I'm attempting to write a simple ScopeGuard based on Alexandrescu concepts but with c++11 idioms.

namespace RAII
{
    template< typename Lambda >
    class ScopeGuard
    {
        mutable bool committed;
        Lambda rollbackLambda; 
        public:

            ScopeGuard( const Lambda& _l) : committed(false) , rollbackLambda(_l) {}

            template< typename AdquireLambda >
            ScopeGuard( const AdquireLambda& _al , const Lambda& _l) : committed(false) , rollbackLambda(_l)
            {
                _al();
            }

            ~ScopeGuard()
            {
                if (!committed)
                    rollbackLambda();
            }
            inline void commit() const { committed = true; }
    };

    template< typename aLambda , typename rLambda>
    const ScopeGuard< rLambda >& makeScopeGuard( const aLambda& _a , const rLambda& _r)
    {
        return ScopeGuard< rLambda >( _a , _r );
    }

    template<typename rLambda>
    const ScopeGuard< rLambda >& makeScopeGuard(const rLambda& _r)
    {
        return ScopeGuard< rLambda >(_r );
    }
}

Here is the usage:

void SomeFuncThatShouldBehaveAtomicallyInCaseOfExceptions() 
{
   std::vector<int> myVec;
   std::vector<int> someOtherVec;

   myVec.push_back(5);
   //first constructor, adquire happens elsewhere
   const auto& a = RAII::makeScopeGuard( [&]() { myVec.pop_back(); } );  

   //sintactically neater, since everything happens in a single line
   const auto& b = RAII::makeScopeGuard( [&]() { someOtherVec.push_back(42); }
                     , [&]() { someOtherVec.pop_back(); } ); 

   b.commit();
   a.commit();
}

Since my version is way shorter than most examples out there (like Boost ScopeExit) i'm wondering what specialties i'm leaving out. Hopefully i'm in a 80/20 scenario here (where i got 80 percent of neatness with 20 percent of lines of code), but i couldn't help but wonder if i'm missing something important, or is there some shortcoming worth mentioning of this version of the ScopeGuard idiom

thanks!

Edit I noticed a very important issue with the makeScopeGuard that takes the adquire lambda in the constructor. If the adquire lambda throws, then the release lambda is never called, because the scope guard was never fully constructed. In many cases, this is the desired behavior, but i feel that sometimes a version that will invoke rollback if a throw happens is desired as well:

//WARNING: only safe if adquire lambda does not throw, otherwise release lambda is never invoked, because the scope guard never finished initialistion..
template< typename aLambda , typename rLambda>
ScopeGuard< rLambda > // return by value is the preferred C++11 way.
makeScopeGuardThatDoesNOTRollbackIfAdquireThrows( aLambda&& _a , rLambda&& _r) // again perfect forwarding
{
    return ScopeGuard< rLambda >( std::forward<aLambda>(_a) , std::forward<rLambda>(_r )); // *** no longer UB, because we're returning by value
}

template< typename aLambda , typename rLambda>
ScopeGuard< rLambda > // return by value is the preferred C++11 way.
makeScopeGuardThatDoesRollbackIfAdquireThrows( aLambda&& _a , rLambda&& _r) // again perfect forwarding
{
    auto scope = ScopeGuard< rLambda >(std::forward<rLambda>(_r )); // *** no longer UB, because we're returning by value
    _a();
    return scope;
}

so for completeness, i want to put in here the complete code, including tests:


#include <vector>

namespace RAII
{

    template< typename Lambda >
    class ScopeGuard
    {
        bool committed;
        Lambda rollbackLambda; 
        public:

            ScopeGuard( const Lambda& _l) : committed(false) , rollbackLambda(_l) {}

            ScopeGuard( const ScopeGuard& _sc) : committed(false) , rollbackLambda(_sc.rollbackLambda) 
            {
                if (_sc.committed)
                   committed = true;
                else
                   _sc.commit();
            }

            ScopeGuard( ScopeGuard&& _sc) : committed(false) , rollbackLambda(_sc.rollbackLambda)
            {
                if (_sc.committed)
                   committed = true;
                else
                   _sc.commit();
            }

