4182

How do I make the first letter of a string uppercase, but not change the case of any of the other letters?

For example:

  • "this is a test""This is a test"
  • "the Eiffel Tower""The Eiffel Tower"
  • "/index.html""/index.html"
9
  • 16
    Underscore has a plugin called underscore.string that includes this and a bunch of other great tools. – Aaron Apr 15 '13 at 19:16
  • 171
    Simpler: string[0].toUpperCase() + string.substring(1) – dr.dimitru Nov 25 '15 at 4:00
  • 26
    `${s[0].toUpperCase()}${s.slice(1)}` – eaorak Nov 2 '19 at 20:20
  • 6
    ([initial, ...rest]) => [initial.toUpperCase(), ...rest].join("") – Константин Ван Jan 6 '20 at 6:49
  • 6
    Capitalize every word: str.replace(/(^\w|\s\w)/g, m => m.toUpperCase()) – chickens Mar 12 '20 at 13:14

104 Answers 104

19

The ucfirst function works if you do it like this.

function ucfirst(str) {
    var firstLetter = str.slice(0,1);
    return firstLetter.toUpperCase() + str.substring(1);
}

Thanks J-P for the aclaration.

6
  • 2
    nice name for the function! It's name is identical to the PHP equivalent. There is actually an entire library of PHP functions written in JS; it's called PHP.js and to be found on http://phpjs.org – Hussam Dec 8 '11 at 14:29
  • 11
    One liner: string[0].toUpperCase() + string.substring(1) – dr.dimitru Nov 25 '15 at 4:01
  • @TarranJones here is bulletproof one liner: (string[0] || '').toUpperCase() + string.substring(1) – dr.dimitru May 6 '16 at 18:20
  • @dr.dimitru: Instead of idiomatic (string[0] || '') you could just string.charAt(0). – Przemek Apr 24 '17 at 18:24
  • 1
    What is "aclaration"? – Peter Mortensen Jan 6 at 23:34
18

Here's my version. I think it's easy to understand and elegant too.

var str = "foo bar baz";

// Capitalize
str.split(' ')
    .map(w => w[0].toUpperCase() + w.substr(1).toLowerCase())
    .join(' ')
// Returns "Foo Bar Baz"

// Capitalize the first letter
str.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + str.slice(1)
// Returns "Foo bar baz"
16

A functional approach

const capitalize = ([s, ...tring]) =>
  [s.toUpperCase(), ...tring]
    .join('');

Then you could

const titleCase = str => 
  str
    .split(' ')
    .map(capitalize)
    .join(' ')
1
  • 2
    Don't forget toLowerCase() the remainder of the word. Passing a word in all caps to this current solution would keep it in all caps. – Aaron Tribou Sep 4 '18 at 11:19
15

The first character of every string is capitalized.

function capitalize(word){
    return word[0].toUpperCase() + word.slice(1).toLowerCase();
}

console.log(capitalize("john")); //John
console.log(capitalize("BRAVO")); //Bravo
console.log(capitalize("BLAne")); //Blane

3
  • first char of word to upper case = word[0].toUpperCase() skipe first char and lower rest = slice(1).toLowerCase(); – Omar bakhsh Available to work Jul 19 '20 at 1:10
  • 1
    This changes other characters too. The question asks "How do I make the first letter of a string uppercase, but not change the case of any of the other letters?" – Sean Aug 22 '20 at 20:28
  • you can ignore the other extra step of code : +word.slice(1).toLowerCase(); – Omar bakhsh Available to work Aug 23 '20 at 0:17
14

𝗔 𝗦𝗼𝗹𝘂𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗧𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗪𝗼𝗿𝗸𝘀 𝗙𝗼𝗿 𝗔𝗹𝗹 𝗨𝗻𝗶𝗰𝗼𝗱𝗲 𝗖𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗮𝗰𝘁𝗲𝗿𝘀

