51

Dates in my database are stored as Utc. But when I retreieve them w/ the entity framework they come out as type unspecified.

When JSON.Net serializes them they are not in Utc format. Is there a way to tell JSON.Net to serialize DateTimes as Utc even if their type is not specified as Utc?

  • 4
    I'd suggest you do a DateTime.SpecifyKind() in your data layer so it returns correct dates. Either than or use DateTimeOffset instead. Unspecified kind coming out of your database is a common issue and it can cause lots of other problems when your system's timezone isn't UTC. – dezfowler Apr 24 '12 at 17:32
  • 1
    I agree with you. I just don't know of a clean way to specify the kind using EF code first. – C.J. Apr 24 '12 at 17:52
102

Set DateTimeZoneHandling on JsonSerializerSettings to Utc. That will convert all dates to UTC before serializing them.

public void SerializeObjectDateTimeZoneHandling()
{
  string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(
    new DateTime(2000, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, DateTimeKind.Unspecified),
    new JsonSerializerSettings
    {
      DateTimeZoneHandling = DateTimeZoneHandling.Utc
    });

  Assert.AreEqual(@"""2000-01-01T01:01:01Z""", json);
}

Documentation: DateTimeZoneHandling setting

  • 11
    You are hero. Seems like you are familiar with Json.net! LOL – Youngjae Jul 24 '14 at 2:54
  • 1
    is there a way to do with an attribute or globally (in a website, not api) – Brad Dec 30 '14 at 19:28
  • 4
    For me, this actually made no difference. My DateTimes has Kind=="Unspecified" but they actually are local. Whether I have this DateTimeZoneHandling or not it does the same thing - assumes UTC. Which, I guess, makes sense but I when I saw this answer, I thought it would convert my local times to UTC. Note that myDateTime.ToUniversalTime() converts it from local to UTC. – Curtis Yallop Jun 9 '15 at 0:00
  • 1
    This should be the default. Deserializing to a time-zone-less DateTime with an inferred local timezone offset is extrememly tricky behaviour. – bbsimonbb Jul 28 '16 at 15:26
  • 2
    Yes, but assuming a time-zone-less DateTime is UTC by default is madness. – Darragh Jun 27 '17 at 14:59
13

The response above totally works, and so I used that to create an attribute to convert an API response from PST to UTC.

First I needed to create a JsonConverter

public class UTCDateTimeConverter : Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConverter {
    private TimeZoneInfo pacificZone = TimeZoneInfo.FindSystemTimeZoneById("Pacific Standard Time");
    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType) {
        return objectType == typeof(DateTime);
    }

    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer) {
        if (reader.Value == null) return null;
        var pacificTime = DateTime.Parse(reader.Value.ToString());
        return TimeZoneInfo.ConvertTimeToUtc(pacificTime, pacificZone);
    }

    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer) {
        writer.WriteValue(TimeZoneInfo.ConvertTimeFromUtc((DateTime) value, pacificZone));
    }
}

Then I had to apply that to the properties that needed to be converted

public class Order{
    [JsonConverter(typeof(UTCDateTimeConverter))]
    public DateTime OrderDate {get;set;}
}
1

As @dez mentioned in a comment, you can "mark" the DateTime objects as UTC directly in .net code right after LOADING them from DB and BEFORE serializing them:

var item = GetItemFromDb(...);

// mark appropriate DateTime fields manually as needed
item.OrderDate = DateTime.SpecifyKind(item.OrderDate, DateTimeKind.Utc);

// now it will be serialized to "2018-10-17T16:21:23.507Z" with the Z at the end
// and javascript will parse it properly and convert to local timezone as needed
0

To me, it was simpler to create the UTC converter for DateTime properties (based on the implementation of the Newtonsoft.Json.Converters.IsoDateTimeConverter).

public class UtcJsonDateTimeConverter : DateTimeConverterBase
{
    private const string DefaultDateTimeFormat = "yyyy'-'MM'-'dd'T'HH':'mm':'ss.FFFFFFFZ";

    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        string text;

        if (value is DateTime dateTime)
        {
            text = dateTime.ToString(DefaultDateTimeFormat, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
        }
        else
        {
            throw new JsonSerializationException(
                $"Unexpected value when converting date. Expected DateTime or DateTimeOffset, got {value.GetType()}.");
        }

        writer.WriteValue(text);
    }

    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        bool nullable = objectType == typeof(DateTime?);
        if (reader.TokenType == JsonToken.Null)
        {
            if (!nullable)
            {
                throw new JsonSerializationException($"Cannot convert null value to {objectType}.");
            }

            return null;
        }

        if (reader.TokenType == JsonToken.Date)
        {
            return reader.Value;
        }
        else if (reader.TokenType != JsonToken.String)
        {
            throw new JsonSerializationException($"Unexpected token parsing date. Expected String, got {reader.TokenType}.");
        }

        string date_text = reader.Value.ToString();

        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(date_text) && nullable)
        {
            return null;
        }

        return DateTime.Parse(date_text, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, DateTimeStyles.AssumeUniversal);
    }
}

public class SomeEntity
{

   [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "id", Order = 1)]
   public int ID { get; set; }

   [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "created", Order = 2)]
   [JsonConverter(typeof(UtcJsonDateTimeConverter))]
   public DateTime Created { get; set; }
}

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