308

I have a link button inside a <td> which I have to disable. This works on IE but not working in Firefox and Chrome. Structure is - Link inside a <td>. I cannot add any container in the <td> (like div/span)

I tried all the following but not working on Firefox (using 1.4.2 js):

$(td).children().each(function () {
        $(this).attr('disabled', 'disabled');
  });


  $(td).children().attr('disabled', 'disabled');

  $(td).children().attr('disabled', true);

  $(td).children().attr('disabled', 'true');

Note - I cannot de-register the click function for the anchor tag as it is registered dynamically. AND I HAVE TO SHOW THE LINK IN DISABLED MODE.

1

16 Answers 16

567

You can't disable a link (in a portable way). You can use one of these techniques (each one with its own benefits and disadvantages).

CSS way

This should be the right way (but see later) to do it when most of browsers will support it:

a.disabled {
    pointer-events: none;
}

It's what, for example, Bootstrap 3.x does. Currently (2016) it's well supported only by Chrome, FireFox and Opera (19+). Internet Explorer started to support this from version 11 but not for links however it's available in an outer element like:

span.disable-links {
    pointer-events: none;
}

With:

<span class="disable-links"><a href="#">...</a></span>

Workaround

We, probably, need to define a CSS class for pointer-events: none but what if we reuse the disabled attribute instead of a CSS class? Strictly speaking disabled is not supported for <a> but browsers won't complain for unknown attributes. Using the disabled attribute IE will ignore pointer-events but it will honor IE specific disabled attribute; other CSS compliant browsers will ignore unknown disabled attribute and honor pointer-events. Easier to write than to explain:

a[disabled] {
    pointer-events: none;
}

Another option for IE 11 is to set display of link elements to block or inline-block:

<a style="pointer-events: none; display: inline-block;" href="#">...</a>

Note that this may be a portable solution if you need to support IE (and you can change your HTML) but...

All this said please note that pointer-events disables only...pointer events. Links will still be navigable through keyboard then you also need to apply one of the other techniques described here.

Focus

In conjunction with above described CSS technique you may use tabindex in a non-standard way to prevent an element to be focused:

<a href="#" disabled tabindex="-1">...</a>

I never checked its compatibility with many browsers then you may want to test it by yourself before using this. It has the advantage to work without JavaScript. Unfortunately (but obviously) tabindex cannot be changed from CSS.

Intercept clicks

Use a href to a JavaScript function, check for the condition (or the disabled attribute itself) and do nothing in case.

$("td > a").on("click", function(event){
    if ($(this).is("[disabled]")) {
        event.preventDefault();
    }
});

To disable links do this:

$("td > a").attr("disabled", "disabled");

To re-enable them:

$("td > a").removeAttr("disabled");

If you want instead of .is("[disabled]") you may use .attr("disabled") != undefined (jQuery 1.6+ will always return undefined when the attribute is not set) but is() is much more clear (thanks to Dave Stewart for this tip). Please note here I'm using the disabled attribute in a non-standard way, if you care about this then replace attribute with a class and replace .is("[disabled]") with .hasClass("disabled") (adding and removing with addClass() and removeClass()).

Zoltán Tamási noted in a comment that "in some cases the click event is already bound to some "real" function (for example using knockoutjs) In that case the event handler ordering can cause some troubles. Hence I implemented disabled links by binding a return false handler to the link's touchstart, mousedown and keydown events. It has some drawbacks (it will prevent touch scrolling started on the link)" but handling keyboard events also has the benefit to prevent keyboard navigation.

Note that if href isn't cleared it's possible for the user to manually visit that page.

Clear the link

Clear the href attribute. With this code you do not add an event handler but you change the link itself. Use this code to disable links:

$("td > a").each(function() {
    this.data("href", this.attr("href"))
        .attr("href", "javascript:void(0)")
        .attr("disabled", "disabled");
});

And this one to re-enable them:

$("td > a").each(function() {
    this.attr("href", this.data("href")).removeAttr("disabled");
});

Personally I do not like this solution very much (if you do not have to do more with disabled links) but it may be more compatible because of various way to follow a link.

Fake click handler

Add/remove an onclick function where you return false, link won't be followed. To disable links:

$("td > a").attr("disabled", "disabled").on("click", function() {
    return false; 
});

To re-enable them:

$("td > a").removeAttr("disabled").off("click");

I do not think there is a reason to prefer this solution instead of the first one.

Styling

Styling is even more simple, whatever solution you're using to disable the link we did add a disabled attribute so you can use following CSS rule:

a[disabled] {
    color: gray;
}

If you're using a class instead of attribute:

a.disabled {
    color: gray;
}

If you're using an UI framework you may see that disabled links aren't styled properly. Bootstrap 3.x, for example, handles this scenario and button is correctly styled both with disabled attribute and with .disabled class. If, instead, you're clearing the link (or using one of the others JavaScript techniques) you must also handle styling because an <a> without href is still painted as enabled.

