3

I have a string of fourteen values seperated by #

0.1#5.338747#0.0#.... and so on

I want to convert each value from a string to a float or double to 3 decimal places. I can do most of this the long way...

str = "0.1#0.2#0.3#0.4";
String[] results;
results = str.split("#");
float res1 = new Float(results[0]);

but I'm not sure of the best way to get each float to 3 decimal places. I'd also prefer to do this in something neat like a for loop, but can't figure it out.

5 Answers 5

4

With rounding to 3 decimals...

    String[] parts = input.split("#");
    float[] numbers = new float[parts.length];
    for (int i = 0; i < parts.length; ++i) {
        float number = Float.parseFloat(parts[i]);
        float rounded = (int) Math.round(number * 1000) / 1000f;
        numbers[i] = rounded;
    }
0
2

Hope this helps...

String input = "0.1#5.338747#0.0";
String[] splittedValues = input.split("#");
List<Float> convertedValues = new ArrayList<Float>();
for (String value : splittedValues) {
    convertedValues.add(new BigDecimal(value).setScale(3, BigDecimal.ROUND_CEILING).floatValue());
}
2

You can do it with guava:

final String str = "0.1#0.2#0.3#0.4";
final Iterable<Float> floats = Iterables.transform(Splitter.on("#").split(str), new Function<String, Float>() {
  public Float apply(final String src) {
    return Float.valueOf(src);
  }
});

or with the Java API:

final String str = "0.1#0.2#0.3#0.4";
final StringTokenizer strTokenizer = new StringTokenizer(str, "#");

final List<Float> floats = new ArrayList<Float>();
while (strTokenizer.hasMoreTokens()) {
    floats.add(Float.valueOf(strTokenizer.nextToken()));
}
3
  • Nice. You're missing the 3 decimals, though
    – Lukas Eder
    Apr 24, 2012 at 9:42
  • Yes, I'm, because it's a floating point number it won't be cut to 3 decimals anyway. Apr 24, 2012 at 9:43
  • Not exactly, yes. But 5.3390003 might be better from the OP's point of view, than 5.338747. The rounding still has some effect...
    – Lukas Eder
    Apr 24, 2012 at 9:45
2
String str = "0.1#0.2#0.3#0.4";
String[] results = str.split("#");
float fResult[] = new float[results.length()];
for(int i = 0; i < results.length(); i++) {
    fResult[i] = Float.parseFloat(String.format("%.3f",results[i]));
}
1
  • String.format uses the HALF_EVEN rounding mode, docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/math/RoundingMode.html which may or may not be what you want. Also, you have to be wary of Locales - parseFloat assumes a standard notation (e.g. 1.23) whereas String.format uses the Locale and may output something like 1,23 which will cause parseFloat to throw a NumberFormatException.
    – claesv
    Apr 24, 2012 at 12:00
1

On the account of getting 3 decimal places, try this:

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String str = "0.12345#0.2#0.3#0.4";
        String[] results;
        results = str.split("#");
        float res1 = new Float(results[0]);
        System.out.println("res = " + res1);
        // cut to right accuracy
        res1 = ((int) (res1 * 1000)) / 1000f;
        System.out.println("res = " + res1);
    }
}

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