41

It's easy enough to make a simple sieve:

for (int i=2; i<=N; i++){
    if (sieve[i]==0){
        cout << i << " is prime" << endl;
        for (int j = i; j<=N; j+=i){
            sieve[j]=1;
        }
    }
    cout << i << " has " << sieve[i] << " distinct prime factors\n";
}

But what about when N is very large and I can't hold that kind of array in memory? I've looked up segmented sieve approaches and they seem to involve finding primes up until sqrt(N) but I don't understand how it works. What if N is very large (say 10^18)?

2
  • You mentioned in your answer to larsmans that you are really interested in finding the number of prime factors for large N. In that case, and assuming N < 10^18, you're much better off to factor N than to sieve all the numbers up to N.
    – user448810
    Apr 20 '12 at 16:20
  • 2
    For each k up to N, not just N
    – John Smith
    Apr 20 '12 at 16:24
56

The basic idea of a segmented sieve is to choose the sieving primes less than the square root of n, choose a reasonably large segment size that nevertheless fits in memory, and then sieve each of the segments in turn, starting with the smallest. At the first segment, the smallest multiple of each sieving prime that is within the segment is calculated, then multiples of the sieving prime are marked as composite in the normal way; when all the sieving primes have been used, the remaining unmarked numbers in the segment are prime. Then, for the next segment, for each sieving prime you already know the first multiple in the current segment (it was the multiple that ended the sieving for that prime in the prior segment), so you sieve on each sieving prime, and so on until you are finished.

The size of n doesn't matter, except that a larger n will take longer to sieve than a smaller n; the size that matters is the size of the segment, which should be as large as convenient (say, the size of the primary memory cache on the machine).

You can see a simple implementation of a segmented sieve here. Note that a segmented sieve will be very much faster than O'Neill's priority-queue sieve mentioned in another answer; if you're interested, there's an implementation here.

EDIT: I wrote this for a different purpose, but I'll show it here because it might be useful:

Though the Sieve of Eratosthenes is very fast, it requires O(n) space. That can be reduced to O(sqrt(n)) for the sieving primes plus O(1) for the bitarray by performing the sieving in successive segments. At the first segment, the smallest multiple of each sieving prime that is within the segment is calculated, then multiples of the sieving prime are marked composite in the normal way; when all the sieving primes have been used, the remaining unmarked numbers in the segment are prime. Then, for the next segment, the smallest multiple of each sieving prime is the multiple that ended the sieving in the prior segment, and so the sieving continues until finished.

Consider the example of sieve from 100 to 200 in segments of 20. The five sieving primes are 3, 5, 7, 11 and 13. In the first segment from 100 to 120, the bitarray has ten slots, with slot 0 corresponding to 101, slot k corresponding to 100+2k+1, and slot 9 corresponding to 119. The smallest multiple of 3 in the segment is 105, corresponding to slot 2; slots 2+3=5 and 5+3=8 are also multiples of 3. The smallest multiple of 5 is 105 at slot 2, and slot 2+5=7 is also a multiple of 5. The smallest multiple of 7 is 105 at slot 2, and slot 2+7=9 is also a multiple of 7. And so on.

Function primesRange takes arguments lo, hi and delta; lo and hi must be even, with lo < hi, and lo must be greater than sqrt(hi). The segment size is twice delta. Ps is a linked list containing the sieving primes less than sqrt(hi), with 2 removed since even numbers are ignored. Qs is a linked list containing the offest into the sieve bitarray of the smallest multiple in the current segment of the corresponding sieving prime. After each segment, lo advances by twice delta, so the number corresponding to an index i of the sieve bitarray is lo + 2i + 1.

function primesRange(lo, hi, delta)
    function qInit(p)
        return (-1/2 * (lo + p + 1)) % p
    function qReset(p, q)
        return (q - delta) % p
    sieve := makeArray(0..delta-1)
    ps := tail(primes(sqrt(hi)))
    qs := map(qInit, ps)
    while lo < hi
        for i from 0 to delta-1
            sieve[i] := True
        for p,q in ps,qs
            for i from q to delta step p
                sieve[i] := False
        qs := map(qReset, ps, qs)
        for i,t from 0,lo+1 to delta-1,hi step 1,2
            if sieve[i]
                output t
        lo := lo + 2 * delta

When called as primesRange(100, 200, 10), the sieving primes ps are [3, 5, 7, 11, 13]; qs is initially [2, 2, 2, 10, 8] corresponding to smallest multiples 105, 105, 105, 121 and 117, and is reset for the second segment to [1, 2, 6, 0, 11] corresponding to smallest multiples 123, 125, 133, 121 and 143.

