101

I want to order methods in a Python class but I don't know what is the correct order.

When I extract methods in Eclipse with PyDev, Eclipse puts the extracted method on top of the modified method. But this puts the lower level details before the higher level details. According to Uncle Bob I should do the opposite so that my code reads like the headlines of a newspaper. When I program Java I just follow his advice.

What is the best practice for Python?

4
  • 8
    There isn't a best practice. Do what makes the most sense - important stuff near the top is a good idea, and consistency is generally a good thing. PEP-8 doesn't mention this, and if it were to be set in stone, that's where it would be. Apr 23 '12 at 23:04
  • 4
    And even PEP8 isn't always set in stone. Apr 23 '12 at 23:06
  • 1
    I usually do it by group on the functionality (get, set, etc)
    – CppLearner
    Apr 23 '12 at 23:11
  • 1
    It's important to note that the order of method functions can be arbitrary, because a class declaration is only defining its method functions, not invoking them. This allows the class method routines' source code to successfully use method functions that will be defined later on down in the listing.
    – DragonLord
    Jun 17 '20 at 19:17
83

As others have pointed out, there is no right way to order your methods. Maybe a PEP suggestion would be useful, but anyway. Let me try to approach your question as objectively as possible.

  • Interfaces first: Public methods and Python magic functions define the interface of the class. Most of the time, you and other developers want to use a class rather than change it. Thus they will be interested in the interface of that class. Putting it first in the source code avoids scrolling through implementation details you don't care about.

  • Properties, magic methods, public methods: It's hard to define the best order between those three, which are all part of the interface of the class. As @EthanFurman says, it's most important to stick with one system for the whole project. Generally, people expect __init__() to the best first function in the class so I follow up with the other magic methods right below.

  • Reading order: Basically, there are two ways to tell a story: Bottom-up or top-down. By putting high-level functions first, a developer can get a rough understanding of the class by reading the first couple of lines. Otherwise, one would have to read the whole class in order to get any understanding of the class and most developers don't have the time for that. As a rule of thumb, put methods above all methods called from their body.

  • Class methods and static methods: Usually, this is implied by the reading order explained above. Normal methods can call all methods times and thus come first. Class methods can only call class methods and static methods and come next. Static methods cannot call other methods of the class and come last.

Hope this helps. Most of these rules are not Python-specific by the way. I'm not aware of a language that enforces method order but if so, it would be quite interesting and please comment.

2
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    Usually a language does not enforce ordering. But some languages have common conventions. E.g. C# StyleCop has a strict ordering rules. For Java see stackoverflow.com/questions/4668218, etc.
    – xmedeko
    May 4 '17 at 14:13
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    class methods: these are often used as constructors and then they do typically call __init__ explicitly (in combination with __new__) or implicitly (through the default constructor), so that would be a reason to place them together with __init__. (Although I've never seen them placed before __init__.)
    – oulenz
    Jul 16 '19 at 13:05
16

There is no one correct order. Pick a system and stick with it. The one I use is:

class SomeClass(object):
    def __magic_methods__(self):
        "magic methods first, usually in alphabetical order"
    def _private_method(self):
        "worker methods next, also in alpha order"
    def a_method(self):
        "then normal methods, also in alpha order"
3
  • 2
    What's your preference for staticmethods, class variables, and @property decorated methods?
    – John Mee
    Sep 13 '12 at 4:56
  • @JohnMee: class variables I put before anything else; my folding method hides the @staticmethod, @classmethod, @property, and any other @decorator lines so I use the type of the method to determine where it goes (with the exception that properties tend to go between _private_methods and normal_methods). Sep 13 '12 at 16:22
  • So if the order basically goes from very private "magic" methods to private to normal methods, does that mean @classmethods come next (@classmethod def a_class_method(cls)) then @staticmethods (@staticmethod def a_static_method())? At least that's the policy as I understand it... (without my IDE folding anything because I don't like that)
    – Kawu
    Jul 23 '14 at 8:19
3

I do something similar to @Ethan that I saw in Django's source, where the main difference is big "############" block comments to delimit the areas. For example,

class SomeClass(object):
    #################
    # Magic Methods #
    #################
    def __magic_methods__(self):
        "magic methods first"

    ##################
    # Public Methods #
    ##################
    def a_method(self):
        "then normal methods, in order of importance"

    ###################
    # Private Methods #
    ###################
    def _private_method(self):
        "then worker methods, grouped by importance or related function"

Obviously this is less useful for smaller classes.

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    But I can see that they're magic, public or private. I actively dislike such blocks of comments, myself; I can look at the code folded if I want to see a list of them all. Having a comment above a particular block of functionality-related methods is something I'd do, but for this type of comment--that's what the method names tell me. Apr 23 '12 at 23:38
  • Again, I only do this for larger classes. I find it's easy to confuse magic methods with semi-private () and name-mangled (_) methods. Apr 24 '12 at 15:03
  • I was mid-edit removing the ugly #### blocks when I realized you'd put them there on purpose! I do agree with the order, though, which is what this question is about. I'd recommend removing the #### from this example since it doesn't pertain to the scope of the question and your example is of a small class, for which you wouldn't use #### anyways. :-) Apr 8 '18 at 7:04
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    @MateenUlhaq please refer to the second and fifth guidelines displayed on the editing screen: "clarify meaning without changing it" and "always respect the original author". (Note that these are meant to be applied unconditionally, with no respect to the editor's own opinion.) The whole and only point of this answer was to display those ugly comment blocks; without them, it says the exact same thing as Ethan's answer and there is no point for it to be here. You even did acknowledge that the blocks were there "on purpose" -- knowing this, why would you go and remove them?
    – hallo
    Apr 9 '18 at 0:52
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    @M.I.Wright I thought it outside the scope of the question. As you can see, rev2 still contains material that answers the question differently from Ethan's, with a different ordering (and subordering!). Nevertheless, rolled back. Apr 9 '18 at 0:58
0

The following code:

class Foo(_Foo):
    pass

class _Foo:
    pass

raises an exception since the class _Foo has to be defined before it is used. That's why it makes sense to generally define private classes before the public ones. That's why it makes sense to keep the consistency and to define also private methods and functions before the public ones.

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