110

I'm a bit confused about how and when to use beginBackgroundTaskWithExpirationHandler.

Apple shows in their examples to use it in applicationDidEnterBackground delegate, to get more time to complete some important task, usually a network transaction.

When looking on my app, it seems like most of my network stuff is important, and when one is started I would like to complete it if the user pressed the home button.

So is it accepted/good practice to wrap every network transaction (and I'm not talking about downloading big chunk of data, it mostly some short xml) with beginBackgroundTaskWithExpirationHandler to be on the safe side?

2

5 Answers 5

170

If you want your network transaction to continue in the background, then you'll need to wrap it in a background task. It's also very important that you call endBackgroundTask when you're finished - otherwise the app will be killed after its allotted time has expired.

Mine tend look something like this:

- (void) doUpdate 
{
    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0), ^{

        [self beginBackgroundUpdateTask];

        NSURLResponse * response = nil;
        NSError  * error = nil;
        NSData * responseData = [NSURLConnection sendSynchronousRequest: request returningResponse: &response error: &error];

        // Do something with the result

        [self endBackgroundUpdateTask];
    });
}
- (void) beginBackgroundUpdateTask
{
    self.backgroundUpdateTask = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] beginBackgroundTaskWithExpirationHandler:^{
        [self endBackgroundUpdateTask];
    }];
}

- (void) endBackgroundUpdateTask
{
    [[UIApplication sharedApplication] endBackgroundTask: self.backgroundUpdateTask];
    self.backgroundUpdateTask = UIBackgroundTaskInvalid;
}

I have a UIBackgroundTaskIdentifier property for each background task


Equivalent code in Swift

func doUpdate () {

    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0), {

        let taskID = beginBackgroundUpdateTask()

        var response: URLResponse?, error: NSError?, request: NSURLRequest?

        let data = NSURLConnection.sendSynchronousRequest(request, returningResponse: &response, error: &error)

        // Do something with the result

        endBackgroundUpdateTask(taskID)

        })
}

func beginBackgroundUpdateTask() -> UIBackgroundTaskIdentifier {
    return UIApplication.shared.beginBackgroundTask(expirationHandler: ({}))
}

func endBackgroundUpdateTask(taskID: UIBackgroundTaskIdentifier) {
    UIApplication.shared.endBackgroundTask(taskID)
}
23
  • 1
    Yes, I do... otherwise they stop in when the app enters the background. Apr 25, 2012 at 16:27
  • 1
    do we need to do anything in applicationDidEnterBackground?
    – dips
    Aug 3, 2012 at 18:33
  • 1
    Only if you want to use that as a point to start the network operation. If you just want an existing operation to complete, as per @Eyal's question, you don't need to do anything in applicationDidEnterBackground Aug 3, 2012 at 20:03
  • 2
    Thanks for this clear example! (Just changed beingBackgroundUpdateTask to beginBackgroundUpdateTask.) Jan 4, 2013 at 14:46
  • 31
    If you call doUpdate multiple times in a row without the work is done, you will overwrite self.backgroundUpdateTask so previous tasks can't be ended properly. You should either store the task identifier each time so you end it properly or use a counter in the begin/end methods.
    – thejaz
    Oct 1, 2013 at 16:21
23

The accepted answer is very helpful and should be fine in most cases, however two things bothered me about it:

  1. As a number of people have noted, storing the task identifier as a property means that it can be overwritten if the method is called multiple times, leading to a task that will never be gracefully ended until forced to end by the OS at the time expiration.

  2. This pattern requires a unique property for every call to beginBackgroundTaskWithExpirationHandler which seems cumbersome if you have a larger app with lots of network methods.

To solve these issues, I wrote a singleton that takes care of all the plumbing and tracks active tasks in a dictionary. No properties needed to keep track of task identifiers. Seems to work well. Usage is simplified to:

//start the task
NSUInteger taskKey = [[BackgroundTaskManager sharedTasks] beginTask];

//do stuff

//end the task
[[BackgroundTaskManager sharedTasks] endTaskWithKey:taskKey];

Optionally, if you want to provide a completion block that does something beyond ending the task (which is built in) you can call:

NSUInteger taskKey = [[BackgroundTaskManager sharedTasks] beginTaskWithCompletionHandler:^{
    //do stuff
}];

Relevant source code available below (singleton stuff excluded for brevity). Comments/feedback welcome.

