62

This question already has an answer here:

What I'm trying to do is setting the value of the property in a class using a string. For example, my class has the following properties:

myClass.Name
myClass.Address
myClass.PhoneNumber
myClass.FaxNumber

All the fields are string type so I know ahead of time that it's always a string. Now I want to be able to set the properties using a string as you could do with DataSet object. Something like this:

myClass["Name"] = "John"
myClass["Address"] = "1112 River St., Boulder, CO"

Ideally I want to just assign a variable and then set the property using that string name from the variable

string propName = "Name"
myClass[propName] = "John"

I was reading about reflection and maybe it's the way to do it but I'm not sure how to go about setting that up while keeping the property access intact in the class. I want to still be able to use

myClass.Name = "John"

Any code examples would be really great.

marked as duplicate by Bhargav Rao Feb 23 at 16:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Look at that too: stackoverflow.com/questions/279374/… – MarcinJuraszek Apr 23 '12 at 15:13
  • Remember that reflection is slow. If performance matters, it's not recommended. – Konrad Morawski Apr 23 '12 at 15:17
  • Why do you want to do this? C# is statically typed. Why do you need it to behave like a dynamic language? – Konrad Morawski Apr 23 '12 at 15:22
  • I'm trying to do this because I'm getting the data dump from the data base and I'm only selectively wanting to pick out the fields I need to store in my class. Basically I don't want to do a check for each item and store in the class. I need to loop through all the fields and only pick out and add the item to the class dynamically. – Patratacus Apr 23 '12 at 16:04
  • I've never understood why people always want to remind you that reflection is slow and then suggest that you don't use it. Cache the results and I dare you to write a class large\or complicated enough to slow you down. The suggestion SHOULD always be more like, "Reflection is slow so make sure that you cache your results using a lazy loading mechanism", IMHO. – krowe2 Oct 25 '18 at 22:25
84

You can add indexer property, a pseudocode:

public class MyClass 
{
     public object this[string propertyName] 
     {
        get{
           // probably faster without reflection:
           // like:  return Properties.Settings.Default.PropertyValues[propertyName] 
           // instead of the following
           Type myType = typeof(MyClass);                   
           PropertyInfo myPropInfo = myType.GetProperty(propertyName);
           return myPropInfo.GetValue(this, null);
        }
        set{
           Type myType = typeof(MyClass);                   
           PropertyInfo myPropInfo = myType.GetProperty(propertyName);
           myPropInfo.SetValue(this, value, null);

        }

     }
}
  • 1
    I think you should remove " in GetProperty("propertyName") and you should use SetValue on set part – Marco Apr 23 '12 at 15:16
  • @Marco: just done :) – Tigran Apr 23 '12 at 15:17
  • 1
    Shouldn't the line return myPropInfo.Value; be return myPropInfo.GetValue(this, null)? – Giles Roberts Jul 10 '13 at 7:38
  • 1
    @GilesRoberts: correct, changing – Tigran Jul 10 '13 at 7:53
  • 1
    Thanks. This is no longer pseudo code now. It actually works! – Giles Roberts Jul 11 '13 at 10:04
2

You can add an indexer to your class and use reflection to aces the properties:

using System.Reflection;

public class MyClass {

    public object this[string name]
    {
        get
        {
            var properties = typeof(MyClass)
                    .GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);

            foreach (var property in properties)
            {
                if (property.Name == name && property.CanRead)
                    return property.GetValue(this, null);
            }

            throw new ArgumentException("Can't find property");

        }
        set {
            return;
        }
    }
}
-1

May be something like this?

    public class PropertyExample
{
    private readonly Dictionary<string, string> _properties;

    public string FirstName
    {
        get { return _properties["FirstName"]; }
        set { _properties["FirstName"] = value; }
    }

    public string LastName
    {
        get { return _properties["LastName"]; }
        set { _properties["LastName"] = value; }
    }
    public string this[string propertyName]
    {
        get { return _properties[propertyName]; }
        set { _properties[propertyName] = value; }
    }

    public PropertyExample()
    {
        _properties = new Dictionary<string, string>();
    }
}
  • You'd also have to populate the dictionary in the constructor to make it work. – Konrad Morawski Apr 23 '12 at 15:20
  • Yes, it's just a proposition for further implementation – Deitro Apr 23 '12 at 15:25
  • Then what if the actual property values are of different types ?? – Arun Aravind Oct 18 '13 at 11:13

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