18

So, there have been many variants of this question, and after looking at several I still can't figure it out.

This is the C code:

typedef struct
{
unsigned long Identifier;
char Name[128];
} Frame;

Frame GetFrame(int index);

This is the C# code:

struct Frame
{
    public ulong Identifier;
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, ArraySubType = UnmanagedType.I1, SizeConst = 128)]
    public char[] Name;
}

[DllImport("XNETDB.dll", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl, CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]
private static extern Frame GetFrame(int index);

This is the last attempt I tried in C#, and it seems pretty logical, but I get the error "Method's signature is not PInvoke compatible." So, I'm kind of lost on what to try next. Any help is appreciated.

Thanks, Kevin

Updated Kevin added this as an edit to my answer

I should instead change my C code:

void GetFrame(int index, Frame * f);

and use instead for C#:

struct Frame
{
    public uint Identifier;
    [MarshalAsAttribute(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = 128)]
    public string Name;
}

[DllImport("XNETDB.dll", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl, CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]
private static extern void GetFrame(int index, ref Frame f);
3
23

There are two problems with the PInvoke signature that you've chosen.

The first is easy to fix. You have a mistranslation of unsigned long. In C an unsigned long is typically only 4 bytes. You chose the C# type long which is 8 bytes. Changing the C# code to use uint will fix this.

The second is a bit harder. As Tergiver pointed out the CLR Marshaller only supports a struct in the return position if it's blittable. Blittable is a fancy way of saying that it has the exact same memory representation in native and managed code. The struct definition you've chosen isn't blittable because it has a nested array.

This can be worked around though if you remember that PInvoke is a very simple process. The CLR Marshaller really just needs you to answer 2 questions with the signature of your types and pinvoke methods

  • How many bytes am I copying?
  • In which direction do they need to go?

In this case the number of bytes is sizeof(unsigned long) + 128 == 132. So all we need to do is build up a managed type that is blittable and has a size of 132 bytes. The easiest way to do this is to define a blob to handle the array portion

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Size = 128)]
struct Blob
{
   // Intentionally left empty. It's just a blob
}

This is a struct with no members that will appear to the marshaller as having a size of 128 bytes (and as a bonus it's blittable!). Now we can easily define the Frame structure as a combination of an uint and this type

struct Frame
{
    public int Identifier;
    public Blob NameBlob;
    ...
}

Now we have a blittable type with a size the marshaller will see as 132 bytes. This means it will work just fine with the GetFrame signature you've defined

The only part left is giving you access to the actual char[] for the name. This is a bit tricky but can be solved with a bit of marshal magic.

public string GetName()
{
    IntPtr ptr = IntPtr.Zero;
    try
    {
        ptr = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(128);
        Marshal.StructureToPtr(NameBlob, ptr, false);
        return Marshal.PtrToStringAnsi(ptr, 128);
    }
    finally
    {
        if (ptr != IntPtr.Zero) 
        {
            Marshal.FreeHGlobal(ptr);
        }
    }
}

Note: I can't comment on the calling convention portion because I'm unfamiliar with the GetFrame API but that's something i would definitely check on.

12
  • I can't see that the type would be more or less compatible with P/Invoke based on this change, although it certainly is a porting problem that should be corrected.
    – Ben Voigt
    Apr 25 '12 at 17:27
  • 1
    @BenVoigt it can cause a big difference. In the original signature the marshaller will assume the char[] starts at offset 8 from the beginning of the struct vs. the real value of 4. As a result the marshaller sees 4 bytes which aren't really there. It will both write to these 4 bytes when marshalling to native and read these 4 bytes when marshalling back from native. The 4 bytes are essentially garbage and hence lead to undefined behavior
    – JaredPar
    Apr 25 '12 at 17:32
  • Of course it affects correctness. But it won't cause a compile error. Both ulong and uint are blittable, p/invoke handles them in the same fashion (although different extent).
    – Ben Voigt
    Apr 25 '12 at 17:44
  • 2
    @BenVoigt I don't think the user is getting a compiler error on either case. I believe it's a runtime error. The C# compiler doesn't use the work PInvoke in any of it's messages
    – JaredPar
    Apr 25 '12 at 17:47
  • It is a runtime error that I'm getting. Changing the ulong to uint still results in the exception "Method's signature is not PInvoke compatible." I am using another function from the same DLL that expects an unsigned long and importing the prototype with ulong or uint works successfully either way.
    – kevin.key
    Apr 25 '12 at 18:12
11

The problem is that the native function returns a non-blittable type as a return value.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ef4c3t39.aspx

P/Invoke cannot have non-blittable types as a return value.

You cannot p/Invoke that method. [EDIT It is actually possible, see JaredPar's answer]

Returning 132 bytes by value is a bad idea. If this native code is yours, I would fix it. You can fix it by allocating the 132 bytes and returning a pointer. Then add a FreeFrame method to release that memory. Now it can be p/Invoked.

Alternately, you could change it to accept a pointer to the Frame memory that it will fill in.

3
  • +1, completely forgot about the return type must be blittable rule. Agree that if you have control it's best to provide an easier layer. If you don't though I added a workable (but ugly) solution.
    – JaredPar
    Apr 25 '12 at 18:55
  • @kevin.key I would mark JaredPar's answer as the answer now as it does work directly if you can't change the native code.
    – Tergiver
    Apr 25 '12 at 19:11
  • I did mark it as the answer. The key was passing the struct by ref in C#, and changing the C function to pass the struct through a pointer parameter.
    – kevin.key
    Apr 25 '12 at 20:53
4

Another option to JaredPar's is to utilize the C# fixed size buffer feature. This does however require you to turn on the setting to allow unsafe code, but it avoids having 2 structs.

class Program
{
    private const int SIZE = 128;

    unsafe public struct Frame
    {
        public uint Identifier;
        public fixed byte Name[SIZE];
    }

    [DllImport("PinvokeTest2.DLL", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl, CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]
    private static extern Frame GetFrame(int index);

    static unsafe string GetNameFromFrame(Frame frame)
    {
        //Option 1: Use if the string in the buffer is always null terminated
        //return Marshal.PtrToStringAnsi(new IntPtr(frame.Name));

        //Option 2: Use if the string might not be null terminated for any reason,
        //like if were 128 non-null characters, or the buffer has corrupt data.

        return Marshal.PtrToStringAnsi(new IntPtr(frame.Name), SIZE).Split('\0')[0];
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        Frame a = GetFrame(0);
        Console.WriteLine(GetNameFromFrame(a));
    }
}
3
  • 1
    Nice one! You can use the PtrToStringAnsi overload with 128 size so that it will not overrun if there is no terminating NULL character.
    – Tergiver
    Apr 26 '12 at 16:54
  • 1
    If there is any possibility that there will not be a null character, then you should use the 2nd option I show, which does use that overload. Unfortunately AFAICT that overload will always create a string of 128 characters, instead of stopping at the first NULL. That is why I added the split on the null character, and selecting the first result. Apr 26 '12 at 18:26
  • You're right, the resulting string Length will be the size you pass.
    – Tergiver
    Apr 26 '12 at 18:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.