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {

        [self setTaskKeyCounter:0];
        [self setDictTaskIdentifiers:[NSMutableDictionary dictionary]];
        [self setDictTaskCompletionBlocks:[NSMutableDictionary dictionary]];

    }
    return self;
}

- (NSUInteger)beginTask
{
    return [self beginTaskWithCompletionHandler:nil];
}

- (NSUInteger)beginTaskWithCompletionHandler:(CompletionBlock)_completion;
{
    //read the counter and increment it
    NSUInteger taskKey;
    @synchronized(self) {

        taskKey = self.taskKeyCounter;
        self.taskKeyCounter++;

    }

    //tell the OS to start a task that should continue in the background if needed
    NSUInteger taskId = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] beginBackgroundTaskWithExpirationHandler:^{
        [self endTaskWithKey:taskKey];
    }];

    //add this task identifier to the active task dictionary
    [self.dictTaskIdentifiers setObject:[NSNumber numberWithUnsignedLong:taskId] forKey:[NSNumber numberWithUnsignedLong:taskKey]];

    //store the completion block (if any)
    if (_completion) [self.dictTaskCompletionBlocks setObject:_completion forKey:[NSNumber numberWithUnsignedLong:taskKey]];

    //return the dictionary key
    return taskKey;
}

- (void)endTaskWithKey:(NSUInteger)_key
{
    @synchronized(self.dictTaskCompletionBlocks) {

        //see if this task has a completion block
        CompletionBlock completion = [self.dictTaskCompletionBlocks objectForKey:[NSNumber numberWithUnsignedLong:_key]];
        if (completion) {

            //run the completion block and remove it from the completion block dictionary
            completion();
            [self.dictTaskCompletionBlocks removeObjectForKey:[NSNumber numberWithUnsignedLong:_key]];

        }

    }

    @synchronized(self.dictTaskIdentifiers) {

        //see if this task has been ended yet
        NSNumber *taskId = [self.dictTaskIdentifiers objectForKey:[NSNumber numberWithUnsignedLong:_key]];
        if (taskId) {

            //end the task and remove it from the active task dictionary
            [[UIApplication sharedApplication] endBackgroundTask:[taskId unsignedLongValue]];
            [self.dictTaskIdentifiers removeObjectForKey:[NSNumber numberWithUnsignedLong:_key]];

        }

    }
}
5
  • 1
    really like this solution. one question though: how/as what did you typedef CompletionBlock? Simply this: typedef void (^CompletionBlock)();
    – Joseph
    Mar 4, 2015 at 8:33
  • You got it. typedef void (^CompletionBlock)(void);
    – Joel
    Mar 5, 2015 at 15:12
  • @joel, thanks but where is the link of the source code for this implementation, i,e, BackGroundTaskManager ?
    – Özgür
    Jul 4, 2015 at 20:54
  • As noted above "singleton stuff excluded for brevity". [BackgroundTaskManager sharedTasks] returns a singleton. The guts of the singleton are provided above.
    – Joel
    Jul 5, 2015 at 5:23
  • Upvoted for using a singleton. I really don't think they are as bad as people make out! May 10, 2016 at 20:30
20

Here is a Swift class that encapsulates running a background task:

class BackgroundTask {
    private let application: UIApplication
    private var identifier = UIBackgroundTaskInvalid

    init(application: UIApplication) {
        self.application = application
    }

    class func run(application: UIApplication, handler: (BackgroundTask) -> ()) {
        // NOTE: The handler must call end() when it is done

        let backgroundTask = BackgroundTask(application: application)
        backgroundTask.begin()
        handler(backgroundTask)
    }

    func begin() {
        self.identifier = application.beginBackgroundTaskWithExpirationHandler {
            self.end()
        }
    }

    func end() {
        if (identifier != UIBackgroundTaskInvalid) {
            application.endBackgroundTask(identifier)
        }

        identifier = UIBackgroundTaskInvalid
    }
}

The simplest way to use it:

