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I have a requirement to prepend "ticket:N" to commit messages, where N is the number of the ticket I'm working on. But I keep forgetting about the prefix and remember about it only 5-6 commits later, so --amend won't help. Is it possible to set some warning, so git will warn me every time I forget to add the prefix?

3 Answers 3

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To make sure every commit message follows some standard form, you can use the commit-msg hook.

But if you want to edit the commit message of some commit that is not the most recent, you can do that too using git rebase -i, assuming you didn't push it yet.

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  • Are the hooks working every time, no matter where I call them IDE or some GUI tool?
    – evgeniuz
    Apr 23, 2012 at 12:28
  • I think they should, but I didn't try it.
    – svick
    Apr 23, 2012 at 12:31
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You can use filter-branch in combo with --msg-filter to update a range of commits.

For example, If you want to prepend ticket:N to every commit message from HEAD to xxxxxx:

git filter-branch -f --msg-filter 'printf "ticket:N " && cat' xxxxxx..HEAD

You can also append to the commit message by simply reversing printf and cat:

git filter-branch -f --msg-filter 'cat && printf "ticket:N"' xxxxxx..HEAD

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    A slight problem with this approach is that it'll add a newline between the prefix and the rest of the message. You can avoid this by using 'printf "ticket:N " && cat' as the filter instead. (echo -n isn't very portable and is only available in some shells).
    – AlexT
    Dec 4, 2016 at 16:02
  • This answer saved me! My specific problem was adding JIRA ticket numbers. This answer is the basis for the solution tjdane.medium.com/…
    – TomDane
    Nov 24, 2020 at 23:50
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If you specifically want to add JIRA ticket numbers to your commits you can use this method https://tjdane.medium.com/add-a-jira-ticket-to-a-batch-of-old-commits-67557fb42d3e

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