Accessible Rich Internet Applications (ARIA)

Do not forget to also include an attribute aria-disabled="true" together with disabled attribute/class.

15
  • 2
    Right. But for easier maintenance I would add click event handlers to all td as that might be disabled, which will call event.preventDefault() if $(this).data('disabled') is true, and then set data('disabled', true) to any link I want to disable (false to enable, etc.)
    – ori
    Apr 23, 2012 at 7:15
  • 1
    @Ankit For appearance you have CSS! Set-up a rule for 'disabled' links like this a[disabled] { color: gray } Apr 23, 2012 at 8:59
  • 1
    Quick update on browser-support. Note even though IE11 supports pointer-events, there is a small tidbit that says it doesn't work on links :(...
    – aug
    Oct 23, 2014 at 20:16
  • 1
    $(this).is('[disabled]') might be a nicer way to detect the disabled attribute Feb 3, 2015 at 18:05
  • 3
    Jon, I don't like it much. First of all because keyboard navigation still works. Second because it's a trick (them it may be useful only if nothing else works). Third because some people keep Javascript disabled and in this case you don't have any "level" of protection. Fourth because it's the most complicate solution here (when few Javascript lines may work) Jun 8, 2016 at 18:30
24

Got the fix in css.

td.disabledAnchor a{
       pointer-events: none !important;
       cursor: default;
       color:Gray;
}

Above css when applied to the anchor tag will disable the click event.

For details checkout this link

7
  • 1
    It's a nice solution but it's not supported by...guess...Internet Explorer. Apr 23, 2012 at 14:32
  • Its supported by all browsers
    – Ankit
    May 2, 2012 at 6:56
  • 1
    It shouldn't be supported for HTML in Internet Explorer and Opera. May 2, 2012 at 7:18
  • @Ankit, it doesnt work in IE 9 and below. Are you using IE 10? Jun 29, 2013 at 6:56
  • 5
    This fails the keyboard events use case as Adriano Repetti mentions above. The user can still tab to the link and press enter. Sep 18, 2016 at 16:28
13

Thanks to everyone that posted solutions (especially @AdrianoRepetti), I combined multiple approaches to provide some more advanced disabled functionality (and it works cross browser). The code is below (both ES2015 and coffeescript based on your preference).

This provides for multiple levels of defense so that Anchors marked as disable actually behave as such. Using this approach, you get an anchor that you cannot:

  • click
  • tab to and hit return
  • tabbing to it will move focus to the next focusable element
  • it is aware if the anchor is subsequently enabled

How to

  1. Include this css, as it is the first line of defense. This assumes the selector you use is a.disabled

    a.disabled {
      pointer-events: none;
      cursor: default;
    }
    
  2. Next, instantiate this class on ready (with optional selector):

      new AnchorDisabler()
    

ES2015 Class

npm install -S key.js

import {Key, Keycodes} from 'key.js'

export default class AnchorDisabler {
  constructor (config = { selector: 'a.disabled' }) {
    this.config = config
    $(this.config.selector)
      .click((ev) => this.onClick(ev))
      .keyup((ev) => this.onKeyup(ev))
      .focus((ev) => this.onFocus(ev))
  }

  isStillDisabled (ev) {
    //  since disabled can be a class or an attribute, and it can be dynamically removed, always recheck on a watched event
    let target = $(ev.target)
    if (target.hasClass('disabled') || target.prop('disabled') == 'disabled') {
      return true
    }
    else {
      return false
    }
  }

  onFocus (ev) {
    //  if an attempt is made to focus on a disabled element, just move it along to the next focusable one.
    if (!this.isStillDisabled(ev)) {
      return
    }

    let focusables = $(':focusable')
    if (!focusables) {
      return
    }

    let current = focusables.index(ev.target)
    let next = null
    if (focusables.eq(current + 1).length) {
      next = focusables.eq(current + 1)
    } else {
      next = focusables.eq(0)
    }

    if (next) {
      next.focus()
    }
  }

  onClick (ev) {
    // disabled could be dynamically removed
    if (!this.isStillDisabled(ev)) {
      return
    }

    ev.preventDefault()
    return false
  }

  onKeyup (ev) {
    // We are only interested in disabling Enter so get out fast
    if (Key.isNot(ev, Keycodes.ENTER)) {
      return
    }