You can see this program in action at http://ideone.com/iHYr1f. And in addition to the links shown above, if you are interested in programming with prime numbers I modestly recommend this essay at my blog.

38
  • 1
    Did you look? The implementation I pointed to includes a pretty good explanation.
    – user448810
    Apr 20 '12 at 16:32
  • 3
    You asked for examples. The referenced site shows precisely how to sieve the range 100 to 200 in five segments, including how to choose the sieving primes and how to reset the sieving primes for each segment. Did you work out the example for yourself, by hand? What is it that you still don't understand?
    – user448810
    Apr 20 '12 at 16:40
  • 6
    Looking at the example. The sieving primes less than the square root of 200 are 3, 5, 7, 11 and 13. Let's consider the first segment, which has the ten values {101 103 105 107 109 111 113 115 117 119}. The smallest multiple of 3 in the segment is 105, so strike 105 and each third number after: 111, 117. The smallest multiple of 5 in the segment is 105, so strike 105 and the fifth number after: 115. The smallest multiple of 7 in the segment is 105, so strike 105 and the seventh number after: 119. There is no multiple of 11 in the segment, so there is nothing to do. The smallest multiple of 13
    – user448810
    Apr 20 '12 at 16:58
  • 5
    in the segment is 117, so strike it. The numbers that are left {101 103 107 109 113} are prime. For the second segment {121 123 125 127 129 131 133 135 137 139} the smallest multiples of each prime are 123, 125, 133 (beyond the segment), 121 and 143 (beyond the segment), which can all be calculated by counting the next multiple of the sieving prime after the end of the first segment. Does that help?
    – user448810
    Apr 20 '12 at 17:02
  • 4
    +1 for an excellent description of segmented sieves and the programmingpraxis link.
    – NealB
    Apr 20 '12 at 17:20
5

There's a version of the Sieve based on priority queues that yields as many primes as you request, rather than all of them up to an upper bound. It's discussed in the classic paper "The Genuine Sieve of Eratosthenes" and googling for "sieve of eratosthenes priority queue" turns up quite a few implementations in various programming languages.

14
  • 1
    I've come across the implementations but the problem is that I don't understand them. Those papers are always quite dense. I'm mainly looking for examples because I think those are easiest to work with and understand. Technically I am using the sieve to acquire # of unique prime factors per value k for large N.
    – John Smith
    Apr 20 '12 at 16:10
  • 1
    An incremental sieve as used by Melissa O'Neill in the linked paper is quite slow as compared to an array-based sieve, and worse, has asymptotic computational complexity that grows by considerable faster than linearly with range, so may not be suitable for this problem. As to the "no upper bound necessary" qualification, a page segmented sieve also doesn't have to have a specified upper bound if the base primes less than the square root of the current range) are implemented as a "expandable array" or as a form of list. Apr 17 '14 at 4:17
  • @gordonbgood it is not obviously correct to me that the iterators-and-priority-queue-based sieve "is quite slow as compared to an array-based sieve". The runtime is, near as I can tell: O(the sum from i=2 to n of log(π(i)-1) ω(i)) (where π is number of primes less than or equal to a given number, and ω is the number of unique prime factors of a given number). A comparably naive implementation of an array-based sieve is O(the sum from i=2 to n of (n/i if i is prime, or 1 if i is not prime)).
    – mtraceur
    Mar 1 at 14:20
  • @gordonbgood Basically, I don't have the math chops to quickly think it through, but currently I do think that you're right that the former is slower than the latter, and that the former has worse asymptomatic growth than the latter. But that's not a very trivial analysis, my initial intuition was to doubt your comment. I had to make the complexity of each iteration explicit like this for me to see that you seem to be generally right (subjective fuzzy strengthening words like "quite" aside).
    – mtraceur
    Mar 1 at 14:21
  • @gordonbgood But upon further analysis it gets even less clear. Let's look at those terms in the sum: n/i in array-based vs log(π(i)-1) ω(i). The former trends from n divided by a small constant, towards one. The latter trends from one, towards log(π(n)-1) ω(n). That tempts the intuition into "the former shrinks, the latter grows, so clearly the former is faster and the latter is slower". But I found it useful to notice that if we take all the terms of those sums for a given n, and sort them from smallest to largest, both start at 1 and climb to n/2 and log(π(n)-1) ω(n), respectively.
    – mtraceur
    Mar 1 at 15:26
5

It's just that we are making segmented with the sieve we have. The basic idea is let's say we have to find out prime numbers between 85 and 100. We have to apply the traditional sieve,but in the fashion as described below:

So we take the first prime number 2 , divide the starting number by 2(85/2) and taking round off to smaller number we get p=42,now multiply again by 2 we get p=84, from here onwards start adding 2 till the last number.So what we have done is that we have removed all the factors of 2(86,88,90,92,94,96,98,100) in the range.