            //WARNING: only safe if adquire lambda does not throw, otherwise release lambda is never invoked, because the scope guard never finished initialistion..
            template< typename AdquireLambda >
            ScopeGuard( const AdquireLambda& _al , const Lambda& _l) : committed(false) , rollbackLambda(_l)
            {
               std::forward<AdquireLambda>(_al)();
            }

            //WARNING: only safe if adquire lambda does not throw, otherwise release lambda is never invoked, because the scope guard never finished initialistion..
            template< typename AdquireLambda, typename L >
            ScopeGuard( AdquireLambda&& _al , L&& _l) : committed(false) , rollbackLambda(std::forward<L>(_l))
            {
                std::forward<AdquireLambda>(_al)(); // just in case the functor has &&-qualified operator()
            }


            ~ScopeGuard()
            {
                if (!committed)
                    rollbackLambda();
            }
            inline void commit() { committed = true; }
    };


    //WARNING: only safe if adquire lambda does not throw, otherwise release lambda is never invoked, because the scope guard never finished initialistion..
    template< typename aLambda , typename rLambda>
    ScopeGuard< rLambda > // return by value is the preferred C++11 way.
    makeScopeGuardThatDoesNOTRollbackIfAdquireThrows( aLambda&& _a , rLambda&& _r) // again perfect forwarding
    {
        return ScopeGuard< rLambda >( std::forward<aLambda>(_a) , std::forward<rLambda>(_r )); // *** no longer UB, because we're returning by value
    }

    template< typename aLambda , typename rLambda>
    ScopeGuard< rLambda > // return by value is the preferred C++11 way.
    makeScopeGuardThatDoesRollbackIfAdquireThrows( aLambda&& _a , rLambda&& _r) // again perfect forwarding
    {
        auto scope = ScopeGuard< rLambda >(std::forward<rLambda>(_r )); // *** no longer UB, because we're returning by value
        _a();
        return scope;
    }

    template<typename rLambda>
    ScopeGuard< rLambda > makeScopeGuard(rLambda&& _r)
    {
        return ScopeGuard< rLambda >( std::forward<rLambda>(_r ));
    }

    namespace basic_usage
    {
        struct Test
        {

            std::vector<int> myVec;
            std::vector<int> someOtherVec;
            bool shouldThrow;
            void run()
            {
                shouldThrow = true;
                try
                {
                    SomeFuncThatShouldBehaveAtomicallyInCaseOfExceptionsUsingScopeGuardsThatDoesNOTRollbackIfAdquireThrows();
                } catch (...)
                {
                    AssertMsg( myVec.size() == 0 && someOtherVec.size() == 0 , "rollback did not work");
                }
                shouldThrow = false;
                SomeFuncThatShouldBehaveAtomicallyInCaseOfExceptionsUsingScopeGuardsThatDoesNOTRollbackIfAdquireThrows();
                AssertMsg( myVec.size() == 1 && someOtherVec.size() == 1 , "unexpected end state");
                shouldThrow = true;
                myVec.clear(); someOtherVec.clear();  
                try
                {
                    SomeFuncThatShouldBehaveAtomicallyInCaseOfExceptionsUsingScopeGuardsThatDoesRollbackIfAdquireThrows();
                } catch (...)
                {
                    AssertMsg( myVec.size() == 0 && someOtherVec.size() == 0 , "rollback did not work");
                }
            }

            void SomeFuncThatShouldBehaveAtomicallyInCaseOfExceptionsUsingScopeGuardsThatDoesNOTRollbackIfAdquireThrows() //throw()
            {

                myVec.push_back(42);
                auto a = RAII::makeScopeGuard( [&]() { HAssertMsg( myVec.size() > 0 , "attempt to call pop_back() in empty myVec"); myVec.pop_back(); } );  

                auto b = RAII::makeScopeGuardThatDoesNOTRollbackIfAdquireThrows( [&]() { someOtherVec.push_back(42); }
                                    , [&]() { HAssertMsg( myVec.size() > 0 , "attempt to call pop_back() in empty someOtherVec"); someOtherVec.pop_back(); } );

                if (shouldThrow) throw 1; 

                b.commit();
                a.commit();
            }

            void SomeFuncThatShouldBehaveAtomicallyInCaseOfExceptionsUsingScopeGuardsThatDoesRollbackIfAdquireThrows() //throw()
            {
                myVec.push_back(42);
                auto a = RAII::makeScopeGuard( [&]() { HAssertMsg( myVec.size() > 0 , "attempt to call pop_back() in empty myVec"); myVec.pop_back(); } );  

