18

Check out this simple example on jsfiddle

<div id ="a" data-siteid="00005">00005 turns into:</div>
<div id="b" data-siteid="S00005">S00005 turns into: </div>

code

$('#a').append($('#a').data("siteid"));
$('#b').append($('#b').data("siteid"));

​ result

00005 turns into:5
S00005 turns into: S00005

I would like to return "00005" and "S00005".

  • Sorry @FelixKling, it's a string, but not the string I needed. My siteid is actual the string '00005' – Larsi Apr 24 '12 at 11:35
  • Yeah... I understood your question, deleted my comment. A bit more explanation would have helper though ;) For example, that S00005 is used to force returning a string and that this should show that 00005 is converted to a number. – Felix Kling Apr 24 '12 at 11:35
29

Try

$('#a').append($('#a').attr('data-siteid'));
$('#b').append($('#b').attr('data-siteid'));

From the jQuery Docs

Every attempt is made to convert the string to a JavaScript value (this includes booleans, numbers, objects, arrays, and null) otherwise it is left as a string. To retrieve the value's attribute as a string without any attempt to convert it, use the attr() method.

  • Thanks a lot for also providing the doc! – Larsi Apr 24 '12 at 11:37
  • The docs clearly say that attr() returns a string but simple code like element.attr('data-text', '12'); text = element.attr('data-text'); returns a number for me. What am I doing wrong? – jlh Sep 25 '17 at 6:33
3

Every attempt is made to convert the string to a JavaScript value (this includes booleans, numbers, objects, arrays, and null) otherwise it is left as a string. To retrieve the value's attribute as a string without any attempt to convert it, use the attr() method.

From here: http://api.jquery.com/data/#data-html5

  • 2
    I think @binarious was faster :) – ant7 Apr 24 '12 at 11:49
  • ok, thanks anyway – Larsi Apr 24 '12 at 12:32
1

I know this is a slightly older post, but another way you can approach this is to convert the data attribute value to a string:

$('#a').data("siteid").toString()

or

$('#a').data().siteid.toString()

Some examples of how this can work:

> (12345).toString()
"12345"

> (14.5).toString()
"14.5"

> (-14.5).toString()
"-14.5"

> "bob".toString()
"bob"

> (true).toString()
"true"

> ({a: "b"}).toString()
"[object Object]"

>(function(){console.log("bob")}).toString()
"function (){console.log("bob")}"

The parenthesis in the example are there to avoid assigning variables, since you cannot directly use #toString on the number directly: 123.toString(), but you can when it assigned to a variable or enclosed in parenthesis: (123).toString().

Just remember that you won't be able to convert null or undefined to a string.

Also something interesting happens with arrays and undefined and null values:

> (["bob", 123, true, null, undefined, this]).toString()
"bob,123,true,,,[object Window]"

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