We take the next prime number 3 , divide the starting number by 3(85/3) and taking round off to smaller number we get p=28,now multiply again by 3 we get p=84, from here onwards start adding 3 till the last number.So what we have done is that we have removed all the factors of 3(87,90,93,96,99) in the range.

Take the next prime number=5 and so on.................. Keep on doing the above steps.You can get the prime numbers (2,3,5,7,...) by using the traditional sieve upto sqrt(n).And then use it for segmented sieve.

2

If someone would like to see C++ implementation, here is mine:

void sito_delta( int delta, std::vector<int> &res)
{

std::unique_ptr<int[]> results(new int[delta+1]);
for(int i = 0; i <= delta; ++i)
    results[i] = 1;

int pierw = sqrt(delta);
for (int j = 2; j <= pierw; ++j)
{
    if(results[j])
    {
        for (int k = 2*j; k <= delta; k+=j)
        {
            results[k]=0;
        }
    }
}

for (int m = 2; m <= delta; ++m)
    if (results[m])
    {
        res.push_back(m);
        std::cout<<","<<m;
    }
};
void sito_segment(int n,std::vector<int> &fiPri)
{
int delta = sqrt(n);

if (delta>10)
{
    sito_segment(delta,fiPri);
   // COmpute using fiPri as primes
   // n=n,prime = fiPri;
      std::vector<int> prime=fiPri;
      int offset = delta;
      int low = offset;
      int high = offset * 2;
      while (low < n)
      {
          if (high >=n ) high = n;
          int mark[offset+1];
          for (int s=0;s<=offset;++s)
              mark[s]=1;

          for(int j = 0; j< prime.size(); ++j)
          {
            int lowMinimum = (low/prime[j]) * prime[j];
            if(lowMinimum < low)
                lowMinimum += prime[j];

            for(int k = lowMinimum; k<=high;k+=prime[j])
                mark[k-low]=0;
          }

          for(int i = low; i <= high; i++)
              if(mark[i-low])
              {
                fiPri.push_back(i);
                std::cout<<","<<i;
              }
          low=low+offset;
          high=high+offset;
      }
}
else
{

std::vector<int> prime;
sito_delta(delta, prime);
//
fiPri = prime;
//
int offset = delta;
int low = offset;
int high = offset * 2;
// Process segments one by one 
while (low < n)
{
    if (high >= n) high = n;
    int  mark[offset+1];
    for (int s = 0; s <= offset; ++s)
        mark[s] = 1;

    for (int j = 0; j < prime.size(); ++j)
    {
        // find the minimum number in [low..high] that is
        // multiple of prime[i] (divisible by prime[j])
        int lowMinimum = (low/prime[j]) * prime[j];
        if(lowMinimum < low)
            lowMinimum += prime[j];

        //Mark multiples of prime[i] in [low..high]
        for (int k = lowMinimum; k <= high; k+=prime[j])
            mark[k-low] = 0;
    }

    for (int i = low; i <= high; i++)
        if(mark[i-low])
        {
            fiPri.push_back(i);
            std::cout<<","<<i;
        }
    low = low + offset;
    high = high + offset;
}
}
};

int main()
{
std::vector<int> fiPri;
sito_segment(1013,fiPri);
}
1

Based on Swapnil Kumar answer I did the following algorithm in C. It was built with mingw32-make.exe.