                auto b = RAII::makeScopeGuardThatDoesRollbackIfAdquireThrows( [&]() { someOtherVec.push_back(42); if (shouldThrow) throw 1; }
                                    , [&]() { HAssertMsg( myVec.size() > 0 , "attempt to call pop_back() in empty someOtherVec"); someOtherVec.pop_back(); } );

                b.commit();
                a.commit();
            }
        };
    }
}
  • 3
    One thing you're leaving out is that this code doesn't quite compile. The declarations of the guard variables are missing template parameters. – R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 22 '12 at 17:36
  • 8
    @lursher I am not your compiler. The code still doesn't compile for the same reasons. You could avoid wasting everyone's time if you tried to compile your code before posting it. – R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 22 '12 at 17:52
  • 1
    @lurscher, if I were you, I wouldn't make commited mutable, but I'd remove const from commit() - after all, commit() changes the state of the object - and that change is important; why the function that changes important part of object state would be marked const? – Griwes Apr 22 '12 at 17:52
  • 1
    @Griwes, because a reference to a temporary can only be held with const references. This is explained in the original Alexandrescu article about ScopeGuard – lurscher Apr 22 '12 at 18:02
  • 1
    @lurscher Or with an rvalue reference. – R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 22 '12 at 18:05

11 Answers 11

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Boost.ScopeExit is a macro that needs to work with non-C++11 code, i.e. code that has no access to lambdas in the language. It uses some clever template hacks (like abusing the ambiguity that arises from using < for both templates and comparison operators!) and the preprocessor to emulate lambda features. That's why the code is longer.

The code shown is also buggy (which is probably the strongest reason to use an existing solution): it invokes undefined behaviour due to returning references to temporaries.

Since you're trying to use C++11 features, the code could be improved a lot by using move semantics, rvalue references and perfect-forwarding:

template< typename Lambda >
class ScopeGuard
{
    bool committed; // not mutable
    Lambda rollbackLambda; 
    public:


        // make sure this is not a copy ctor
        template <typename L,
                  DisableIf<std::is_same<RemoveReference<RemoveCv<L>>, ScopeGuard<Lambda>>> =_
        >
        /* see http://loungecpp.net/w/EnableIf_in_C%2B%2B11
         * and http://stackoverflow.com/q/10180552/46642 for info on DisableIf
         */
        explicit ScopeGuard(L&& _l)
        // explicit, unless you want implicit conversions from *everything*
        : committed(false)
        , rollbackLambda(std::forward<L>(_l)) // avoid copying unless necessary
        {}

        template< typename AdquireLambda, typename L >
        ScopeGuard( AdquireLambda&& _al , L&& _l) : committed(false) , rollbackLambda(std::forward<L>(_l))
        {
            std::forward<AdquireLambda>(_al)(); // just in case the functor has &&-qualified operator()
        }

        // move constructor
        ScopeGuard(ScopeGuard&& that)
        : committed(that.committed)
        , rollbackLambda(std::move(that.rollbackLambda)) {
            that.committed = true;
        }

        ~ScopeGuard()
        {
            if (!committed)
                rollbackLambda(); // what if this throws?
        }
        void commit() { committed = true; } // no need for const
};

template< typename aLambda , typename rLambda>
ScopeGuard< rLambda > // return by value is the preferred C++11 way.
makeScopeGuard( aLambda&& _a , rLambda&& _r) // again perfect forwarding
{
    return ScopeGuard< rLambda >( std::forward<aLambda>(_a) , std::forward<rLambda>(_r )); // *** no longer UB, because we're returning by value
}

template<typename rLambda>
ScopeGuard< rLambda > makeScopeGuard(rLambda&& _r)
{
    return ScopeGuard< rLambda >( std::forward<rLambda>(_r ));
}
  • R. Martinho, read the Herb Sutter blog posted by mirk, const references to temporaries is not undefined behavior – lurscher Apr 22 '12 at 18:44
  • 9
    @lurscher No, you go back and read it carefully. The functions there return by value. – R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 22 '12 at 18:48
  • 1
    right, right right... so this does not happen because the return type reference is already killing the temporary at return, thanks for opening my eyes, i wouldn't have notice that – lurscher Apr 22 '12 at 18:50
  • 1
    @lurscher There's a very comprehensive explanation here: stackoverflow.com/a/8610728/46642. It's not a feature you'll use everyday, but when writing generic code, it's good to be as generic as possible. :) – R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 23 '12 at 19:43
  • 1
    Couldn't you significantly simplify this by using non-template class and storing the cleanup function in std::function? – Shachar Shemesh Apr 26 '14 at 5:38

Even shorter: I don't know why you guys insist on putting the template on the guard class.

