I have created an unordered list. I feel the bullets in the unordered list are bothersome, so I want to remove them.

Is it possible to have a list without bullets?

26 Answers 26

up vote 3166 down vote accepted

You can remove bullets by setting the list-style to none on the CSS for parent element (typically a <ul>).

ul {
  list-style: none;
}

You might also want to add padding: 0 and margin: 0 to that, if you want to remove indentation as well.

See Listutorial for a great walkthrough of list formatting techniques.

  • 98
    doesn't work on IE9, you need to ad list-style-type:none; to li – tovmeod Apr 3 '12 at 8:25
  • 27
    @robaker it only took them 15 yrs to get it right and when most people aren't even using IE10 yet. sigh... Somehow I hate M$. lol – Panama Jack Jul 22 '13 at 12:02
  • 57
    We are not designing for IE9 in 2015, for record – Dom Vinyard Jul 13 '15 at 22:29
  • 6
    If we consider IE also then no website can be completed in this century. – Ankit Apr 7 '16 at 16:36
  • 7
    @DomVinyard We are still designing for IE8 in 2016, for record... – Amy Barrett May 5 '16 at 15:03

If you're using Bootstrap, it has an "unstyled" class:

Remove the default list-style and left padding on list items (immediate children only).

Bootstrap 2:

<ul class="unstyled">
   <li>...</li>
</ul>

http://twitter.github.io/bootstrap/base-css.html#typography

Bootstrap 3 and 4:

<ul class="list-unstyled">
   <li>...</li>
</ul>

http://getbootstrap.com/css/#type-lists

  • 49
    In Boostrap 3 this has changed a bit to: class="list-unstyled" – guido Sep 1 '13 at 16:02
  • 1
    Just wondering where you guys read this? I've been looking for it but haven't found it. – Skytiger Sep 4 '13 at 11:31
  • 8
    @Skytiger getbootstrap.com/css/#type-lists – Danation Oct 6 '13 at 2:15
  • 2
    Bootstrap 3 class also works with Bootstrap 4 – Christophe Roussy Mar 8 '17 at 16:26
  • 1
    Actually, this answer is exactly what I was looking for. And Bootstrap is used by 3.6% of the entire Internet, so it's not falling. trends.builtwith.com/docinfo/Twitter-Bootstrap A quick Google search reveals that Bootstrap is consistently placed in the "most popular CSS frameworks" category. – Bobort May 10 at 14:38

You need to use list-style: none;

<ul style="list-style: none;">
    <li> ...</li>
</ul>
  • 2
    Great solution. I was looking for a solution that didn't involve you editing the CSS file. Thanks a lot! – Kevin Groen Jul 31 '14 at 8:52
  • 7
    @Kevin: That is inline CSS... best practices considered, you really should put this in a CSS file. – aboveyou00 Feb 14 '16 at 18:11
  • Excellent solution especially if the CSS keeps overriding the desired formatting. – Mohammed Feb 13 '17 at 17:35
  • This answer works without Bootstrap. Also, it does not need to build a extra *.css file. Actually, this is a typical example of how to embed css code into a single html file. – anonymous Mar 15 '17 at 13:53
  • 2
    'best practice' is often in the eye of the beholder - and/or for the particular application. The instance this helped me is where the majority of lists are fine with the bullet, however, I wanted to make my own icons on one particular list. Changing the .css would affect all of the lists, while inline takes care of just the one. So, sometimes 'best' is what you need at the point you need it. – CFP Support Jun 16 at 14:01

in css , style ,

 list-style-type: none;

You would have to add a style to the <ul> element like the following:

<ul style="list-style: none; ">
    <li>Item</li>
    ...
    <li>Item</li>
</ul>

That will remove the bullets. You could also add the CSS in a stylesheet like the examples above.

  • 4
    now in > 3.0 it's .list-unstyled – Adam Pflantzer Jun 27 '14 at 14:49
  • in > 3.0 you may need to add it to the li as well – codechurn Nov 5 '15 at 16:56
  • 4
    @AdamPflantzer what is 3.0 supposed to mean. No connection to question nor to answer – Ghostwriter78 Oct 12 '16 at 5:44
  • He's referring to Bootstrap, which has nothing to do with this answer. – Bobort May 10 at 14:39

in css...

ul {
   list-style:none;
}

Small refinement to the above: To make longer lines more readable if they spill over to additional screen lines:

ul, li {list-style-type: none;}

li {padding-left: 2em; text-indent: -2em;}
  • Works, but only for IE8 – Underverse May 21 '14 at 1:53

Use the following CSS:

ul {
  list-style-type: none
}

Native:

ul { list-style-type: none; }

Bootstrap:

<ul class="list-unstyled list-group">
    <li class="list-group-item">...</li>
</ul>

Note: If you're using list-groups, then there is no need for list-unstyled.

