10

I'm searching for an efficient way to check if two numbers have the same sign.

Basically I'm searching for a more elegant way than this:

var n1 = 1;
var n2 = -1;

( (n1 > 0 && n2 > 0) || (n1<0 && n2 < 0) )? console.log("equal sign"):console.log("different sign");

A solution with bitwise operators would be fine too.

  • 1
    It's not JavaScript, but I guess all of these work as well: Simplest way to check if two integers have same sign?. – Felix Kling Apr 24 '12 at 12:52
  • @FelixKling Yeah, i read this question but stopped at the accepted answer, which i wasn't satisfied with;) – Christoph Apr 24 '12 at 12:55
  • 3
    Well, the next answer is pretty cool imo: return ((x<0) ==(y<0));. – Felix Kling Apr 24 '12 at 12:57
  • @FelixKling thats true, another case for "Don't stop reading after accepted answer" – Christoph Apr 24 '12 at 12:59
16

Fewer characters of code, but might overflow:

n1*n2 > 0 ? console.log("equal sign") : console.log("different sign or zero");

or without integer overflow, but slightly larger:

(n1>0) == (n2>0) ? console.log("equal sign") : console.log("different sign");

if you consider 0 as positive the > should be replaced with <

  • 2
    What if n1 and n2 are both positive integers but multiplying them causes an integer overlow? – Thorsten Dittmar Apr 24 '12 at 12:52
  • 1
    Than the first version fails. So i added a more robust but slightly larger version. – user1346466 Apr 24 '12 at 12:57
  • by using this expression, you need assume that both n1 and n2 are number type and not NaN. – tsh May 31 '17 at 5:33
  • Overflow does not matter. (Infinity just works fine.) But underflow does. – tsh Jun 29 '18 at 6:49
40

You can multiply them together; if they have the same sign, the result will be positive.

bool sameSign = (n1 * n2) > 0
  • 19
    What if n1 and n2 are both positive integers but multiplying them causes an integer overlow? – Thorsten Dittmar Apr 24 '12 at 12:51
  • @ThorstenDittmar I was worried someone would point that out ;) -- in that case, stackoverflow.com/questions/66882/… – Jason Hall Apr 24 '12 at 12:53
  • @ThorstenDittmar this problem won't occur in my case, but nevertheless worth pointing this out. – Christoph Apr 24 '12 at 12:57
  • 3
    What if n1 and n2 are both zero? – Matthew Crumley Apr 24 '12 at 13:06
  • 1
    @ThorstenDittmar JavaScript will never cause integer overflow on Number type, since they are not "integers" at all. They are float, IEEE 754 float. – tsh May 31 '17 at 5:39
6

Use bitwise xor

n1^n2 >= 0 ? console.log("equal sign") : console.log("different sign");
  • 2
    testing for < 0 will make it one char smaller ;) – user1346466 Apr 24 '12 at 14:45
5

That based on how you define "same sign" for special values:

  • does NaN, NaN have the same sign?

If your answer is "No", the answer is:

Math.sign(a) === Math.sign(b)

If your answer is "Yes", the answer is:

Object.is(Math.sign(a) + 0, Math.sign(b) + 0)
  • Unfortunately, the correct answer would be "Yes" and "Yes", and thus this approach is not particularly useful (besides the fact, that it is not really practical to invoke the Math object for such a trivial task). – Christoph Jun 1 '17 at 14:28
  • @Christoph YY and NN had been added to the answer. – tsh Jun 2 '17 at 1:18
  • @Christoph I cannot understand why you do not want use methods in ES Spec. You do not need add dependency to any third party cods, and they should work better than most codes other people wrote. You may say this task is "trivial", but I did not find other answers handle these edge cases correctly. You may say "it is not my business for my specified question", but that should not be a "correct" answer to this question. – tsh Jun 2 '17 at 1:21
  • I removed the +-0 part, since the spec clearly states, how to treat this case. I think you misunderstood my comment - I know that this is a native object, I just think, that it's "overkill" to use it, if there are simpler solutions (besides the fact, that I was looking for a short solution). Nonetheless, I gave you an upvote for your "outside-the-box" solution. – Christoph Jun 2 '17 at 14:22
1
n = n1*n2;
if(n>0){ same sign }
else { different sign }
  • 1
    What if n1 and n2 are both positive integers but multiplying them causes an integer overlow? – Thorsten Dittmar Apr 24 '12 at 12:53
  • agreed. that might be a problem. – sgowd Apr 24 '12 at 12:56
-1

Simple easy:

bool sameSign = ((n1 < 0) == (n2 < 0)); 
  • Instead of adding a new answer (to a 4 year old, answered question) why not just give the person who gave the exact same answer an upvote? – Christoph Jan 3 '17 at 19:29
  • Tnx 4 ur comment. Despite of similar concept, I don't think if they are exactly the same, so I posted mine for any future reference to this question. By the way thanks for your good question. I upvoted in advance – Pmpr Jan 3 '17 at 19:37
  • 1
    This isn’t even JavaScript… – Sebastian Simon Aug 10 '18 at 15:58
-4

Maybe a regex should do the trick

function isNegative(num) { 
        if (num.match(/^-\d+$/)) {
            return true;
        } else {
            return false;
        }
   }


function isSameSign(num1, num2) { 
        var sameSign = false;  
        if (num1.match(/^-\d+$/) && num2.match(/^-\d+$/) ) {
                sameSign = true;
            } else if(!num2.match(/^-\d+$/) && !num2.match(/^-\d+$/)) {
                sameSign =true;
            }
        return sameSign;
       }
  • This only returns whether one number is false. If you want to do that, you can just check num > 0 -- to convert a string to a number first you can do parseInt(num) > 0 – Jason Hall Apr 24 '12 at 13:31
  • Well it just requires a tweak. I have updated and given a second version to show, how the first function can be modified to achieve the requirement – Sandeep Nair Apr 24 '12 at 13:38
  • But you're still using a fragile regex instead of the built-in parseInt method. – Jason Hall Apr 24 '12 at 14:38
  • Even return num1<0 && num2<0 || num1>=0 && num2>=0; better and shorter – vp_arth May 30 '16 at 10:05

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