    // disabled could be dynamically removed
    if (!this.isStillDisabled(ev)) {
      return
    }

    ev.preventDefault()
    return false
  }
}

Coffescript class:

class AnchorDisabler
  constructor: (selector = 'a.disabled') ->
    $(selector).click(@onClick).keyup(@onKeyup).focus(@onFocus)

  isStillDisabled: (ev) =>
    ### since disabled can be a class or an attribute, and it can be dynamically removed, always recheck on a watched event ###
    target = $(ev.target)
    return true if target.hasClass('disabled')
    return true if target.attr('disabled') is 'disabled'
    return false

  onFocus: (ev) =>
    ### if an attempt is made to focus on a disabled element, just move it along to the next focusable one. ###
    return unless @isStillDisabled(ev)

    focusables = $(':focusable')
    return unless focusables

    current = focusables.index(ev.target)
    next = (if focusables.eq(current + 1).length then focusables.eq(current + 1) else focusables.eq(0))

    next.focus() if next


  onClick: (ev) =>
    # disabled could be dynamically removed
    return unless @isStillDisabled(ev)

    ev.preventDefault()
    return false

  onKeyup: (ev) =>

    # 13 is the js key code for Enter, we are only interested in disabling that so get out fast
    code = ev.keyCode or ev.which
    return unless code is 13

    # disabled could be dynamically removed
    return unless @isStillDisabled(ev)

    ev.preventDefault()
    return false
2
  • But what if we need a straight jQuery/javascript solution? See my answer below. Jun 8, 2016 at 17:55
  • 1
    Well, then you use the ES2015 class I just added!
    – kross
    Jun 8, 2016 at 21:17
7

Try the element:

$(td).find('a').attr('disabled', 'disabled');

Disabling a link works for me in Chrome: http://jsfiddle.net/KeesCBakker/LGYpz/.

Firefox doesn't seem to play nice. This example works:

<a id="a1" href="http://www.google.com">Google 1</a>
<a id="a2" href="http://www.google.com">Google 2</a>

$('#a1').attr('disabled', 'disabled');

$(document).on('click', 'a', function(e) {
    if ($(this).attr('disabled') == 'disabled') {
        e.preventDefault();
    }
});

Note: added a 'live' statement for future disabled / enabled links.
Note2: changed 'live' into 'on'.

5
  • 6
    The new example should work in Firefox as well. ;-) it's a firefix :D Apr 23, 2012 at 8:20
  • Chrome prevents navigation in jsFiddle due to "Refused to display document because display forbidden by X-Frame-Options." Sorry if the jsfiddle example does weird things ;-) Apr 23, 2012 at 8:26
  • I have to show the anchor tag as disabled also. Same as is shown in IE. Plus i dont want to modify the click function to place a check if it is disabled
    – Ankit
    Apr 23, 2012 at 8:29
  • The show-part can be done by css and adding a class that makes it grayed out. The advantage of the 'live' click is that you'll fix the problem for all links. If I can help more, just let me know. Hope you'll succeed. Apr 23, 2012 at 8:36
  • Try my answer below for a fully cross browser solution! Jun 8, 2016 at 17:56
5

Bootstrap 4.1 provides a class named disabled and aria-disabled="true" attribute.

example"

<a href="#" 
        class="btn btn-primary btn-lg disabled" 
        tabindex="-1" 
        role="button" aria-disabled="true"
>
    Primary link
</a>

More is on getbootstrap.com

So if you want to make it dynamically, and you don't want to care if it is button or ancor than in JS script you need something like that

   let $btn=$('.myClass');
   $btn.attr('disabled', true);
   if ($btn[0].tagName == 'A'){
        $btn.off();
        $btn.addClass('disabled');
        $btn.attr('aria-disabled', true);
   }

But be carefull

The solution only works on links with classes btn btn-link.

Sometimes bootstrap recommends using card-link class, in this case solution will not work.

2

I've ended up with the solution below, which can work with either an attribute, <a href="..." disabled="disabled">, or a class <a href="..." class="disabled">:

CSS Styles:

a[disabled=disabled], a.disabled {
    color: gray;
    cursor: default;
}

a[disabled=disabled]:hover, a.disabled:hover {
    text-decoration: none;
}

Javascript (in jQuery ready):

$("a[disabled], a.disabled").on("click", function(e){

    var $this = $(this);
    if ($this.is("[disabled=disabled]") || $this.hasClass("disabled"))
        e.preventDefault();
})
1

Just add a css property:

<style>   
a {
 pointer-events: none;
}
</style>

Doing so you can disable the anchor tag.

0
1

You can disable the HTML link as given below:

<style>
    .disabled-link {
        pointer-events: none;
    }
</style>
<a href="https://google.com" class="disabled-link">Google.com</a>

You can use inline JavaScript:

<a href="javascript:void(0)">Google.com</a>
0

you cannot disable a link, if you want that click event should not fire then simply Remove the action from that link.