#include <functional>

class scope_guard {
public: 
    template<class Callable> 
    scope_guard(Callable && undo_func) try : f(std::forward<Callable>(undo_func)) {
    } catch(...) {
        undo_func();
        throw;
    }

    scope_guard(scope_guard && other) : f(std::move(other.f)) {
        other.f = nullptr;
    }

    ~scope_guard() {
        if(f) f(); // must not throw
    }

    void dismiss() noexcept {
        f = nullptr;
    }

    scope_guard(const scope_guard&) = delete;
    void operator = (const scope_guard&) = delete;

private:
    std::function<void()> f;
};

Note that it is essential that the cleanup code does not throw, otherwise you get in similar situations as with throwing destructors.

Usage:

// do step 1
step1();
scope_guard guard1 = [&]() {
    // revert step 1
    revert1();
};

// step 2
step2();
guard1.dismiss();

My inspiration was the same DrDobbs article as for the OP.


Edit 2017/2018: After watching (some of) Andrei's presentation that André linked to (I skipped to the end where it said "Painfully Close to Ideal!") I realized that it's doable. Most of the time you don't want to have extra guards for everything. You just do stuff, and in the end it either succeeds or rollback should happen.

Edit 2018: Added execution policy which removed the necessity of the dismiss call.

#include <functional>
#include <deque>

class scope_guard {
public:
    enum execution { always, no_exception, exception };

    scope_guard(scope_guard &&) = default;
    explicit scope_guard(execution policy = always) : policy(policy) {}

    template<class Callable>
    scope_guard(Callable && func, execution policy = always) : policy(policy) {
        this->operator += <Callable>(std::forward<Callable>(func));
    }

    template<class Callable>
    scope_guard& operator += (Callable && func) try {
        handlers.emplace_front(std::forward<Callable>(func));
        return *this;
    } catch(...) {
        if(policy != no_exception) func();
        throw;
    }

    ~scope_guard() {
        if(policy == always || (std::uncaught_exception() == (policy == exception))) {
            for(auto &f : handlers) try {
                f(); // must not throw
            } catch(...) { /* std::terminate(); ? */ }
        }
    }

    void dismiss() noexcept {
        handlers.clear();
    }

private:
    scope_guard(const scope_guard&) = delete;
    void operator = (const scope_guard&) = delete;

    std::deque<std::function<void()>> handlers;
    execution policy = always;
};

Usage:

scope_guard scope_exit, scope_fail(scope_guard::execution::exception);

action1();
scope_exit += [](){ cleanup1(); };
scope_fail += [](){ rollback1(); };

action2();
scope_exit += [](){ cleanup2(); };
scope_fail += [](){ rollback2(); };

// ...
  • 4
    "I don't know why you guys insist on putting the template on the guard class" - we didn't think to hide it behind std::function's type erasure! – M.M Aug 20 '15 at 4:32
  • 9
    Do note that if the captured variables don't fit within the in-place buffer of std::function, it will incur dynamic allocation. – mpark Feb 9 '16 at 4:39
  • 1
    @mpark If this is a concern you could use function pointers, e.g. you could write scope_guard guard1 = revert1;. – Fozi Feb 9 '16 at 14:38
  • 1
    Also, std::function<Fn> uses a level of indirection and thus has more overhead. – Brandon Kohn Jul 15 '16 at 12:06
  • 1
    throw() is deprecated in C++11, noexcept replaces it. – Zitrax Dec 9 '16 at 13:03

You might be interested in seeing this presentation by Andrei himself on his own taken on how to improve scopedguard with c++11