BackgroundTask.run(application) { backgroundTask in
   // Do something
   backgroundTask.end()
}

If you need to wait for a delegate callback before you end, then use something like this:

class MyClass {
    backgroundTask: BackgroundTask?

    func doSomething() {
        backgroundTask = BackgroundTask(application)
        backgroundTask!.begin()
        // Do something that waits for callback
    }

    func callback() {
        backgroundTask?.end()
        backgroundTask = nil
    } 
}
2
  • The same problem like in accepted answer. Expiration handler doesn't cancel real task, but only marks it as ended. More over encapsulation causes that we are not able to do that ourselves. That's why Apple exposed this handler, so encapsulation is wrong here. Jan 8, 2019 at 13:06
  • @ArielBogdziewicz It's true that this answer provides no opportunity for additional cleanup in the begin method, but it is easy to see how to add that feature.
    – matt
    Apr 30, 2019 at 17:00
9

As noted here and in answers to other SO questions, you do NOT want to use beginBackgroundTask only just when your app will go into the background; on the contrary, you should use a background task for any time-consuming operation whose completion you want to ensure even if the app does go into the background.

Therefore your code is likely to end up peppered with repetitions of the same boilerplate code for calling beginBackgroundTask and endBackgroundTask coherently. To prevent this repetition, it is certainly reasonable to want to package up the boilerplate into some single encapsulated entity.

I like some of the existing answers for doing that, but I think the best way is to use an Operation subclass:

  • You can enqueue the Operation onto any OperationQueue and manipulate that queue as you see fit. For example, you are free to cancel prematurely any existing operations on the queue.

  • If you have more than one thing to do, you can chain multiple background task Operations. Operations support dependencies.

  • The Operation Queue can (and should) be a background queue; thus, there is no need to worry about performing asynchronous code inside your task, because the Operation is the asynchronous code. (Indeed, it makes no sense to execute another level of asynchronous code inside an Operation, as the Operation would finish before that code could even start. If you needed to do that, you'd use another Operation.)

Here's a possible Operation subclass:

class BackgroundTaskOperation: Operation {
    var whatToDo : (() -> ())?
    var cleanup : (() -> ())?
    override func main() {
        guard !self.isCancelled else { return }
        guard let whatToDo = self.whatToDo else { return }
        var bti : UIBackgroundTaskIdentifier = .invalid
        bti = UIApplication.shared.beginBackgroundTask {
            self.cleanup?()
            self.cancel()
            UIApplication.shared.endBackgroundTask(bti) // cancellation
        }
        guard bti != .invalid else { return }
        whatToDo()
        guard !self.isCancelled else { return }
        UIApplication.shared.endBackgroundTask(bti) // completion
    }
}

It should be obvious how to use this, but in case it isn't, imagine we have a global OperationQueue:

let backgroundTaskQueue : OperationQueue = {
    let q = OperationQueue()
    q.maxConcurrentOperationCount = 1
    return q
}()

So for a typical time-consuming batch of code we would say:

let task = BackgroundTaskOperation()
task.whatToDo = {
    // do something here
}
backgroundTaskQueue.addOperation(task)

If your time-consuming batch of code can be divided into stages, you might want to bow out early if your task is cancelled. In that case, just return prematurely from the closure. Note that your reference to the task from within the closure needs to be weak or you'll get a retain cycle. Here's an artificial illustration:

let task = BackgroundTaskOperation()
task.whatToDo = { [weak task] in
    guard let task = task else {return}
    for i in 1...10000 {
        guard !task.isCancelled else {return}
        for j in 1...150000 {
            let k = i*j
        }
    }
}
backgroundTaskQueue.addOperation(task)

In case you have cleanup to do in case the background task itself is cancelled prematurely, I've provided an optional cleanup handler property (not used in the preceding examples). Some other answers were criticised for not including that.