57 81 different answers for this question, some off-topic, and yet none of them raise the important issue that none of the solutions listed will work with Asian characters, emoji's, and other high Unicode-point-value characters in many browsers. Here is a solution that will:

const consistantCapitalizeFirstLetter = "\uD852\uDF62".length === 1 ?
    function(S) {
        "use-strict"; // Hooray! The browser uses UTF-32!
        return S.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + string.substring(1);
    } : function(S) {
        "use-strict";
        // The browser is using UCS16 to store UTF-16
        var code = S.charCodeAt(0)|0;
        return (
          code >= 0xD800 && code <= 0xDBFF ? // Detect surrogate pair
            S.slice(0,2).toUpperCase() + string.substring(2) :
            S.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + string.substring(1)
        );
    };
const prettyCapitalizeFirstLetter = "\uD852\uDF62".length === 1 ?
    function(S) {
        "use-strict"; // Hooray! The browser uses UTF-32!
        return S.charAt(0).toLocaleUpperCase() + string.substring(1);
    } : function(S) {
        "use-strict";
        // The browser is using UCS16 to store UTF-16
        var code = S.charCodeAt(0)|0;
        return (
          code >= 0xD800 && code <= 0xDBFF ? // Detect surrogate pair
            S.slice(0,2).toLocaleUpperCase() + string.substring(2) :
            S.charAt(0).toLocaleUpperCase() + string.substring(1)
        );
    };

Do note that the above solution tries to account for UTF-32. However, the specification officially states that browsers are required to do everything in UTF-16 mapped into UCS2. Nevertheless, if we all come together, do our part, and start preparing for UTF32, then there is a chance that the TC39 may allow browsers to start using UTF-32 (like how Python uses 24-bits for each character of the string). This must seem silly to an English speaker: no one who uses only latin-1 has ever had to deal with Mojibake because Latin-I is supported by all character encodings. But, users in other countries (such as China, Japan, Indonesia, etc.) are not so fortunate. They constantly struggle with encoding problems not just from the webpage, but also from the JavaScript: many Chinese/Japanese characters are treated as two letters by JavaScript and thus may be broken apart in the middle, resulting in � and � (two question-marks that make no sense to the end user). If we could start getting ready for UTF-32, then the TC39 might just allow browsers do what Python did many years ago which had made Python very popular for working with high Unicode characters: using UTF-32.

consistantCapitalizeFirstLetter works correctly in Internet Explorer 3+. prettyCapitalizeFirstLetter requires Internet Explorer 5.5+ (see the top of page 250 of this document). However, these fact are more of just jokes because it is very likely that the rest of the code on your webpage will not even work in Internet Explorer 8 - because of all the DOM and JScript bugs and lack of features in these older browsers. Further, no one uses Internet Explorer 3 or Internet Explorer 5.5 any more.

5
  • 1
    Glad to see an answer that brings up this concern. However, I don’t believe there are any browsers where String.fromCodePoint(65536).length === 1 will be true. That ES strings expose their UTF16ishness isn’t implementation-specific behavior — it’s a well-defined part of the spec, and it can’t be fixed due to backwards compat. – Semicolon Dec 26 '18 at 10:48
  • 1
    @Semicolon Thank you for pointing out a flaw with my answer. I have appended an additional explanation accordingly. – Jack Giffin Apr 25 '19 at 16:30
  • 1
    Re: the new final notes, WHATWG and co have landed on UTF-8 as the sole ‘correct’ encoding for all text interchange on the platform. This isn’t gonna change (and it’s a good thing). The ES issue is distinct from that, though — it’s about ES having a string abstraction where the code units of the internal ‘utf-16 + lone surrogates’ encoding (it’s neither UTF-16 nor UCS2 quite) ‘break through’ when using indexed address, String.prototype.length, etc. (1/2) – Semicolon Apr 25 '19 at 20:54
  • 1
    The body responsible for ES is TC39 rather than W3C (or WHATWG, etc), and they cannot change the existing functionality because it would break the web. Instead, they can introduce new functionality that behaves correctly. They already have begun doing this — the 'u' flag on RegExp, String.prototype.codePointAt, and String.prototype[@@iterator] provide safer alternatives to the old APIs. (2/2) – Semicolon Apr 25 '19 at 20:55
  • @Semicolon Thank you for your correction. I have edited the content appropriately. – Jack Giffin Apr 25 '19 at 20:58
13

