14

Say I have the following HTML:

<figure>
<img alt="Sun" src="sun.gif" width="256" height="256" />
<figcaption>The Sun - a sinister and destructive force. Image from
the SOHO research facility.</figcaption>
</figure>

If I want the text to wrap to the width of the image, I need this CSS:

figure {
    display: table;
    width: 1px;
}

If I want the image to be "responsive" — that is, be no bigger than the viewport — I need this CSS too:

img {
    max-width: 100%;
}

But combining these two results in a terrible mess! Now that the img's parent has an explicit width set, the max-width causes the whole figure to be really, really tiny (although not quite 1px).

So is it possible to use CSS (2 or 3) to achieve both an image caption wrapped to no wider than the image, and an image no wider than the viewport?

32

Old question, but I came across the same issue and was able to come up with a fairly neat solution, inspired by this.

HTML:

<figure>
   <img src="http://www.placehold.it/300x150" alt="" />
   <figcaption>Make me as long as you like</figcaption>
</figure>​

CSS:

figure {
   background-color: #fff;
   padding: 5px;
   font-size: .875em;
   display: table;
}

figure img {
    display: block;
    width: 100%;
}

figcaption {
    display: table-caption;
    caption-side: bottom;
    background: #fff;
    padding: 0 5px 5px;
}​

This ensures the figcaption does not exceed the width of the figure, whilst allowing you to keep max-width on the image. Works in all good browsers and IE8+.

There's a Firefox bug that prevents max-width working within elements that are set to display: table. So, instead of using max-width on the image, setting its width to 100% means this works cross-browser. The figure's width will be whatever the native width of the image is, unless that width is restricted in some other way.

  • Works like a charm - thanks ! But why max-width anyway ? – Stefan Steiger Aug 22 '13 at 6:30
  • It gets a little complicated in this context (using table for the layout), but in general max-width: 100% is used for responsive designs to ensure that images never exceed the width of their container, breaking the layout. If our wrapper or figure is fluid rather than fixed then this becomes important. See A List Apart. In this instance you might want to have other styles or a fixed width on the figure for example. – CherryFlavourPez Aug 22 '13 at 10:28
  • 1
    Not sure if this was just me but I found I had to add: width: 100%; to the figcaption selector, otherwise it was really narrow and didn't span the width of the image. – Trevor May 23 '14 at 18:18
  • 1
    @Spooky - interesting, cheers. I could have sworn that I tested this cross-browser (but it was more than a year ago now and I can't remember what I ate last night...). Anyway, I've made a small edit to the answer and tested this working in Firefox 35 and IE11. Let me know if that works in your case. – CherryFlavourPez Feb 5 '15 at 10:52
  • 1
    @Spooky - show me a design that you can't achieve with this: I like a challenge! You're right, there may be instances where additional markup is necessary, but I've used this on numerous sites of varying styles with no problems. – CherryFlavourPez Feb 17 '15 at 10:03
4

So is it possible to use CSS (2 or 3) to achieve both an image caption wrapped to no wider than the image, and an image no wider than the viewport?

Yes. Just use viewport units on the img - max-width: 100vw; instead of % - max-width: 100%;

DEMO

Just for completeness:

There are 2 other techniques to get the text to wrap to the width of the image:

1) Set display: table-caption; on the figcaption

DEMO

2) Set width: min-content on the figure

DEMO

0

Is image scaling important? If not, then consider using background images.

PURE CSS:

<figure>
<div class="caption">
<figcaption>The Sun - a sinister and destructive force. Image from
the SOHO research facility.</figcaption>
</div>
</figure>
<style type="text/css">
figure{display:table;width:1px;position:relative;}
figure div.caption{
background:url(sun.gif) no-repeat 0 0 scroll;
width:256px;
height:256px;
position:absolute;
}
</style>

CSS WITH INLINE STYLING:

<figure>
<div class="caption" style="background:url(sun.gif) no-repeat 0 0 scroll;width:256px;height:256px;">
<figcaption>The Sun - a sinister and destructive force. Image from
the SOHO research facility.</figcaption>
</div>
</figure>
<style type="text/css">
figure{display:table;width:1px;position:relative;}
figure div.caption{position:absolute;}
</style>
  • Doesn't this mean I'd need a CSS declaration for each image? – detly Apr 22 '12 at 2:50
  • It would, yes. If you were planning on rendering the HTML in a server-side loop, you could always set the background-image and dimensions with inline styling to save time (see second example). Either way, if you want the caption width to be bounded by the image dimensions, those settings are going to have to be made by hand. – maiorano84 Apr 22 '12 at 3:26
0

Super old question, but I am currently in the same situation and I think I have found a very easy solution. Admittedly I have only tested this in the latest versions which at this time are: IE 11 FF 37 Chrome 40

<figure>
   <img>
   <figcaption>
</figure>

figure {
   display: table;
   width: 50px; /* Set this to the minimum caption width */
}

And that's it. I don't know if it's a quirk that will be fixed in future but it works very well right now. If the image is larger than 50px, the figure and figcaption will automatically resize. If it is less than 50px, the caption stay 50px;

0

If I want the text to wrap to the width of the image, I need this CSS: [...]

Instead of hardcoding a size use min-content.

figure {
    display: block;
    border: 1px dotted blue;
    margin: 3px;
}
figure>figure {
    display: inline-block;
    border: 2px solid red;
    width: min-content;
}
<figure>
	<figure>
	 <img src="https://dummyimage.com/200x100" alt="An image of a bunny rabbit."/>
		<figcaption>Lorem ipsum  </figcaption>
	</figure>
	<figure>
	 <img src="https://dummyimage.com/200x100"  alt="An image of a bunny rabbit." />
		<figcaption>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur</figcaption>
	</figure>
	<figure>
	 <img src="https://dummyimage.com/200x100" alt="An image of a bunny rabbit."/>
		<figcaption>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Repellat, molestiae, similique ullam labore soluta autem </figcaption>
	</figure>
	<figure>
		 <img src="https://dummyimage.com/200x100" alt="An image of a bunny rabbit."/>
		<figcaption>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Repellat, molestiae, similique ullam labore soluta autem placeat officia </figcaption>
	</figure>
</figure>

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