115

Is there any way to determine a string's encoding in C#?

Say, I have a filename string, but I don't know if it is encoded in Unicode UTF-16 or the system-default encoding, how do I find out?

  • 2
    how can you write such approximations? UTF-16 is one of the possible ways to encode Unicode data. You can't "Unicode-encode"; Unicode is not UTF-; and UTF- is not Unicode. Sorry but if we keep writing such approximations, how Unicode-related behaviors will ever change? Beginners will always get confused by the dark Unicode monster and things will never change. Let's be precise. – Nicolas Dumazet Jun 22 '09 at 5:34
  • 5
    to be clearer maybe: you encode Unicode code-points into byte strings of a character set using an "encoding" scheme (utf-, iso-, big5, shift-jis, etc...), and you decode byte strings from a character set to Unicode. You don't encode bytestrings in Unicode. You don't decode Unicode in bytestrings. – Nicolas Dumazet Jun 22 '09 at 6:18
  • 13
    @NicDunZ - the encoding itself (in particular UTF-16) is also commonly called "Unicode". Right or wrong, that is life. Even in .NET, look at Encoding.Unicode - meaning UTF-16. – Marc Gravell Jun 22 '09 at 7:24
  • 2
    oh well, I did not know that .NET was so misleading. That looks like a terrible habit to learn. And sorry @krebstar, that wasn't my intention (I still think that your edited question makes much much more sense now than before) – Nicolas Dumazet Jun 22 '09 at 8:42
  • 1
    @Nicdumz #1: There is a way to probabilistically determine which encoding to use. Look at what does IE (and now also FF with View - Character Encoding - Auto-detect) for that: it tries one encoding and see if it is possibly "well written <put a language name here>" or change it and tries again. Come on, this can be fun! – SnippyHolloW Jun 22 '09 at 14:43
30

Check out Utf8Checker it is simple class that does exactly this in pure managed code. http://utf8checker.codeplex.com

Notice: as already pointed out "determine encoding" makes sense only for byte streams. If you have a string it is already encoded from someone along the way who already knew or guessed the encoding to get the string in the first place.

  • If the string is an incorrect decoding done with a simply 8-bit Encoding and you have the Encoding used to decode it, you can usually get the bytes back without any corruption, though. – Nyerguds Jan 27 '18 at 13:44
47

The code below has the following features:

  1. Detection or attempted detection of UTF-7, UTF-8/16/32 (bom, no bom, little & big endian)
  2. Falls back to the local default codepage if no Unicode encoding was found.
  3. Detects (with high probability) unicode files with the BOM/signature missing
  4. Searches for charset=xyz and encoding=xyz inside file to help determine encoding.
  5. To save processing, you can 'taste' the file (definable number of bytes).
  6. The encoding and decoded text file is returned.
  7. Purely byte-based solution for efficiency

As others have said, no solution can be perfect (and certainly one can't easily differentiate between the various 8-bit extended ASCII encodings in use worldwide), but we can get 'good enough' especially if the developer also presents to the user a list of alternative encodings as shown here: What is the most common encoding of each language?

A full list of Encodings can be found using Encoding.GetEncodings();

// Function to detect the encoding for UTF-7, UTF-8/16/32 (bom, no bom, little
// & big endian), and local default codepage, and potentially other codepages.
// 'taster' = number of bytes to check of the file (to save processing). Higher
// value is slower, but more reliable (especially UTF-8 with special characters
// later on may appear to be ASCII initially). If taster = 0, then taster
// becomes the length of the file (for maximum reliability). 'text' is simply
// the string with the discovered encoding applied to the file.
public Encoding detectTextEncoding(string filename, out String text, int taster = 1000)
{
    byte[] b = File.ReadAllBytes(filename);

