15

I would like to interweave two vectors in MATLAB. In fact, I'd actually just like to add a zero between each element, but I figured I'd ask the question in such a way that I'd learn how to apply this to other situations.

My specific application: I'd like to take a vector (e.g. [1 2 3]) and output [0 1 0 2 0 3].

The wider question: How would I do this with two different vectors, e.g. [1 2 3] and [9 8 7] interweaving to produce [9 1 8 2 7 3].

Any help greatly appreciated, in either or both of the above questions.

9

Here's some code that will accomplish what you want:

nums   = rand(1,3)
output = zeros(1,2*numel(nums));
output(2:2:end) = nums

The output is the following:

nums =

    0.9134    0.6324    0.0975


output =

         0    0.9134         0    0.6324         0    0.0975

Following the style of the other two answers, you could get your desired zeros output with the following:

nums = rand(1,3);
reshape([zeros(size(nums));nums],1,[])

Obviously, nums should be replaced with the vector you'd like to use. As mentioned, you should make sure it's a row vector before calling reshape.

  • 1
    To guarantee it's a row vector, you can write nums(:)' – Jonas Apr 25 '12 at 14:32
  • The reshape solution is very elegant! – Anael Mar 14 '17 at 6:17
29

I'd make use of the internal layout of MATLAB vectors: They are stored column-major, that is, values in a column change fastest. To interleave two vectors a and b, simply do:

ar = a(:).';    % make sure ar is a row vector
br = b(:).';    % make sure br is a row vector
A = [ar;br];   % concatenate them vertically
c = A(:);      % flatten the result
  • Trivial, but to make it return a row vector one can of course change the last line like so: c = A(:)'; – Dennis Jaheruddin Nov 19 '13 at 10:56
  • 4
    Use .' instead of ', otherwise it won't work with complex numbers. – Daniel Aug 22 '15 at 13:45
11

Try

reshape([[9 8 7];[1 2 3]],1,[])
  • I really like this solution, but looking at the documentation, I see no guarantee that this function will behave this way for all input, or for future implementations of the function. In particular, it seems only to guarantee that: "reshape(X,SIZ) returns an N-D array with the same elements as X but reshaped to the size SIZ." – Jacob Lee Mar 31 '15 at 20:46
  • @JacobLee: That use of reshape is safe to use. First argument is a matrix, following a 1 and a laceholder always reshapes to 1xn. – Daniel Aug 22 '15 at 13:44
  • A more general version working for row and column inputs would be reshape([A(:).';B(:).'],1,[]) – Daniel Aug 22 '15 at 13:44
4

I wrote a MATLAB function that's on the File Exchange site (Interleave Vectors or Matrices) that does exactly what you want and more. Just download the .m file and put the file in the same directory as your other .m files, or copy and paste the function into your program.

This function interleaves any number of vectors or matrices by row or column. If the input are just vectors, there is no need to specify orientation. Extra elements/rows/columns are appended on the end of the output matrix. The other answers provided are very specific for vectors of equal length or require making sure the orientation of vectors is correct.

Examples of how to use the function:

1) Interleaving rows of matrices

A = [1 2; 3 4] B = [5 6;7 8]

C = interleave2(A, B, 'row') 
C = [1 2 
     5 6 
     3 4 
     7 8]

2) Interleaving columns of matrices

C = interleave2(A, B, 'col') 
C = [1 5 2 6 
     3 7 4 8]

3) Interleaving vectors (Note: input vectors need not be same orientation)

A = [1 2 3 4] B = [5 6 7 8 9]' 
C = interleave2(A, B) 
C = [1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 9]'

4) Interleaving >2 matrices

A = [1 2;3 4] B = [5 6;7 8] 
C = [9 10;11 12] D = [13 14;15 16]

E = interleave2(A, B, C, D, 'col') 
E = [1 5 9 13 2 6 10 14 
     3 7 11 15 4 8 12 16]

5) Interleaving columns of 2 matrices with unequal columns

A = [1 2;3 4] 
B = [5 6 7 8;9 10 11 12] 
C = interleave2(A, B, 'col') 
C = [1 5 2 6 7 8 
     3 9 4 10 11 12] 

6) Interleaving >2 vectors of unequal lengths

A = [1 2 3 4] B = [5 6 7] 
C = [8 9 10 11 12 13] 
D = interleave2(A, B, C) 
D = [1 5 8 2 6 9 3 7 10 4 11 12 13]
4

For the most simple case there's a quite "elegant" solution with a one-liner as described in this answer to a similar question.

a = [9 8 7];
b = [1 2 3];
output = kron(a, [1 0]) + kron(b, [0 1]);

As stated in the answer be aware that this is less efficient however might serve for a more general purpose than just interleaving as it uses the Kronecker product that is well-defined between two matrices.

1

Octave is a free, open source reverse engineering of MatLab where the functionality and language are the same in most cases. However, if you find yourself coding in Octave, you can use the below to interleave two (real valued) row vectors x and y:

[x;y](:)'

Caveat: this is Octave code and doesn't work in MatLab.

  • Doesn't do complex numbers. Doesn't work if the vectors are different lengths. Doesn't check the inputs are row vectors. etc. However, if you're not worried about these cases and you need something that's efficient to write and to run, this is it. – Robino Sep 11 '18 at 15:10
  • 1
    Doesn't work in MATLAB. Is this Octave syntax? – gnovice Sep 11 '18 at 15:19
  • @gnovice Yes, I am coding in Octave. I was unaware the languages were that different! I will add the caveat that this only works in Octave. – Robino Sep 12 '18 at 15:36

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.