$(td).find('a').attr('href', '');

For More Info :- Elements that can be Disabled

1
  • 1
    This doesn't really disable the link. The anchor element will still trigger, even though it will remain on the same page. Apr 23, 2012 at 7:22
0

I would do something like

$('td').find('a').each(function(){
 $(this).addClass('disabled-link');
});

$('.disabled-link').on('click', false);

something like this should work. You add a class for links you want to have disabled and then you return false when someone click them. To enable them just remove the class.

1
  • This would not help. I have to re-register the click event and the function is dynamic which is called. Once removed, I cannot associate it back
    – Ankit
    Apr 23, 2012 at 8:11
0

To disable link to access another page on touch device:

if (control == false)
  document.getElementById('id_link').setAttribute('href', '#');
else
  document.getElementById('id_link').setAttribute('href', 'page/link.html');
end if;
2
  • My answer works on mobile too. Very cross browser. See below. Jun 8, 2016 at 17:57
  • This is wrong, if you setAttribute('href', ''); and the page url is http://example.com/page/?query=something the link when clicked on IE11 would go to http://example.com/page/. A workaround could be to use setAttribute('href', '#'); Jan 9, 2019 at 15:43
0

In Razor (.cshtml) you can do:

@{
    var isDisabled = true;
}

<a href="@(isDisabled ? "#" : @Url.Action("Index", "Home"))" @(isDisabled ? "disabled=disabled" : "") class="btn btn-default btn-lg btn-block">Home</a>
0

I would suggest turning the link into a button and using the 'disabled' attribute. You can see this issue to check how to convert a link to a button: How to create an HTML button that acts like a link

-2

You can use this to disabled the Hyperlink of asp.net or link buttons in html.

$("td > a").attr("disabled", "disabled").on("click", function() {
    return false; 
});
-2

There is one other possible way, and the one that I like best. Basically it's the same way lightbox disables a whole page, by placing a div and fiddling with z-index. Here is relevant snippets from a project of mine. This works in all browsers!!!!!

Javascript (jQuery):

var windowResizer = function(){
        var offset = $('#back').offset();   
        var buttontop = offset.top;
        var buttonleft = offset.left;
        $('#backdisabler').css({'top':buttontop,'left':buttonleft,'visibility':'visible'});
        offset = $('#next').offset();
        buttontop = offset.top;
        buttonleft = offset.left;
        $('#nextdisabler').css({'top':buttontop,'left':buttonleft,'visibility':'visible'});
}

$(document).ready(function() {
    $(window).resize(function() {   
        setTimeout(function() {
            windowResizer();
        }, 5); //when the maximize/restore buttons are pressed, we have to wait or it will fire to fast
    });
});

and in html

<a href="" id="back" style="float: left"><img src="images/icons/back.png" style="height: 50px; width: 50px" /></a>
<a href="" id="next" style="float: right"><img src="images/icons/next.png" style="height: 50px; width: 50px" /></a>
<img id="backdisabler" src="images/icons/disabled.png" style="visibility: hidden; position: absolute; padding: 5px; height: 62px; width: 62px; z-index: 9000"/>
<img id="nextdisabler" src="images/icons/disabled.png" style="visibility: hidden; position: absolute; padding: 5px; height: 62px; width: 62px; z-index: 9000"/>

So the resizer finds the anchor's (the images are just arrows) locations and places the disabler on top. The disabler's image is a translucent grey square (change the width/height of the disablers in the html to match your link) to show that it is disabled. The floating allows the page to resize dynamically, and the disablers will follow suit in windowResizer(). You can find suitable images through google. I have placed the relevant css inline for simplicity.

then based on some condition,

$('#backdisabler').css({'visibility':'hidden'});
$('#nextdisabler').css({'visibility':'visible'});
1
  • 5
    Did not downvoted, but my guess: too much overhead for a simple thing, your code isn't commented enough for an answer on SO. It's also feeling a lot hacky, I personally would not use that. Jun 29, 2016 at 14:32
-5

I think a lot of these are over thinking. Add a class of whatever you want, like disabled_link.
Then make the css have .disabled_link { display: none }
Boom now the user can't see the link so you won't have to worry about them clicking it. If they do something to satisfy the link being clickable, simply remove the class with jQuery:
$("a.disabled_link").removeClass("super_disabled"). Boom done!

2
  • From the question: 'AND I HAVE TO SHOW THE LINK IN DISABLED MODE.'
    – Marcelo
    Nov 7, 2014 at 20:45
  • Yup, you are right. I missed that. So I would say instead, move href value to data-href $("td a").each(function(i,v){ $(this).data('href',this.href); $(this).attr('href','#').css('color','grey'); }); Then when you want to undisable one: $(this).attr('href',$(this).data('href')).css('color','blue'); Nov 14, 2014 at 18:05

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.