    //////////////// First check the low hanging fruit by checking if a
    //////////////// BOM/signature exists (sourced from http://www.unicode.org/faq/utf_bom.html#bom4)
    if (b.Length >= 4 && b[0] == 0x00 && b[1] == 0x00 && b[2] == 0xFE && b[3] == 0xFF) { text = Encoding.GetEncoding("utf-32BE").GetString(b, 4, b.Length - 4); return Encoding.GetEncoding("utf-32BE"); }  // UTF-32, big-endian 
    else if (b.Length >= 4 && b[0] == 0xFF && b[1] == 0xFE && b[2] == 0x00 && b[3] == 0x00) { text = Encoding.UTF32.GetString(b, 4, b.Length - 4); return Encoding.UTF32; }    // UTF-32, little-endian
    else if (b.Length >= 2 && b[0] == 0xFE && b[1] == 0xFF) { text = Encoding.BigEndianUnicode.GetString(b, 2, b.Length - 2); return Encoding.BigEndianUnicode; }     // UTF-16, big-endian
    else if (b.Length >= 2 && b[0] == 0xFF && b[1] == 0xFE) { text = Encoding.Unicode.GetString(b, 2, b.Length - 2); return Encoding.Unicode; }              // UTF-16, little-endian
    else if (b.Length >= 3 && b[0] == 0xEF && b[1] == 0xBB && b[2] == 0xBF) { text = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(b, 3, b.Length - 3); return Encoding.UTF8; } // UTF-8
    else if (b.Length >= 3 && b[0] == 0x2b && b[1] == 0x2f && b[2] == 0x76) { text = Encoding.UTF7.GetString(b,3,b.Length-3); return Encoding.UTF7; } // UTF-7


    //////////// If the code reaches here, no BOM/signature was found, so now
    //////////// we need to 'taste' the file to see if can manually discover
    //////////// the encoding. A high taster value is desired for UTF-8
    if (taster == 0 || taster > b.Length) taster = b.Length;    // Taster size can't be bigger than the filesize obviously.


    // Some text files are encoded in UTF8, but have no BOM/signature. Hence
    // the below manually checks for a UTF8 pattern. This code is based off
    // the top answer at: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/6555015/check-for-invalid-utf8
    // For our purposes, an unnecessarily strict (and terser/slower)
    // implementation is shown at: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/1031645/how-to-detect-utf-8-in-plain-c
    // For the below, false positives should be exceedingly rare (and would
    // be either slightly malformed UTF-8 (which would suit our purposes
    // anyway) or 8-bit extended ASCII/UTF-16/32 at a vanishingly long shot).
    int i = 0;
    bool utf8 = false;
    while (i < taster - 4)
    {
        if (b[i] <= 0x7F) { i += 1; continue; }     // If all characters are below 0x80, then it is valid UTF8, but UTF8 is not 'required' (and therefore the text is more desirable to be treated as the default codepage of the computer). Hence, there's no "utf8 = true;" code unlike the next three checks.
        if (b[i] >= 0xC2 && b[i] <= 0xDF && b[i + 1] >= 0x80 && b[i + 1] < 0xC0) { i += 2; utf8 = true; continue; }
        if (b[i] >= 0xE0 && b[i] <= 0xF0 && b[i + 1] >= 0x80 && b[i + 1] < 0xC0 && b[i + 2] >= 0x80 && b[i + 2] < 0xC0) { i += 3; utf8 = true; continue; }
        if (b[i] >= 0xF0 && b[i] <= 0xF4 && b[i + 1] >= 0x80 && b[i + 1] < 0xC0 && b[i + 2] >= 0x80 && b[i + 2] < 0xC0 && b[i + 3] >= 0x80 && b[i + 3] < 0xC0) { i += 4; utf8 = true; continue; }
        utf8 = false; break;
    }
    if (utf8 == true) {
        text = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(b);
        return Encoding.UTF8;
    }


    // The next check is a heuristic attempt to detect UTF-16 without a BOM.
    // We simply look for zeroes in odd or even byte places, and if a certain
    // threshold is reached, the code is 'probably' UF-16.          
    double threshold = 0.1; // proportion of chars step 2 which must be zeroed to be diagnosed as utf-16. 0.1 = 10%
    int count = 0;
    for (int n = 0; n < taster; n += 2) if (b[n] == 0) count++;
    if (((double)count) / taster > threshold) { text = Encoding.BigEndianUnicode.GetString(b); return Encoding.BigEndianUnicode; }
    count = 0;
    for (int n = 1; n < taster; n += 2) if (b[n] == 0) count++;
    if (((double)count) / taster > threshold) { text = Encoding.Unicode.GetString(b); return Encoding.Unicode; } // (little-endian)