  • Yup, this one is the right answer. Clean, simple. – Christopher Smith Sep 15 '14 at 9:24
  • 9
    I would likely vote for answer if you would also summarize Andrei's answer to the OP's question here... What happens if that link rots? – U007D Oct 27 '16 at 23:48
  • 3
    Yes summary needed - the link is a 70 minute long video presentation. – Zitrax Dec 9 '16 at 13:25
  • The implementation details of the ScopeGuard start at the 1:19:30 mark of the video. However the presenter, Andrei, also maintains the Loki library, which includes a ScopeGuard implementation. It's worth a look. – cemdervis Jan 25 at 12:33

You can use std::unique_ptr for that purpose which implements the RAII pattern. For example:

vector<int> v{};
v.push_back(42);
unique_ptr<decltype(v), function<void(decltype(v)*)>>
    p{&v, [] (decltype(v)* v) { if (uncaught_exception()) { v->pop_back(); }}};
throw exception(); // rollback 
p.release(); // explicit commit

The deleter function from the unique_ptr p rolls the formerly inserted value back, if the scope was left while an exception is active. If you prefer an explicit commit, you can remove the uncaugth_exception() question in the deleter function and add at the end of the block p.release() which releases the pointer. See Demo here.

There's a chance this approach will be standardized in C++17 or in the Library Fundamentals TS through proposal P0052R0

template <typename EF>
scope_exit<see below> make_scope_exit(EF &&exit_function) noexcept;

template <typename EF>
scope_exit<see below> make_scope_fail(EF && exit_function) noexcept;

template <typename EF>
scope_exit<see below> make_scope_success(EF && exit_function) noexcept;

On first glance this has the same caveat as std::async because you have to store the return value or the destructor will be called immediately and it won't work as expected.

makeScopeGuard returns a const reference. You can't store this const reference in a const ref at the caller's side in a line like:

const auto& a = RAII::makeScopeGuard( [&]() { myVec.pop_back(); } ); 

So you are invoking undefined behaviour.

Herb Sutter GOTW 88 gives some background about storing values in const references.

  • mirk, precisely that blog post says that is allowed, is not undefined behavior: "Normally, a temporary object lasts only until the end of the full expression in which it appears. However, C++ deliberately specifies that binding a temporary object to a reference to const on the stack lengthens the lifetime of the temporary to the lifetime of the reference itself, and thus avoids what would otherwise be a common dangling-reference error." – lurscher Apr 22 '12 at 18:42
  • 2
    @lurscher the full expression in which it appears is in the return statement. The temporary is destroyed when the function ends. – R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 22 '12 at 18:44
  • 3
    @lurscher Indeed. Please notice however, that in the blog the functions return values. In the code in the question above, references are returned by the functions. – mirk Apr 22 '12 at 18:45
  • @mirk, yeah. i missed the fact that the function was returning by value in Sutter example, and my was returning by reference, thanks! – lurscher Apr 22 '12 at 18:55
  • To suppress warning unused variable 'a' [-Wunused-variable] use [[gnu::unused]] attribute: [[gnu::unused]] auto const & a = .... – Orient Jul 31 '15 at 11:40

Without commitment tracking, but extremely neat and fast.

template <typename F>
struct ScopeExit {
    ScopeExit(F&& f) : m_f(std::forward<F>(f)) {}
    ~ScopeExit() { m_f(); }
    F m_f;
};

template <typename F>
ScopeExit<F> makeScopeExit(F&& f) {
    return ScopeExit<F>(std::forward<F>(f));
};

#define STRING_JOIN(arg1, arg2) STRING_JOIN2(arg1, arg2)
#define STRING_JOIN2(arg1, arg2) arg1 ## arg2

#define ON_SCOPE_EXIT(code) auto STRING_JOIN(scopeExit, __LINE__) = makeScopeExit([&](){code;})

Usage

{
    puts("a");
    auto _ = makeScopeExit([]() { puts("b"); });
    // More readable with a macro
    ON_SCOPE_EXIT(puts("c"));
} # prints a, c, b

I use this works like a charm, no extra code.

shared_ptr<int> x(NULL, [&](int *) { CloseResource(); });