In CoffeeScript, add to the prototype for a string:

String::capitalize = ->
  @substr(0, 1).toUpperCase() + @substr(1)

Usage would be:

"woobie".capitalize()

Which yields:

"Woobie"
5
  • 12
    This is a JavaScript question. – Cobby May 6 '14 at 0:54
  • 15
    @Cobby - And this is a coffeescript answer. – longda May 6 '14 at 19:29
  • I think what Cobby is trying to say that some idiots are trying to accomplish every simple JavaScript task using stupid libraries while the very same solution in vanilla is as simple as String.prototype.capitalize = function () { return this.substring(0,1).toUpperCase() + this.substring(1).toLowerrCase() } – Shiala Jul 16 '14 at 17:17
  • 2
    Coffeescript is a preprocessor language, not a library... A library for this would be silly – TaylorMac Jul 30 '14 at 20:18
  • 4
    Let the record state: CoffeeScript is a little language that compiles into JavaScript. Furthermore, The golden rule of CoffeeScript is: "It's just JavaScript." I think if someone truly understands those two sentences, you'll understand why I included this answer. Hopefully that cleared things up for everyone. Source: coffeescript.org – longda Jul 30 '14 at 23:28
13

Posting an edit of @salim's answer to include locale letter transformation.

var str = "test string";
str = str.substring(0,1).toLocaleUpperCase() + str.substring(1);
3
  • Man, this should be at the first page at very least – YakovL Dec 28 '17 at 16:42
  • I would go str = str.charAt(0).toLocaleUpperCase() + str.substr(1);, though, to make this shorter – YakovL Dec 28 '17 at 20:31
  • There is currently no answer by a user with the name "salim" (user names can change at any time). What answer does it refer to? – Peter Mortensen Jan 6 at 23:23
13
function capitalize(string) {
    return string.replace(/^./, Function.call.bind("".toUpperCase));
}
2
  • this capitalizes the whole string – henhen Jun 25 '18 at 19:09
  • 2
    @henhen no, the regex character ^ asserts position at start. then . matches a single character – Martin Burch Jun 28 '18 at 16:51
13

There are already so many good answers, but you can also use a simple CSS transform:

text-transform: capitalize;

div.c {
  text-transform: capitalize;
}
<h2>text-transform: capitalize:</h2>
<div class="c">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.</div>

3
13

CoffeeScript

ucfirst = (str) -> str.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + str.slice(1)

As a String prototype method:

String::capitalize = -> @charAt(0).toUpperCase() + @slice(1)
1
  • 2
    Stupid question but how would you add this to the String prototype in coffeescript? – longda Aug 15 '12 at 17:54
12
// Uppercase first letter
function ucfirst(field) {
    field.value = field.value.substr(0, 1).toUpperCase() + field.value.substr(1);
}

Usage:

<input type="text" onKeyup="ucfirst(this)" />
1
  • 2
    There was no reference to an input field or the requirement of an event to handle this. Aside from that, field.value could be shortened with a variable for readability. – abestic9 May 17 '13 at 2:29
11

One possible solution:

function ConvertFirstCharacterToUpperCase(text) {
    return text.substr(0, 1).toUpperCase() + text.substr(1);    
}

Use this:

 alert(ConvertFirstCharacterToUpperCase("this is string"));

Here is working JS Fiddle

11

Using the JS replace string method & a regular expression w/ a word boundary seems simple.

