10

Update - I've decided against the JavaScript solution. The only way to make sure it always works is to put it in setInterval() going every few seconds. Don't want to do that. I know this CSS is possible, I've seen it work. I'll re-open the bounty for more like 150 if it ends.


I have a modal popup made up of two sections: left and right. Within both sections are a label above and the content below. The label is fixed at a certain number of pixels, but the bottom area needs to be able to fill the remaining space, so I'm using display:table on the left and right sides and display: table-cell on the inner sections to achieve the "fill remaining space" effect. It works great in Chrome and Safari.

Here's the CSS:

#tagBoxLeft,#tagBoxRight {
    display: table;
    height: 100%;
    width: 50%;
    position: absolute;
    right: 0;
    opacity: 0;
}
#tagBoxLeft { left: 0 }
#tagBoxDescription {
    display: table-row;
    -webkit-border-top-left-radius: 20px;
    width: 100%;
    word-break: break-all;
    word-wrap: break-word;
    -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 0 #FFF;
    -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 0 #FFF;
    box-shadow: 0 1px 0 #FFF;
}
.nano {
    position: relative;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    overflow: hidden;
    display: table-cell;
}
#taglabel {
    display: table-row;
    z-index: 10000;
    border-top: 1px solid #FFF;
    width: 100%;
    height: 39px;
}

And it just makes a bunch of divs into a table so they can have heights that are relative to each other. Also notice that the left and right sides are relative to the browser window, so that's why I can't just use percentages.

However, in Firefox and Opera, the #tagBoxLeft and #tagBoxRight sides sections refuse to accept height:100%; while they have display:table;. So it won't force the bottom sections up responsively.I know Firefox & Opera support this normally (see http://jsfiddle.net/Qxswa/). But why does all my content overflow in Firefox and Opera?

Here's a screenshot of the issue:

enter image description here

  • #tagBox has a height of 75%? so in my firefox and your screenshot the height of the table is 100% relative to this tagBox because it's position is not static, it's fixed. Actually I'm seeing a lot more problems happening on the page, major simplification of html/css will help. – Timo Huovinen May 1 '12 at 9:33
  • provided that your jsfiddle shows me your current html/css, I would like to see an image of the jsfiddle where it looks the way that you want it to look, then I can help. – Timo Huovinen May 1 '12 at 9:39
2
+50

Here's an alternative to using display:table and friends, which uses the oft-neglected ability of absolutely positioned elements to have both their top and bottom (and left and right) values set. It essentially 'sticks' the top and bottom edge, giving you a height relative to a container, but without explicitly setting a height.

UDPATED: As Jackson mentioned, the CSS-only version of this code doesn't provide an auto-height, fixed panel in the column. A simple bit of JS will fix that - you'd just need to set a sensible default height for users without JS. The JS only needs to run when you load the modal, not at intervals.

Here's the updated fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/cxY7D/5

and here's the simplified HTML:

<div id="modal">
      <div class="left">
          <div class="description">
            <h1>#tag_name</h1>
            <dl>
             <dt>Tags</dt> <dd>27</dd>
            </dl>
          </div>
          <div class="contents">
            <div class="header">            
              <h2>Featured</h2>
            </div>
            <ol>
              <li>Something Something</li>
              <li>...</li>
            </ol>
          </div>
      </div>
      <div class="right">
        <div class="contents">
          <div class="header">
            <h2>Recent</h2>
          </div>
          <ol>
            <li>Something Something</li>
            <li>...</li>
          </ol>
        </div>
      </div>
  </div>

and CSS:

body {
      background:#444;
    }
     #modal {
       background:#FFF;
       position: absolute;
       top: 4em;
       bottom: 4em;
       left: 6em;
       right: 6em;
     }

     #modal .left,
     #modal .right {
       position:absolute;
       top: 0;
       bottom: 0;
     }

     #modal .left {
       background:#ACF9E4;
       left: 0;
       right:50%;
     }

     #modal .right {
       background:#FCFFCD;
       right: 0;
       left:50%;
     }

     #modal .contents {
      position:absolute;
      top: 0;
      bottom: 0;
      width: 100%;
      overflow-y:auto;
     }

     #modal .description {
       height: 8em;
     }

     #modal .description + .contents {
       top: 10em;
   }

     #modal .header,
     #modal .description,
     .contents li {
       border-bottom:1px solid #CCC;
       padding: 1em;
     }

     #modal .description dt {
       float: left;
       padding-right: 1em;
     }

It's a really useful and robust technique. A lot of people get the shudders when you mention 'absolute positions', but used like this, it's really liberating!

The JS (assuming jQuery)

$(function(){
    $('#modal').on('display', function(){
        //Calculate the height of the top left panel, and provide the remaining space to the bottom left
        var leftColumn = $(this).find('.left'),
            descriptionHeight = leftColumn.find('.description').height('auto').outerHeight(); //Set the height to auto, then read it

        leftColumn.find('.contents').css('top', descriptionHeight)//Apply the height to the scrolling contents pane     
    });

    $('#modal').trigger('display');
});​

The JS resets the top-left pane to auto-height, then reads the height and applies it as the top co-ordinate of the bottom-left panel. It's applied as a custom event, so you can trigger it as part of your modal display code.

