103

Table:

id     userid  friendid   name    status
1      1        2         venkat  false
2      1        3         sai     true
3      1        4         arun    false
4      1        5         arjun   false

If a user sends userid=1,friendids=2,4,5 status=true

How would I write the query to update the above? All friendids status is true. [2,3,4 at a time]?

3 Answers 3

255

To update one column here are some syntax options:

Option 1

var ls=new int[]{2,3,4};
using (var db=new SomeDatabaseContext())
{
    var some= db.SomeTable.Where(x=>ls.Contains(x.friendid)).ToList();
    some.ForEach(a=>a.status=true);
    db.SubmitChanges();
}

Option 2

using (var db=new SomeDatabaseContext())
{
     db.SomeTable
       .Where(x=>ls.Contains(x.friendid))
       .ToList()
       .ForEach(a=>a.status=true);

     db.SubmitChanges();
}

Option 3

using (var db=new SomeDatabaseContext())
{
    foreach (var some in db.SomeTable.Where(x=>ls.Contains(x.friendid)).ToList())
    {
        some.status=true;
    }
    db.SubmitChanges();
}

Update

As requested in the comment it might make sense to show how to update multiple columns. So let's say for the purpose of this exercise that we want not just to update the status at ones. We want to update name and status where the friendid is matching. Here are some syntax options for that:

Option 1

var ls=new int[]{2,3,4};
var name="Foo";
using (var db=new SomeDatabaseContext())
{
    var some= db.SomeTable.Where(x=>ls.Contains(x.friendid)).ToList();
    some.ForEach(a=>
                    {
                        a.status=true;
                        a.name=name;
                    }
                );
    db.SubmitChanges();
}

Option 2

using (var db=new SomeDatabaseContext())
{
    db.SomeTable
        .Where(x=>ls.Contains(x.friendid))
        .ToList()
        .ForEach(a=>
                    {
                        a.status=true;
                        a.name=name;
                    }
                );
    db.SubmitChanges();
}

Option 3

using (var db=new SomeDatabaseContext())
{
    foreach (var some in db.SomeTable.Where(x=>ls.Contains(x.friendid)).ToList())
    {
        some.status=true;
        some.name=name;
    }
    db.SubmitChanges();
}

Update 2

In the answer I was using LINQ to SQL and in that case to commit to the database the usage is:

db.SubmitChanges();

But for Entity Framework to commit the changes it is:

db.SaveChanges()
16
  • 6
    And for multiple comments you need to do: records.ForEach(x=> { x.Deleted = true; x.DeletedByUserID = deletedByUserId; x.DeletedOn = DateTime.Now; });
    – JonH
    Sep 12, 2014 at 11:35
  • 2
    Shouldn't it be db.SaveChanges() and not db.SubmitChanges()?
    – bradlis7
    Dec 2, 2014 at 15:54
  • 3
    ...All three of your options are the same. In fact the only difference between the first two is that one uses a variable and one doesn't. Having both is just increased noise. Apr 4, 2015 at 3:44
  • 2
    Note: This will generate a separate SQL Update Query per Row. In this case it's not, but if the # Rows are "significant" (i.e. mil's, k's even 100's), you may want to use a single SQL Update Query via embedded SQL or Stored Proc instead. Source: "social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/…"
    – Tom
    Jul 8, 2016 at 19:51
  • 3
    is it possible to do without ToList()? It's a killer
    – Toolkit
    Jan 13, 2017 at 16:27
26

Do not use the ToList() method as in the accepted answer !

Running SQL profiler, I verified and found that ToList() function gets all the records from the database. It is really bad performance !!

I would have run this query by pure sql command as follows:

string query = "Update YourTable Set ... Where ...";    
context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommandAsync(query, new SqlParameter("@ColumnY", value1), new SqlParameter("@ColumnZ", value2));

This would operate the update in one-shot without selecting even one row.

1
  • 1
    While I agree with you, the question does specifically ask for linq way. And, you don't actually need to use .ToList(). I do believe you can use a .ForEachAsync() method or foreach regular loop without .ToList(). Still probably not great performance wise. But, you shouldn't be using EF if you're that concerned with performance IMO.
    – Santiago
    Jan 28, 2021 at 21:26
4

This is what I did:

EF:

using (var context = new SomeDBContext())
{
    foreach (var item in model.ShopItems)  // ShopItems is a posted list with values 
    {    
        var feature = context.Shop
                             .Where(h => h.ShopID == 123 && h.Type == item.Type).ToList();

        feature.ForEach(a => a.SortOrder = item.SortOrder);
    }

    context.SaveChanges();
}

Hope helps someone.

Note: 5 years later, As said in comments its not good option because i am making DB calls to get some data inside foreach. If you are not doing the same then its ok to use.

6
  • Works like a charm! Jul 28, 2017 at 7:27
  • 5
    this is bad, you are calling database each time to fetch the record feature and also you should not add context.SaveChanges() inside foreach it should be outside foreach loop. Nov 3, 2017 at 9:43
  • 1
    The SQL is not the same as the EF code. In SQL it is just 1 command that runs on all rows and update the table. The EF code takes all rows first, updates the changed ones on DB, meaning that if you have 1000 updated rows, it will execute 1000 sql updates
    – Ashkan S
    Jan 15, 2018 at 11:24
  • 1
    @stom It is not still the same :) context.SaveChanges(); just submits your update. there will still be 1000 update commands each using the id and not the SortOrder condition
    – Ashkan S
    Mar 6, 2018 at 14:44
  • 2
    @stom ExecuteSqlCommand exists on EF for this purpose but on I agree it is not pretty :) Anyways, my point was that you've written a SQL command and a different EF-C# code and claiming that they are equal. :)
    – Ashkan S
    Mar 7, 2018 at 13:56

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