Capitalize the first words' first character: "the eiffel tower" --> "The eiffel tower"

str.replace(/\b\w/, v => v.toUpperCase())

Capitalize all words' first character: "the eiffel tower" --> "The Eiffel Tower"

str.replace(/\b\w/g, v => v.toUpperCase())
11
/*
 * As terse as possible, assuming you're using ES version 6+
 */
var upLetter1=s=>s.replace(/./,m=>m.toUpperCase());

console.log(upLetter1("the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog."));
//\\ The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog. //\\
11

Using an arrow function:

const capitalize = string => string[0].toUpperCase() + string.slice(1)
11

This solution might be new and probably the simplest.

function firstUpperCase(input)
{
    return input[0].toUpperCase() + input.substr(1);
}

console.log(firstUpperCase("capitalize first letter"));

0
10

Using prototypes

String.prototype.capitalize = function () {
    return this.charAt(0) + this.slice(1).toLowerCase();
  }

or Using functions

function capitalize(str) {
return str.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + str.slice(1).toLowerCase();
}
0
10

a.slice(0,1).toUpperCase()+a.slice(1)

let a = 'hello',
    fix = a.slice(0,1).toUpperCase()+a.slice(1)
    
console.log(fix)

10

There are multiple ways of doing this try some below

var lower = 'the Eiffel Tower';
var upper = lower.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + lower.substr(1);

And if you are comfortable with regular expressions, you do things this way:

var upper = lower.replace(/^\w/, function (chr) {
  return chr.toUpperCase();
});

And you can even take it one step further by using more modern syntax:

const upper = lower.replace(/^\w/, c => c.toUpperCase());

Also this will take care of negative scenarios as mentioned in example like words starting with special characters like !@#$%^&*()}{{[];':",.<>/? .

10

Unicode and Locale Aware

Using current language features:

function capitalize([firstLetter, ...rest]) {
  return [firstLetter.toLocaleUpperCase(), ...rest].join('');
}

console.log(capitalize('foo bar'));
console.log(capitalize('ѷҥӕ'))
console.log(capitalize('🎁❄💊🎸⭐'));

// Title Case
console.log(
  'Title Case:',
  'foo bar'
    .split(/\s+/)
    .map(capitalize)
    .join(' '),
);

We accept a destructured string as the only parameter [firstLetter, ...rest], assigning the first character to the variable firstLetter and get an array for the rest of the characters (...rest) bound to the rest variable. E.g. for the string lorem ipsum this should look like:

capitalize('lorem ipsum');
// firstLetter = 'l'
// rest = ['o', 'r', 'e', 'm', ' ', 'i', 'p', 's', 'u', 'm'];

Now all we need to do is prepend an uppercased version of the first letter firstLetter.toLocaleUpperCase() to the rest array—using the spread operator—and join the resulting array into a string using .join('')

1
  • 1
    can you explain your function capitalize. – Amit Jamwal Nov 20 '19 at 10:34
9

Or you could use Sugar.js capitalize()

Example:

'hello'.capitalize()           -> 'Hello'
'hello kitty'.capitalize()     -> 'Hello kitty'
'hello kitty'.capitalize(true) -> 'Hello Kitty'
9

Here is my attempt to make a universal function that can capitalize only the first letter, or the first letter of each word, including words separated by a dash (like some first names in French).

By default, the function capitalizes only the first letter and leave the rest untouched.

