12

I was thinking of a class like:

template < typename ...Whatever >
class MyClass
{
public:
    static constexpr bool has_default_ctr = Something;

    // I want this only if "has_default_ctr" is "true".
    MyClass();

    //...
};

I don't think I can use a constructor template and std::enable_if for this (because there's no arguments). Am I wrong? If not, is there some other way to do this?

3
  • Just a quick thought - did you try enable_if and a constructor with an argument with a default value? Apr 25, 2012 at 5:03
  • 2
    Could you elaborate why you want to do this? Apr 25, 2012 at 5:07
  • Ok, I honestly thought this was not possible, I stand corrected and deleted my answer. Isn't this a huge anti pattern though? Apr 25, 2012 at 17:42

8 Answers 8

17

C++11 allows to (reliably) use enable_if-style SFINAE in template arguments:

template<
    // This is needed to make the condition dependent
    bool B = has_default_ctr
    , typename std::enable_if<B, int>::type = 0
>
MyClass();

// When outside of class scope:
// have to repeat the condition for out-of-line definition
template<bool B, typename std::enable_if<B, int>::type = 0>
MyClass::MyClass()
/* define here */

In C++03 you could have used a unary constructor with a defaulted parameter -- the default parameter means that the constructor still counts as a default constructor.

6
  • My god man this trick is so useful to me. I was aware of std::enable_if but never though of using it that way Mar 25, 2014 at 22:52
  • I think this results in a compile-time error. Unless I am missing something, doesn't typename std::enable_if<B, int>::type = 0 resolve to void = 0 when B = true? class C = typename std::enable_if<B, int>::type would work. Apr 26, 2014 at 12:59
  • @LucDanton Ah sorry, I completely missed the int argument that you added to enable_if. Apr 27, 2014 at 1:40
  • This doesn't work in standards compliant compilers because SFINAE does not apply in this context, since the condition isn't dependent on the template arguments of the default constructor. If you use this trick, you'll get a compiler error any time you try to instantiate MyClass when has_default_ctr is false, regardless of whether the MyClass default constructor is instantiated.
    – rmcclellan
    Mar 10, 2016 at 18:39
  • @rmcclellan The condition is dependent and everything works as expected
    – Luc Danton
    Mar 11, 2016 at 3:16
4

Since the solution with a default parameter is mentioned in the comments, but I needed quite some time to figure out how to do it (made my Enabler class private, which does not work), here the suggested solution, in case anybody is looking for it:

class MyClass {
public:
   // if constructor is supposed to be public,
   // this helper class must be public as well!
   struct Enabler {}; 

   template <class U = Enabler>
   MyClass (std::enable_if_t<has_default_ctr, U> = Enabler {})
   {
      // whatever
   }
};
1

To get different definitions for a class depending on some condition, put the dependency calculation in a template argument.

// primary template, no default constructor unless Something is true
template< typename T, bool has_default_ctr = Something > class MyClass {
    // as you had it, with no default constructor
};

// you want MyClass<T,true> to be just like MyClass<T,false>
// but with a default constructor:
template< typename T > class MyClass<T,true> : public MyClass<T,false> {

    MyClass() : MyClass<T,false>(/* chosen constructor args */) { etc; }

    using MyClass<T,false>::MyClass<T,false>;
};

if you don't have C++11 you can't use the using constructor inheritance and you'll have to redeclare all its constructors and forward their arguments along to the base class.

This is fingers-to-keyboard, I don't have a compiler handy atm so minor syntax goofs are somewhat likely.

2
  • @jhill Cannot make this compile in VS11. I have no support for constexpr.
    – Ghita
    Apr 25, 2012 at 9:31
  • This does not compile: template <typename T, bool has_default_ctr> class MyClass { }; template <typename T, true> class MyClass: public MyClass<T, false> { MyClass() {} };
    – Ghita
    Apr 25, 2012 at 10:15
0

You could do something as simple as

template < typename ...Whatever >
class MyClass
{
public:
    static constexpr bool has_default_ctr = Something;

    // I want this only if "has_default_ctr" is "true".
    MyClass()
    {
        static_assert(has_default_ctr, "Not Default Constructible");
    }

    //...
};
0

Here's the one I recently used. I needed a class template with a default constructor if its data members support a default constructor, otherwise the default constructor should not compile.

The class template defines a template type parameter, and the class defines a data member of such a type (a variant using inheritance might also be attractive, as it can use the empty baseclass optimization). The data member's default constructor is automatically called by the class's default constructor. If the data member's type doesn't have a default constructor, compilation fails. Otherwise it succeeds. Here is the code:

#include <string>
template <typename Data>
class Demo
{
    Data d_data;

    public:
        Demo() = default;        // OK when used and Data has a default
                                 // constructor. 

        Demo(Data const &data)   // Exampe of an additional constructor
        :
            d_data(data)
        {}

        // ...
};

struct WithoutDefault
{
    WithoutDefault(int)
    {}
};

int main()
{
    Demo<std::string> withString;
    // Demo<NoDefault> nope;              // won't compile

    WithoutDefault nod(10);
    Demo<WithoutDefault> nodefault(nod);  // OK
}
0

With enable_if it's easy (it works if the class templated also):

#include <type_traits>

class MyClass
{
public:
    static constexpr bool has_default_ctr = Something;

    // I want this only if "has_default_ctr" is "true".
    template <typename = std::enable_if<has_default_ctr>::type>
    MyClass();

    //...
};
0

Possible answer not exactly for this question . But if you want to enable default constructor for template class only when its template-parameter-type field has default constructor. Then you can just create explicitly defaulted constructor in template class. See example:

struct HasDefault
{
    HasDefault() = default;
    HasDefault(int) {}
};

struct NoDefault
{
    NoDefault() = delete;
    NoDefault(int) {}
};

template <typename ValueT>
struct Wrapper
{
    Wrapper() = default;
    Wrapper(ValueT &&value) : value(std::forward<ValueT>(value)) {}

    ValueT value;
};

int main()
{
    Wrapper<HasDefault> hasDefault;
    Wrapper<HasDefault> hasDefault2(1);
    //Wrapper<NoDefault> noDefault; error: use of deleted function 'Wrapper<ValueT>::Wrapper()
    Wrapper<NoDefault> noDefault2(1);
}
-1

you can use diferent constructors with differents arguments

MyClass(){

}
MyClass(int num){

}
MyClass(String s){
}

and the you can simple write and static function that return the class and writes the conditions inside:

static chooseContructor(/*parameters*/){
 if(/*something*/){
     return new MyCLass();
 }
 else if(/*something else*/){
     return new MyClass(int num);
 }
 else if{
    return new MyClass(String s);
 }
}

And so on... Something like that will give you a semi-automatic constructor chooser

1
  • Tho it fails if MyClass has members that are not default constructible. Apr 25, 2012 at 6:05

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.