Here's an answer I gave, using a similar technique, and more explanations of the hows and whys: The Impossible Layout?. Check the A list apart article for more discussion, and some simple fixes that make it work in IE6 (if you care about that).

| improve this answer | |
  • Dude you did it! Great work. Well deserving of more then these mere 50 reps. – alt May 1 '12 at 23:43
  • You didn't do it dude. Went to apply this awesome code and realized the height of the "description" area (top left box) is fixed, so is the bottom left box. The top left box needs to have height:auto; and the bottom left box should fit right into it, filling the available space. – alt May 5 '12 at 6:44
  • Ah, you're right - that's a concession I had to make. The calculation to produce one auto-height sibling, then one overflow sibling is not something I can see a way to do. Display: table-cell and friends might get you close, but they introduce a whole different set of complications. – Ben Hull May 7 '12 at 3:42
  • I've updated the answer with the missing piece of JS to make it all work nice. – Ben Hull May 7 '12 at 4:05
  • Thanks. It would be nice to have CSS but it looks like nobody can find the issue. I've dissected this thing for days, honestly. – alt May 7 '12 at 7:22
4

Is there a reason why you can't simply use JavaScript to calculate the correct height and apply it inline? It's not as nice and simple, but it would be trivial for what you are describing.

var boxHeight = $('#tagBox').height();
var leftLabelHeight = $('#tagBoxDescription').height();
$('#tagBoxPopular').css('height', boxHeight - leftLabelHeight + 'px');

var rightLabelHeight = $('#taglabel').height();
$('#tagBoxStream').css('height', boxHeight - rightLabelHeight + 'px');
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    It would have to change on resize, making performance very poor. I'd like to do it in CSS, as it appears to be possible through display:table; I was using JS previously, but I'm a CSS nut and very intrigued by this issue. – alt Apr 25 '12 at 22:17
2

I open your site on firefox and the hashtag links i see with chrome are gone. Are you doing some fix-attempts right now? If you put the links back in for the ff version I can help you debug this.

UPDATE:

What I see is a highly overcomplicated mix of display:table's and display:table-cells's with absolute and static positionings combined with percentual heights and many other highly cross-browser volatile mixes.

Doing lots of patching and fixing I was able to get this:

screenshot of patched up version under firefox

There's obviously many errors still present but at least you get some scrollbars.

Basically, the problem is that you're relying upon percentual heights and shady table-displays that are seemingly not very evenly rendered by different browsers.

We have two options here:

1.- Keep your original css/html approach and troubleshoot the JS scrollbar.
2.- Go for a much much much simpler css/html variant

Cheers G

| improve this answer | |
  • I'm getting a js error: permission denied to access property parentNode on /js/hashtraffic-desktop.js line 281 – Capagris Apr 25 '12 at 23:08
  • I'll look into it tomorrow. Thanks for your help! – alt Apr 26 '12 at 7:38
  • That issue has been fixed. Thanks for finding the console error! My Firefox must have a bug (new in version 12?) because that error was only flashing up on the screen momentarily, I dismissed it every time since it went away. – alt Apr 27 '12 at 0:39
  • its on my developer webtools add-on, not ff itself – Capagris Apr 27 '12 at 12:39
  • question, how are you calling the jquery-based scrollbar? – Capagris Apr 27 '12 at 12:55
0

You may want to look at how you're using <section>. It is not the same as a <div>.

W3C - Using HTML5 section elements , and header elements.

<header> appears the same. They're both flow elements, and not designed as content containers, but as semantic structuring elements for content containers.

I used Firebug and changed both <header> and <section> to display:block on a hunch. Things started to shape up; however I could not get the scroll effect to fire after those changes. I then changed <header> in safari to display:inline. Sure enough - both my browser windows looked like this: enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks, but this is a very preliminary version of my software and I'm focused way more on this bug then the layout of the site. Do you have an answer that pertains to my question? – alt Apr 25 '12 at 19:46
  • I was eluding to the answer. My FireFox wouldn't even display the page, or the functionality (scrolls, etc) with those elements acting in their default behaviors. You've got to level the playing field of the browsers so you have realistic expectations between the top 3 or 4 you're targeting. – Dawson Apr 28 '12 at 23:54
0

You need to have the #tagboxleft and #tagboxright's overflow hidden. This can be done by setting #tagbox to overflow:hidden, however that will hide part of the close button. so you need another div wrapped around the left and right but not the x with overflow:hidden.

Like so:

<div id="tagbox">
    <div id="tagboxX"></div>
    <div id="tagboxleftright" style="overflow:hidden"> <!-- This is the wrapper div around tagbox left & right. Of course, move overflow:hidden to the style sheet -->
        <div id="tagboxLeft"></div>
        <div id="tagboxRight"></div>
    </div>
</div>

This worked in Firefox and it should work in Internet Explorer.

| improve this answer | |
  • But then you can't scroll the second div area. :/ Think you could troubleshoot? – alt Apr 25 '12 at 19:45
  • 1
    Sure, I'll try and figure it out – Ian Apr 25 '12 at 20:06
  • Thanks mate this is killin' me. – alt Apr 25 '12 at 20:11
  • I think that @MatthewDarnel's code is the way to go. I tested it with Firefox's scratchpad and it worked wonderfully. I think that with that you will be able to remove most of the display stylings as well. By the way, that's a really neat idea you have. – Ian Apr 25 '12 at 22:40
  • 1
    Stack Overflow is being weird and won't let me comment on the answer from @sotkra above, but my opinion is that the JavaScript from @MatthewDarnel works and looks better for a couple reasons. First: the scrollbars don't go all the way to the top (below the shadow) and they go past the bottom in that one. Second: the X is clipped (could be fixed easily, but that's more markup). Third: with the JavaScript, you can probably remove most of the display:table* stuff. – Ian Apr 27 '12 at 15:36

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