    // Finally, a long shot - let's see if we can find "charset=xyz" or
    // "encoding=xyz" to identify the encoding:
    for (int n = 0; n < taster-9; n++)
    {
        if (
            ((b[n + 0] == 'c' || b[n + 0] == 'C') && (b[n + 1] == 'h' || b[n + 1] == 'H') && (b[n + 2] == 'a' || b[n + 2] == 'A') && (b[n + 3] == 'r' || b[n + 3] == 'R') && (b[n + 4] == 's' || b[n + 4] == 'S') && (b[n + 5] == 'e' || b[n + 5] == 'E') && (b[n + 6] == 't' || b[n + 6] == 'T') && (b[n + 7] == '=')) ||
            ((b[n + 0] == 'e' || b[n + 0] == 'E') && (b[n + 1] == 'n' || b[n + 1] == 'N') && (b[n + 2] == 'c' || b[n + 2] == 'C') && (b[n + 3] == 'o' || b[n + 3] == 'O') && (b[n + 4] == 'd' || b[n + 4] == 'D') && (b[n + 5] == 'i' || b[n + 5] == 'I') && (b[n + 6] == 'n' || b[n + 6] == 'N') && (b[n + 7] == 'g' || b[n + 7] == 'G') && (b[n + 8] == '='))
            )
        {
            if (b[n + 0] == 'c' || b[n + 0] == 'C') n += 8; else n += 9;
            if (b[n] == '"' || b[n] == '\'') n++;
            int oldn = n;
            while (n < taster && (b[n] == '_' || b[n] == '-' || (b[n] >= '0' && b[n] <= '9') || (b[n] >= 'a' && b[n] <= 'z') || (b[n] >= 'A' && b[n] <= 'Z')))
            { n++; }
            byte[] nb = new byte[n-oldn];
            Array.Copy(b, oldn, nb, 0, n-oldn);
            try {
                string internalEnc = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(nb);
                text = Encoding.GetEncoding(internalEnc).GetString(b);
                return Encoding.GetEncoding(internalEnc);
            }
            catch { break; }    // If C# doesn't recognize the name of the encoding, break.
        }
    }


    // If all else fails, the encoding is probably (though certainly not
    // definitely) the user's local codepage! One might present to the user a
    // list of alternative encodings as shown here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/8509339/what-is-the-most-common-encoding-of-each-language
    // A full list can be found using Encoding.GetEncodings();
    text = Encoding.Default.GetString(b);
    return Encoding.Default;
}
  • This works for Cyrillic (and probably all other) .eml files (from mail's charset header) – Nime Cloud Dec 8 '13 at 21:00
  • UTF-7 can't be decoded that naively, actually; its full preamble is longer, and includes two bits of the first character. The .Net system seems to have no support at all for UTF7's preamble system. – Nyerguds Mar 17 '16 at 8:43
  • Worked for me when none of other methods I checked didn't help! Thanks Dan. – Tejasvi Hegde Apr 10 '16 at 16:41
  • Thanks for your solution. I'm using it to determine the encoding on files from completely different sources. What I found though, is that if I use too low of a taster value, the result might be wrong. (e.g. the code was returning Encoding.Default for a UTF8 file, even though I was using b.Length / 10 as my taster.) So I got to wondering, what's the argument for using a taster that's less than b.Length? It seems that I can only conclude that Encoding.Default is acceptable if and only if I've scanned the whole file. – Sean Dec 30 '16 at 1:45
  • @Sean: It's for when speed matters more than accuracy, especially for files which may be dozens or hundreds of megabytes in size. In my experience, even a low taster value can yield correct results ~99.9% of the time. Your experience may differ. – Dan W Jul 21 '17 at 17:56
30

It depends where the string 'came from'. A .NET string is Unicode (UTF-16). The only way it could be different if you, say, read the data from a database into a byte array.

This CodeProject article might be of interest: Detect Encoding for in- and outgoing text

Jon Skeet's Strings in C# and .NET is an excellent explanation of .NET strings.

  • It came from a non-Unicode C++ app.. The CodeProject article seems a bit too complex, however it seems to do what I want to do.. Thanks.. – krebstar Jun 22 '09 at 3:47
18

I know this is a bit late - but to be clear:

A string doesn't really have encoding... in .NET the a string is a collection of char objects. Essentially, if it is a string, it has already been decoded.

However if you are reading the contents of a file, which is made of bytes, and wish to convert that to a string, then the file's encoding must be used.

.NET includes encoding and decoding classes for: ASCII, UTF7, UTF8, UTF32 and more.

Most of these encodings contain certain byte-order marks that can be used to distinguish which encoding type was used.