3
  • I've now provided this as a github project: github.com/mattneub/BackgroundTaskOperation
    – matt
    May 3, 2019 at 19:25
  • Will the Queue continue (move on to the next operation) in the background? as the background handling is contained within the operation?
    – user134611
    Feb 25 at 16:11
  • (above comment)
    – user134611
    Feb 25 at 17:31
1

I implemented Joel's solution. Here is the complete code:

.h file:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface VMKBackgroundTaskManager : NSObject

+ (id) sharedTasks;

- (NSUInteger)beginTask;
- (NSUInteger)beginTaskWithCompletionHandler:(CompletionBlock)_completion;
- (void)endTaskWithKey:(NSUInteger)_key;

@end

.m file:

#import "VMKBackgroundTaskManager.h"

@interface VMKBackgroundTaskManager()

@property NSUInteger taskKeyCounter;
@property NSMutableDictionary *dictTaskIdentifiers;
@property NSMutableDictionary *dictTaskCompletionBlocks;

@end


@implementation VMKBackgroundTaskManager

+ (id)sharedTasks {
    static VMKBackgroundTaskManager *sharedTasks = nil;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        sharedTasks = [[self alloc] init];
    });
    return sharedTasks;
}

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {

        [self setTaskKeyCounter:0];
        [self setDictTaskIdentifiers:[NSMutableDictionary dictionary]];
        [self setDictTaskCompletionBlocks:[NSMutableDictionary dictionary]];
    }
    return self;
}

- (NSUInteger)beginTask
{
    return [self beginTaskWithCompletionHandler:nil];
}

- (NSUInteger)beginTaskWithCompletionHandler:(CompletionBlock)_completion;
{
    //read the counter and increment it
    NSUInteger taskKey;
    @synchronized(self) {

        taskKey = self.taskKeyCounter;
        self.taskKeyCounter++;

    }

    //tell the OS to start a task that should continue in the background if needed
    NSUInteger taskId = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] beginBackgroundTaskWithExpirationHandler:^{
        [self endTaskWithKey:taskKey];
    }];

    //add this task identifier to the active task dictionary
    [self.dictTaskIdentifiers setObject:[NSNumber numberWithUnsignedLong:taskId] forKey:[NSNumber numberWithUnsignedLong:taskKey]];

    //store the completion block (if any)
    if (_completion) [self.dictTaskCompletionBlocks setObject:_completion forKey:[NSNumber numberWithUnsignedLong:taskKey]];

    //return the dictionary key
    return taskKey;
}

- (void)endTaskWithKey:(NSUInteger)_key
{
    @synchronized(self.dictTaskCompletionBlocks) {

        //see if this task has a completion block
        CompletionBlock completion = [self.dictTaskCompletionBlocks objectForKey:[NSNumber numberWithUnsignedLong:_key]];
        if (completion) {

            //run the completion block and remove it from the completion block dictionary
            completion();
            [self.dictTaskCompletionBlocks removeObjectForKey:[NSNumber numberWithUnsignedLong:_key]];

        }

    }

    @synchronized(self.dictTaskIdentifiers) {

        //see if this task has been ended yet
        NSNumber *taskId = [self.dictTaskIdentifiers objectForKey:[NSNumber numberWithUnsignedLong:_key]];
        if (taskId) {

            //end the task and remove it from the active task dictionary
            [[UIApplication sharedApplication] endBackgroundTask:[taskId unsignedLongValue]];
            [self.dictTaskIdentifiers removeObjectForKey:[NSNumber numberWithUnsignedLong:_key]];

            NSLog(@"Task ended");
        }

    }
}

@end
3
  • 1
    Thanks for this. My objective-c isn't great. Could you add some code that show's how to use it?
    – pomo
    Jan 19, 2017 at 11:37
  • can you please give a complete example on how to use ur code
    – Amr Angry
    Apr 16, 2017 at 12:20
  • Very nice. Thanks.
    – Alyoshak
    Nov 17, 2017 at 21:12

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