#include<math.h>
#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    const int MAX_PRIME_NUMBERS = 5000000;//The number of prime numbers we are looking for
    long long *prime_numbers = malloc(sizeof(long long) * MAX_PRIME_NUMBERS);
    prime_numbers[0] = 2;
    prime_numbers[1] = 3;
    prime_numbers[2] = 5;
    prime_numbers[3] = 7;
    prime_numbers[4] = 11;
    prime_numbers[5] = 13;
    prime_numbers[6] = 17;
    prime_numbers[7] = 19;
    prime_numbers[8] = 23;
    prime_numbers[9] = 29;
    const int BUFFER_POSSIBLE_PRIMES = 29 * 29;//Because the greatest prime number we have is 29 in the 10th position so I started with a block of 841 numbers
    int qt_calculated_primes = 10;//10 because we initialized the array with the ten first primes
    int possible_primes[BUFFER_POSSIBLE_PRIMES];//Will store the booleans to check valid primes
    long long iteration = 0;//Used as multiplier to the range of the buffer possible_primes
    int i;//Simple counter for loops
    while(qt_calculated_primes < MAX_PRIME_NUMBERS)
    {
        for (i = 0; i < BUFFER_POSSIBLE_PRIMES; i++)
            possible_primes[i] = 1;//set the number as prime

        int biggest_possible_prime = sqrt((iteration + 1) * BUFFER_POSSIBLE_PRIMES);

        int k = 0;

        long long prime = prime_numbers[k];//First prime to be used in the check

        while (prime <= biggest_possible_prime)//We don't need to check primes bigger than the square root
        {
            for (i = 0; i < BUFFER_POSSIBLE_PRIMES; i++)
                if ((iteration * BUFFER_POSSIBLE_PRIMES + i) % prime == 0)
                    possible_primes[i] = 0;

            if (++k == qt_calculated_primes)
                break;

            prime = prime_numbers[k];
        }
        for (i = 0; i < BUFFER_POSSIBLE_PRIMES; i++)
            if (possible_primes[i])
            {
                if ((qt_calculated_primes < MAX_PRIME_NUMBERS) && ((iteration * BUFFER_POSSIBLE_PRIMES + i) != 1))
                {
                    prime_numbers[qt_calculated_primes] = iteration * BUFFER_POSSIBLE_PRIMES + i;
                    printf("%d\n", prime_numbers[qt_calculated_primes]);
                    qt_calculated_primes++;
                } else if (!(qt_calculated_primes < MAX_PRIME_NUMBERS))
                    break;
            }

        iteration++;
    }

    return 0;
}

It set a maximum of prime numbers to be found, then an array is initialized with known prime numbers like 2, 3, 5...29. So we make a buffer that will store the segments of possible primes, this buffer can't be greater than the power of the greatest initial prime that in this case is 29.

I'm sure there are a plenty of optimizations that can be done to improve the performance like parallelize the segments analysis process and skip numbers that are multiple of 2, 3 and 5 but it serves as an example of low memory consumption.

0

A number is prime if none of the smaller prime numbers divides it. Since we iterate over the prime numbers in order, we already marked all numbers, who are divisible by at least one of the prime numbers, as divisible. Hence if we reach a cell and it is not marked, then it isn't divisible by any smaller prime number and therefore has to be prime.

Remember these points:-

// Generating all prime number up to  R
 
// creating an array of size (R-L-1) set all elements to be true: prime && false: composite
     

#include<bits/stdc++.h>

using namespace std;

#define MAX 100001

vector<int>* sieve(){
    bool isPrime[MAX];

    for(int i=0;i<MAX;i++){
        isPrime[i]=true;
    }
 for(int i=2;i*i<MAX;i++){
     if(isPrime[i]){
         for(int j=i*i;j<MAX;j+=i){
             isPrime[j]=false;
         }
     }
 }

 vector<int>* primes = new vector<int>();
 primes->push_back(2);
 for(int i=3;i<MAX;i+=2){
     if(isPrime[i]){
     primes->push_back(i);
     }
}

 return primes;
}

void printPrimes(long long l, long long r, vector<int>*&primes){
      bool isprimes[r-l+1];
      for(int i=0;i<=r-l;i++){
          isprimes[i]=true;
      }

      for(int i=0;primes->at(i)*(long long)primes->at(i)<=r;i++){

          int currPrimes=primes->at(i);
          //just smaller or equal value to l
          long long base =(l/(currPrimes))*(currPrimes);
      

          if(base<l){
              base=base+currPrimes;
          }
    
    //mark all multiplies within L to R as false

          for(long long j=base;j<=r;j+=currPrimes){
              isprimes[j-l]=false;
          }

   //there may be a case where base is itself a prime number

          if(base==currPrimes){
              isprimes[base-l]= true;
          }
    }

          for(int i=0;i<=r-l;i++){
              if(isprimes[i]==true){
                  cout<<i+l<<endl;
              }
          

      }
}
int main(){
    vector<int>* primes=sieve();
   
   int t;
   cin>>t;
   while(t--){
       long long l,r;
       cin>>l>>r;
       printPrimes(l,r,primes);
   }

    return 0;

}

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