I used list-style on both the ul and the li to remove the bullets. I wanted to replace the bullets with a custom character, in this case a 'dash', that gives a nice effect. So using this markup:

<ul class="dashed-list">
  <li>text</li>
  <li>text</li>
</ul>

with this css:

ul.dashed-list
{
    list-style: none outside none;
}

ul.dashed-list li:before {
    content: "\2014";
    float: left;
    margin: 0 0 0 -27px;
    padding: 0;
}

ul.dashed-list li {
    list-style-type: none;
}

gives a nicely indented effect that works when the text wraps

If you're unable to make it works at the <ul> level, you might need to place the list-style-type: none; at the <li> level:

<ul>
    <li style="list-style-type: none;">Item 1</li>
    <li style="list-style-type: none;">Item 2</li>
</ul>

You can create a CSS class to avoid this repetition:

<style>
ul.no-bullets li 
{
    list-style-type: none;
}
</style>

<ul class="no-bullets">
    <li>Item 1</li>
    <li>Item 2</li>
</ul>

EDIT: When necessary, use !important:

<style>
ul.no-bullets li 
{
    list-style-type: none !important;
}
</style>

CSS:

.liststyle {
    list-style-type: none;
}

HTML:

<ul class="liststyle">
    <li>Test</li>
</ul>
  • This is the same as the top answer, essentially. – Dan Dascalescu Jan 28 '17 at 0:34

CSS CODE

ul
{
list-style-type: none;
}

HTML CODE

<ul>
<li><a href="#">Item One</a></li>
<li><a href="#">Item Two</a></li>   
</ul>
  • This is the same as the top answer, essentially. – Dan Dascalescu Jan 28 '17 at 0:33

You can remove bullets by using the following CSS:

    ul {
         list-style: none; //or list-style-type:none; 
       }

You may even add your custom list style like:

li:before {
            content: '✔';
            color:red;
          }

This orders list vertically without bullet points. In just one line!

 li{
        display: block;
    }

You can remove the "bullets" by setting the "list-style-type: none;" Like

ul
{
    list-style-type: none;
}

OR

<ul class="menu custompozition4"  style="list-style-type: none;">
    <li class="item-507"><a href=#">Strategic Recruitment Solutions</a>
    </li>

</ul>

Below code is a good and simple example to removed bullets for an unordered list

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>

<h2>Unordered List without Bullets</h2>

<ul style="list-style-type:none">
  <li>Coffee</li>
  <li>Tea</li>
  <li>Milk</li>
</ul>  

</body>
</html>

Just change your list-style-type or list-style in your class to none for the <li>.

Something like this:

li {
  list-style-type : none;
}

Also for further information, I list all properties you can assign to list-style-type, run the code below to see all the result in one goal:

.none {
  list-style-type: none;
}

.disc {
  list-style-type: disc;
}

.circle {
  list-style-type: circle;
}

.square {
  list-style-type: square;
}

.decimal {
  list-style-type: decimal;
}

.georgian {
  list-style-type: georgian;
}

.cjk-ideographic {
  list-style-type: cjk-ideographic;
}

.kannada {
  list-style-type: kannada;
}

.custom:before {
  content: '◊ ';
  color: red;
}
<ul>
  <li class="none">none</li>
  <li class="disc">disc</li>
  <li class="circle">circle</li>
  <li class="square">square</li>
  <li class="decimal">decimal</li>
  <li class="georgian">georgian</li>
  <li class="cjk-ideographic">cjk-ideographic</li>
  <li class="kannada">kannada</li>
  <li class="none custom">custom</li>
</ul>

If you wanted to accomplish this with pure HTML alone, this solution will work across all major browsers:

Description Lists

Simply using the following HTML:

<dl>
  <dt>List Item 1</dt>
    <dd>Sub-Item 1.1</dd>
  <dt>List Item 2</dt>
    <dd>Sub-Item 2.1</dd>
    <dd>Sub-Item 2.2</dd>
    <dd>Sub-Item 2.3</dd>
  <dt>List Item 3</dt>
    <dd>Sub-Item 3.1</dd>
</dl>

Which will produce a list similar to the following:

List Item 1
     Sub-Item 1.1
List Item 2
     Sub-Item 2.1
     Sub-Item 2.2
     Sub-Item 2.3
List Item 3
     Sub-Item 3.1

Example here: https://jsfiddle.net/zumcmvma/2/

Reference here: https://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_dl.asp

  • If you're going to use this method, use the semantically proper way of entering a term to be defined in <dt> and the definition of that term in <dd>. – Bobort May 10 at 14:41

What i tried and observed was

header ul{
   margin: 0;
   padding: 0;
}

You can remove bullets using style="list-style-type:none".

Try this:

<ul style="list-style-type:none" >

     <li>op1</li>
     <li>op2</li>
     <li>op2</li>

</ul> 

You need to use css list-style-type: none;

ul {
  list-style-type: none;
}

As previously mentioned, the best way to do this is by adding list-style-type: none to the ul element. There is a great article on bullet styles I think you could benefit from here.

 <div class="custom-control custom-checkbox left">
    <ul class="list-unstyled">
        <li>
         <label class="btn btn-secondary text-left" style="width:100%;text-align:left;padding:2px;">
           <input type="checkbox" style="zoom:1.7;vertical-align:bottom;" asp-for="@Model[i].IsChecked" class="custom-control-input" /> @Model[i].Title
         </label>
        </li>
     </ul>
</div>

Even you can do this.

ul {
  display: initial;
}

In case you want to keep things simple without resorting to css, I just put a &nbsp; in my code lines. I.e. <table></table> Yeah it leaves a few spaces but thats no bad thing.

  • 9
    -1 Simple? Without CSS? This is why many websites are in the shocking state they are. CSS adds simplicity. Tables are not the way forward. – webnoob Mar 15 '13 at 10:59
  • 1
    Please use the "edit" link to update your answer. – ChrisF Mar 15 '13 at 11:03
  • 6
    If every browser has a slightly different implementation of something as basic as this (All of these suggestions don't work in Chrome for me) and tables provide a clean, convenient means of getting it done which works in all browsers, then by all means, use what works. +1 for a solution that actually works. – M Lamb Mar 22 '13 at 6:10
  • 7
    Hear, hear. He's only getting downvoted because of the <table>-bashers. +1. – Scott Stafford May 1 '13 at 18:05

protected by Community Mar 15 '13 at 11:03

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