The .NET class System.IO.StreamReader is able to determine the encoding used within a stream, by reading those byte-order marks;

Here is an example:

    /// <summary>
    /// return the detected encoding and the contents of the file.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="fileName"></param>
    /// <param name="contents"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static Encoding DetectEncoding(String fileName, out String contents)
    {
        // open the file with the stream-reader:
        using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(fileName, true))
        {
            // read the contents of the file into a string
            contents = reader.ReadToEnd();

            // return the encoding.
            return reader.CurrentEncoding;
        }
    }
  • 3
    This won't work for detecting UTF 16 without the BOM. Nor will it fall back to the user's local default codepage if it fails to detect any unicode encoding. You can fix the latter by adding Encoding.Default as a StreamReader parameter, but then the code won't detect UTF8 without the BOM. – Dan W Oct 12 '12 at 15:24
  • 1
    @DanW: Is UTF-16 without BOM actually ever done, though? I'd never use that; it's bound to be a disaster to open on pretty much anything. – Nyerguds Feb 10 '16 at 17:22
11

Another option, very late in coming, sorry:

http://www.architectshack.com/TextFileEncodingDetector.ashx

This small C#-only class uses BOMS if present, tries to auto-detect possible unicode encodings otherwise, and falls back if none of the Unicode encodings is possible or likely.

It sounds like UTF8Checker referenced above does something similar, but I think this is slightly broader in scope - instead of just UTF8, it also checks for other possible Unicode encodings (UTF-16 LE or BE) that might be missing a BOM.

Hope this helps someone!

  • Pretty nice code, it solved my problem of encoding detection :) – CARLOS LOTH Apr 21 '12 at 9:45
6

The SimpleHelpers.FileEncoding Nuget package wraps a C# port of the Mozilla Universal Charset Detector into a dead-simple API:

var encoding = FileEncoding.DetectFileEncoding(txtFile);
  • this should be higher up, it provides a very simple solution: let others do the work :D – buddybubble Sep 27 '17 at 7:56
5

My solution is to use built-in stuffs with some fallbacks.

I picked the strategy from an answer to another similar question on stackoverflow but I can't find it now.

It checks the BOM first using the built-in logic in StreamReader, if there's BOM, the encoding will be something other than Encoding.Default, and we should trust that result.

If not, it checks whether the bytes sequence is valid UTF-8 sequence. if it is, it will guess UTF-8 as the encoding, and if not, again, the default ASCII encoding will be the result.

static Encoding getEncoding(string path) {
    var stream = new FileStream(path, FileMode.Open);
    var reader = new StreamReader(stream, Encoding.Default, true);
    reader.Read();

    if (reader.CurrentEncoding != Encoding.Default) {
        reader.Close();
        return reader.CurrentEncoding;
    }

    stream.Position = 0;

    reader = new StreamReader(stream, new UTF8Encoding(false, true));
    try {
        reader.ReadToEnd();
        reader.Close();
        return Encoding.UTF8;
    }
    catch (Exception) {
        reader.Close();
        return Encoding.Default;
    }
}
2

Note: this was an experiment to see how UTF-8 encoding worked internally. The solution offered by vilicvane, to use a UTF8Encoding object that is initialised to throw an exception on decoding failure, is much simpler, and basically does the same thing.


I wrote this piece of code to differentiate between UTF-8 and Windows-1252. It shouldn't be used for gigantic text files though, since it loads the entire thing into memory and scans it completely. I used it for .srt subtitle files, just to be able to save them back in the encoding in which they were loaded.

The encoding given to the function as ref should be the 8-bit fallback encoding to use in case the file is detected as not being valid UTF-8; generally, on Windows systems, this will be Windows-1252. This doesn't do anything fancy like checking actual valid ascii ranges though, and doesn't detect UTF-16 even on byte order mark.

The theory behind the bitwise detection can be found here: https://ianthehenry.com/2015/1/17/decoding-utf-8/

Basically, the bit range of the first byte determines how many after it are part of the UTF-8 entity. These bytes after it are always in the same bit range.