You already chosen an answer, but I'll take the challenge anyway:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <utility>

template < typename RollbackLambda >
class ScopeGuard;

template < typename RollbackLambda >
auto  make_ScopeGuard( RollbackLambda &&r ) -> ScopeGuard<typename
 std::decay<RollbackLambda>::type>;

template < typename RollbackLambda >
class ScopeGuard
{
    // The input may have any of: cv-qualifiers, l-value reference, or both;
    // so I don't do an exact template match.  I want the return to be just
    // "ScopeGuard," but I can't figure it out right now, so I'll make every
    // version a friend.
    template < typename AnyRollbackLambda >
    friend
    auto make_ScopeGuard( AnyRollbackLambda && ) -> ScopeGuard<typename
     std::decay<AnyRollbackLambda>::type>;

public:
    using lambda_type = RollbackLambda;

private:
    // Keep the lambda, of course, and if you really need it at the end
    bool        committed;
    lambda_type  rollback;

    // Keep the main constructor private so regular creation goes through the
    // external function.
    explicit  ScopeGuard( lambda_type rollback_action )
        : committed{ false }, rollback{ std::move(rollback_action) }
    {}

public:
    // Do allow moves
    ScopeGuard( ScopeGuard &&that )
        : committed{ that.committed }, rollback{ std::move(that.rollback) }
    { that.committed = true; }
    ScopeGuard( ScopeGuard const & ) = delete;

    // Cancel the roll-back from being called.
    void  commit()  { committed = true; }

    // The magic happens in the destructor.
    // (Too bad that there's still no way, AFAIK, to reliably check if you're
    // already in exception-caused stack unwinding.  For now, we just hope the
    // roll-back doesn't throw.)
    ~ScopeGuard()  { if (not committed) rollback(); }
};

template < typename RollbackLambda >
auto  make_ScopeGuard( RollbackLambda &&r ) -> ScopeGuard<typename
 std::decay<RollbackLambda>::type>
{
    using std::forward;

    return ScopeGuard<typename std::decay<RollbackLambda>::type>{
     forward<RollbackLambda>(r) };
}

template < typename ActionLambda, typename RollbackLambda >
auto  make_ScopeGuard( ActionLambda && a, RollbackLambda &&r, bool
 roll_back_if_action_throws ) -> ScopeGuard<typename
 std::decay<RollbackLambda>::type>
{
    using std::forward;

    if ( not roll_back_if_action_throws )  forward<ActionLambda>(a)();
    auto  result = make_ScopeGuard( forward<RollbackLambda>(r) );
    if ( roll_back_if_action_throws )  forward<ActionLambda>(a)();
    return result;
}

int  main()
{
    auto aa = make_ScopeGuard( []{std::cout << "Woah" << '\n';} );
    int  b = 1;

    try {
     auto bb = make_ScopeGuard( [&]{b *= 2; throw b;}, [&]{b = 0;}, true );
    } catch (...) {}
    std::cout << b++ << '\n';
    try {
     auto bb = make_ScopeGuard( [&]{b *= 2; throw b;}, [&]{b = 0;}, false );
    } catch (...) {}
    std::cout << b++ << '\n';

    return 0;
}
// Should write: "0", "2", and "Woah" in that order on separate lines.

Instead of having creation functions and a constructor, you limited to just the creation functions, with the main constructor being private. I couldn't figure out how to limit the friend-ed instantiations to just the ones involving the current template parameter. (Maybe because the parameter is mentioned only in the return type.) Maybe a fix to that can be asked on this site. Since the first action doesn't need to be stored, it's present only in the creation functions. There's a Boolean parameter to flag if throwing from the first action triggers a roll-back or not.

The std::decay part strips both cv-qualifiers and reference markers. But you can't use it for this general purpose if the input type is a built-in array, since it'll apply the array-to-pointer conversion too.

Here's another one, now a variation on @kwarnke's:

std::vector< int > v{ };

v.push_back( 42 );

auto guard_handler =
[ & v ] ( nullptr_t ptr )
{
    v.pop_back( );
};

std::shared_ptr< decltype( guard_handler ) > guard( nullptr , std::move( guard_handler ) );

Yet another answer, but I am afraid I find the others all lacking in one way or another. Notably, the accepted answer dates from 2012, but it has an important bug (see this comment). This shows the importance of testing.

Here is an implementation of a >=C++11 scope_guard that is openly available and extensively tested. It is meant to be/have:

  • modern, elegant, simple (mostly single-function interface and no macros)
  • general (accepts any callable that respects preconditions)
  • carefully documented
  • thin callback wrapping (no added std::function or virtual table penalties)
  • proper exception specifications

See also the full list of features.

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.