Parameters:

  • lc: true to lowercase the rest of the word(s)
  • all: true to capitalize each word

 

if (typeof String.prototype.capitalize !== 'function') {
    String.prototype.capitalize = function(lc, all) {
        if (all) {
            return this.split( " " ).map( function(currentValue, index, array ) {
                return currentValue.capitalize( lc );
            }, this).join(" ").split("-").map(function(currentValue, index, array) {
                return currentValue.capitalize(false);
            }, this).join("-");
        }
        else {
            return lc ? this.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + this.slice(1 ).toLowerCase() : this.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + this.slice(1);
        }
    }
}
1
  • jQuery to update user's input capitalized: $('.on-change-capitalize').change(function(){ $(this).val($(this).val().capitalize(true, true)); }); btw, it also works with utf8 chars ;) thanks! – Lukas Liesis Apr 4 '14 at 6:51
8

If you go with one of the regex answers, remember they will only work with ASCII characters. All your unicode letters will not be uppercased. The XRegExp library and its unicode plugins solve this problem if you want to stick with regexps. So something like this would work:

String.prototype.capitalize = function () {
    return this.replace(XRegExp("^\\p{L}"), function ($0) { return $0.toUpperCase(); })
}

Considering that it still doesn't cover all possibilities (combined characters, see http://www.regular-expressions.info/unicode.html) it seems easier to just use the .charAt(0).toUpperCase() approach.

1
  • `String.prototype.capitalize = String.prototype.capitalize || function() { var first = this.substring(0,1); return first.toUpperCase() + this.substring(1); }; – Dhiraj Himani Feb 6 '17 at 7:47
8
var capitalizeMe = "string not starting with capital"

Capitalize with substr

var capitalized = capitalizeMe.substr(0, 1).toUpperCase() + capitalizeMe.substr(1);
8

For just capitalizing the first letter and make the rest of the string lower case:

function capitalize(str) {
     var splittedEnter = str.split(" ");
     var capitalized;
     var capitalizedResult;
     for (var i = 0 ; i < splittedEnter.length ; i++){
         capitalized = splittedEnter[i].charAt(0).toUpperCase();
         splittedEnter[i] = capitalized + splittedEnter[i].substr(1).toLowerCase();
    }
    return splittedEnter.join(" ");
}

capitalize("tHiS wiLL be alL CapiTaLiZED.");

The result will be:

This Will Be All Capitalized.

0
8

I would just use a regular expression:

myString = '    the quick green alligator...';
myString.trim().replace(/^\w/, (c) => c.toUpperCase());
7

Okay, so I am new to JavaScript. I wasn't able to get the above to work for me. So I started putting it together myself. Here's my idea (about the same, different and working syntax):

String name = request.getParameter("name");
name = name.toUpperCase().charAt(0) + name.substring(1);
out.println(name);

Here I get the variable from a form (it also works manually):

String name = "i am a Smartypants...";
name = name.toUpperCase().charAt(0) + name.substring(1);
out.println(name);

Output: "I am a Smartypants...";

7

1. We'll be using CSS to achieve this. It can also be set from an external CSS.

<span text-transform="capitalize ">The first letter of each word becomes an upper case</span>

2. Using vanilla JavaScript, we could do:

let string = "test case"

string = string[0].toUpperCase() + string.substring(1)
//return "Test case"

Explanation</b/>:

string[0].toUpperCase(): converts the first letter in the string to upper case

string.substring(1): deletes the first letter in the string and returns the remaining characters

text-transform="capitalize": make the first letter of each word in this tag upper case. If you use 'uppercase' as the value of text-transform, every letter in the tag will be a capital letter

0
7

Elegant

const capitalize = ([firstChar, ...rest]) => `${firstChar.toUpperCase()}${rest.join('')}`;
1
  • Doesn't look very elegant to me, not very readable. Typical example of overcomplicating something simple. – Thorvald May 31 at 12:36
6

Like it:

function capitalize(string,a) {
    var tempstr = string.toLowerCase();
    if (a == false || a == undefined)
        return tempstr.replace(tempstr[0], tempstr[0].toUpperCase());
    else {
        return tempstr.split(" ").map(function (i) { return i[0].toUpperCase() + i.substring(1) }).join(" ");
    }
}


capitalize('stack overflow yeah!',true)); //Stack Overflow Yeah!

capitalize('stack stack stack stack overflow yeah!'));//Stack overflow yeah!

https://jsfiddle.net/dgmLgv7b/

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