/// <summary>
///     Detects whether the encoding of the data is valid UTF-8 or ascii. If detection fails, the text is decoded using the given fallback encoding.
///     Bit-wise mechanism for detecting valid UTF-8 based on https://ianthehenry.com/2015/1/17/decoding-utf-8/
///     Note that pure ascii detection should not be trusted: it might mean the file is meant to be UTF-8 or Windows-1252 but simply contains no special characters.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="docBytes">The bytes of the text document.</param>
/// <param name="encoding">The default encoding to use as fallback if the text is detected not to be pure ascii or UTF-8 compliant. This ref parameter is changed to the detected encoding, or Windows-1252 if the given encoding parameter is null and the text is not valid UTF-8.</param>
/// <returns>The contents of the read file</returns>
public static String ReadFileAndGetEncoding(Byte[] docBytes, ref Encoding encoding)
{
    if (encoding == null)
        encoding = Encoding.GetEncoding(1252);
    // BOM detection is not added in this example. Add it yourself if you feel like it. Should set the "encoding" param and return the decoded string.
    //String file = DetectByBOM(docBytes, ref encoding);
    //if (file != null)
    //    return file;
    Boolean isPureAscii = true;
    Boolean isUtf8Valid = true;
    for (Int32 i = 0; i < docBytes.Length; i++)
    {
        Int32 skip = TestUtf8(docBytes, i);
        if (skip != 0)
        {
            if (isPureAscii)
                isPureAscii = false;
            if (skip < 0)
                isUtf8Valid = false;
            else
                i += skip;
        }
        // if already detected that it's not valid utf8, there's no sense in going on.
        if (!isUtf8Valid)
            break;
    }
    if (isPureAscii)
        encoding = new ASCIIEncoding(); // pure 7-bit ascii.
    else if (isUtf8Valid)
        encoding = new UTF8Encoding(false);
    // else, retain given fallback encoding.
    return encoding.GetString(docBytes);
}

/// <summary>
/// Tests if the bytes following the given offset are UTF-8 valid, and returns
/// the extra amount of bytes to skip ahead to do the next read if it is
/// (meaning, detecting a single-byte ascii character would return 0).
/// If the text is not UTF-8 valid it returns -1.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="binFile">Byte array to test</param>
/// <param name="offset">Offset in the byte array to test.</param>
/// <returns>The amount of extra bytes to skip ahead for the next read, or -1 if the byte sequence wasn't valid UTF-8</returns>
public static Int32 TestUtf8(Byte[] binFile, Int32 offset)
{
    Byte current = binFile[offset];
    if ((current & 0x80) == 0)
        return 0; // valid 7-bit ascii. Added length is 0 bytes.
    else
    {
        Int32 len = binFile.Length;
        Int32 fullmask = 0xC0;
        Int32 testmask = 0;
        for (Int32 addedlength = 1; addedlength < 6; addedlength++)
        {
            // This code adds shifted bits to get the desired full mask.
            // If the full mask is [111]0 0000, then test mask will be [110]0 0000. Since this is
            // effectively always the previous step in the iteration I just store it each time.
            testmask = fullmask;
            fullmask += (0x40 >> addedlength);
            // Test bit mask for this level
            if ((current & fullmask) == testmask)
            {
                // End of file. Might be cut off, but either way, deemed invalid.
                if (offset + addedlength >= len)
                    return -1;
                else
                {
                    // Lookahead. Pattern of any following bytes is always 10xxxxxx
                    for (Int32 i = 1; i <= addedlength; i++)
                    {
                        // If it does not match the pattern for an added byte, it is deemed invalid.
                        if ((binFile[offset + i] & 0xC0) != 0x80)
                            return -1;
                    }
                    return addedlength;
                }
            }
        }
        // Value is greater than the start of a 6-byte utf8 sequence. Deemed invalid.
        return -1;
    }
}
  • Also there is no last else statement after if ((current & 0xE0) == 0xC0) { ... } else if ((current & 0xF0) == 0xE0) { ... } else if ((current & 0xF0) == 0xE0) { ... } else if ((current & 0xF8) == 0xF0) { ... }. I suppose that else case would be invalid utf8: isUtf8Valid = false;. Would you? – hal Jan 20 '16 at 20:55
  • @hal Ah, true... I since updated my own code with a more general (and more advanced) system that uses a loop that goes up to 3 but can technically be changed to loop further (the specs are a bit unclear on that; it is possible to expand UTF-8 up to 6 added bytes I think, but only 3 are used in current implementations), so I didn't update this code. – Nyerguds Jan 22 '16 at 7:55
  • @hal Updated it to my new solution. The principle remains the same, but the bit masks are created and checked in a loop rather than all explicitly written out in code. – Nyerguds Mar 14 '16 at 13:12

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