244

For ages now I've used SHIFTO and SHIFT$ to move to the beginning and end of a line in vi.

However SHIFTO is more for opening a new line above the cursor.

Is there any command which just takes you to the start of a line?

2
  • 9
    In addition to the answers below, type :help left-right-motions in Vim for plenty of info. – ngm Apr 20 '12 at 9:37
  • a good book for vim: practice in vim. ^ 0 – 陈思秀 May 23 '18 at 13:00

10 Answers 10

451

You can use ^ or 0 (Zero) in normal mode to move to the beginning of a line.

^ moves the cursor to the first non-blank character of a line
0 always moves the cursor to the "first column"

You can also use Shifti to move and switch to Insert mode.

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  • 5
    Also Shift+A and Shift+I goes to end and beginning of line respectively and also switches to Insert Model – bibstha Oct 30 '14 at 12:42
  • 8
    For me, pressing ^ is usually not as easy as pressing 0 and w consecutively. – DXDXY Feb 11 '16 at 0:51
34

A simple 0 takes you to the beginning of a line.

:help 0 for more information

27

Try this Vi/Vim cheatsheet solution to many problems.

For normal mode :
0 - [zero] to beginning of line, first column.
$ - to end of line

13

You can use 0 or ^ to move to beginning of the line.
And can use Shift+I to move to the beginning and switch to editing mode (Insert).

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  • 1
    You answer is mostly correct but there's a small caveat. Shift+I or ^ will move cursor to beginning of the text in the line. If line has n tabs in the beginning, it'll move cursor to n*tabstop + 1th column. While 0 moves cursor to the very first column of the line. – narendra-choudhary Jun 23 '16 at 16:52
11

There is another way:

|

That is the "pipe" - the symbol found under the backspace in ANSI layout.

Vim quickref (:help quickref) describes it as:

N      |      to column N (default: 1)

What about wrapped lines?

If you have wrap lines enabled, 0 and | will no longer take you to the beginning of the screen line. In that case use:

g0

Again, vim quickref doc:

 g0   to first character in screen line (differs from "0"
      when lines wrap)
1
  • Now I see why it works. Thanks. I was wondering. I think it is better than 0 because | and $ are on the same key. – WesternGun May 3 '18 at 8:32
9

Move the cursor to the begining or end with insert mode

  • I - Moves the cursor to the first non blank character in the current line and enables insert mode.
  • A - Moves the cursor to the last character in the current line and enables insert mode.

Here I is equivalent to ^ + i. Similarly A is equivalent to $ + a.

Just moving the cursor to the begining or end

  • ^ - Moves the cursor to the first non blank character in the current line
  • 0 - Moves the cursor to the first character in the current line
  • $ - Moves the cursor to the last character in the current line
7

Type "^". And get a good "Vi" tutorial :)

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  • It doesn't work in my vim if the line is indented. And shift+0 mentioned above works fine. – saulius2 Oct 9 '20 at 13:16
5

I just found 0(zero) and shift+0 works on vim.

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  • 5
    shift+0 that's ) , which is next sentence – mihai Apr 20 '12 at 10:48
  • Shift+0 is better, ^ shows the character and that's annoying. Thanks – calbertts Jun 2 '17 at 12:12
1

0 Takes you to the beginning of the line

Shift 0 Takes you to the end of the line

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  • Shift-0 (')') doesn't take you to the beginning of the line – Boris Churzin Oct 26 '17 at 12:16
  • 1
    Shift-0 (")") is "sentence forward" not "end of the line" (that's what I meant) – Boris Churzin Oct 30 '17 at 8:26
1

You can also use

:-0

This sets the cursor at the present line (blank here) at the 0 column.

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