    Jul 28, 2016 at 12:36
  • Please, remove your answer. Sep 3, 2020 at 6:31
  • 1
    LoL, I really liked the creativity though
    – testing_22
    Apr 10, 2022 at 23:27

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