18
public void MyTest()
{
  bool eventFinished = false;

  myEventRaiser.OnEvent += delegate { doStuff(); eventFinished = true; };
  myEventRaiser.RaiseEventInSeperateThread()

  while(!eventFinished) Thread.Sleep(1);

  Assert.That(stuff);
}

Why can't eventFinished be volatile and does it matter?

It would seem to me that in this case the compiler or runtime could become to smart for its own good and 'know' in the while loop that eventFinished can only be false. Especially when you consider the way a lifted variable gets generated as a member of a class and the delegate as a method of that same class and thereby depriving optimizations of the fact that eventFinished was once a local variable.

5
  • 2
    Your variable is not local in this case! Rather, it is an instance variable in a compiler-generated class. Commented Jun 23, 2009 at 12:21
  • 4
    That is a semantic difference - in terms of the code, it is a local variable that happens to be captured... Commented Jun 23, 2009 at 12:26
  • 1
    What I 'see' is a local variable that is updated in a different thread. And even though I know the compiler will make an instance variable of my local variable, the pre-compiler apparently doesn't or is 'too stubborn' to acknowledge it. Commented Jun 23, 2009 at 12:35
  • 1
    I can't see how this is not a C# compiler bug? Or simply a pitfall of var capture? Either way, this pitfall combined with several other not so subtle ones in var capturing of anonymous methods have really turned C# into one big mess. Started out great, but now it's as bad / worse than C++ (I'd argue that it's worse considering these side effects are weird, unintuitive and useless). Again, there's no reason why it needs to be so bad if MSFT have put a little more thought into designing it properly before implementing these compiler features.
    – Zach Saw
    Commented Jun 23, 2011 at 8:07
  • Just another example of how C# has become way too complicated for its own good.
    – Zach Saw
    Commented Jun 23, 2011 at 8:09

4 Answers 4

12

There exists a threading primitive, ManualResetEvent to do precisely this task - you don't want to be using a boolean flag.

Something like this should do the job:

public void MyTest()
{
    var doneEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);

    myEventRaiser.OnEvent += delegate { doStuff(); doneEvent.Set(); };
    myEventRaiser.RaiseEventInSeparateThread();
    doneEvent.WaitOne();

    Assert.That(stuff);
}

Regarding the lack of support for the volatile keyword on local variables, I don't believe there is any reason why this might not in theory be possible in C#. Most likely, it is not supported simply because there was no use for such a feature prior to C# 2.0. Now, with the existence of anonymous methods and lambda functions, such support could potentially become useful. Someone please clarify matters if I'm missing something here.

12
  • 2
    Where's Eric when you need him? ;-p Commented Jun 23, 2009 at 12:33
  • 18
    If your threading and locking is so complex, performance-sensitive and processor-ordering-sensitive that you need to be marking stuff as volatile then you should not be relying on the compiler to do all kinds of crazy rewrites of local variables into fields of closure classes for you. You should be writing the code explicitly so that it is as clear and precise as possible, so as to communicate the exact semantics of the code to the maintenance programmers who will need to understand it. The point of the syntactic sugar is to hide the mechanism; you want to be exposing the mechanism! Commented Jun 23, 2009 at 18:40
  • 1
    What happens if the doneEvent.Set(); occur before doneEvent.WaitOne(); ?
    – Zanoni
    Commented Jun 23, 2009 at 20:11
  • 2
    Well the local itself couldn't be accessed by two different threads, as you point out, but the field created by the closure could. Marking a local variable as volatile could indicate that the field generated by the closure would be marked the same.
    – Noldorin
    Commented Jun 24, 2009 at 10:59
  • 7
    Look at it this way: the language makes no guarantee that hoisted locals are implemented as fields. They could be implemented as elements of an array, or properties, or whatever, as long as the language is able to generate code in the runtime that maintains the closure and variable semantics. Do we want to add a feature to the language that puts a big restriction on how compiler writers are allowed to generate code? No, particularly since the feature is a bad idea to begin with. Hoisted locals being fields is already a leaky abstraction; we don't want to make it worse. Commented Jun 24, 2009 at 13:50
10

In most scenarios, local variables are specific to a thread, so the issues associated with volatile are completely unnecessary.

This changes when, like in your example, it is a "captured" variable - when it is silently implemented as a field on a compiler-generated class. So in theory it could be volatile, but in most cases it wouldn't be worth the extra complexity.

In particular, something like a Monitor (aka lock) with Pulse etc could do this just as well, as could any number of other threading constructs.

Threading is tricky, and an active loop is rarely the best way to manage it...


Re the edit... secondThread.Join() would be the obvious thing - but if you really want to use a separate token, see below. The advantage of this (over things like ManualResetEvent) is that it doesn't require anything from the OS - it is handled purely inside the CLI.

using System;
using System.Threading;
static class Program {
    static void WriteLine(string message) {
        Console.WriteLine(Thread.CurrentThread.Name + ": " + message);
    }
    static void Main() {
        Thread.CurrentThread.Name = "Main";
        object syncLock = new object();
        Thread thread = new Thread(DoStuff);
        thread.Name = "DoStuff";
        lock (syncLock) {
            WriteLine("starting second thread");
            thread.Start(syncLock);
            Monitor.Wait(syncLock);
        }
        WriteLine("exiting");
    }
    static void DoStuff(object lockHandle) {
        WriteLine("entered");

        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            Thread.Sleep(500);
            WriteLine("working...");
        }
        lock (lockHandle) {
            Monitor.Pulse(lockHandle);
        }
        WriteLine("exiting");
    }
}
3
  • What if RaiseEventInSeperateThread() was effectively implemented as: new Thread(() => { Thread.sleep(100); OnEvent(); }; How would you use a Monitor or lock to have MyTest() wait for the event delegate to finish executing? Commented Jun 23, 2009 at 12:55
  • I mean: new Thread(() => { Thread.sleep(100); OnEvent(); }).Start(); Commented Jun 23, 2009 at 12:56
  • You'd have the one thread WaitOne and the other Pulse. I'll try to add an example later... Commented Jun 23, 2009 at 16:21
9

You could also use Voltile.Write if you want to make the local var behave as Volatile. As in:

public void MyTest()
{
  bool eventFinished = false;

  myEventRaiser.OnEvent += delegate { doStuff(); Volatile.Write(ref eventFinished, true); };
  myEventRaiser.RaiseEventInSeperateThread()

  while(!Volatile.Read(eventFinished)) Thread.Sleep(1);

  Assert.That(stuff);
}
1
  • 1
    good answer but your while loop should be using Volatile.Read
    – CoderBrien
    Commented Feb 23, 2017 at 1:37
2

What would happen if the Event raised didn't complete until after the process had exited the scope of that local variable? The variable would have been released and your thread would fail.

The sensible approach is to attach a delegate function that indicates to the parent thread that the sub-thread has completed.

5
  • The code is fine; that is a "captured" variable, and is implemented as a field on a compiler-generated class. The thread won't fail. Commented Jun 23, 2009 at 12:19
  • Couldn't it be the same case with a class-level variable, though? If the instance is garbage-collected before the event in the other thread finishes, then the same issue occurs.
    – Noldorin
    Commented Jun 23, 2009 at 12:20
  • It can't be garbage collected while it is still in the visible scope of either thread. Commented Jun 23, 2009 at 12:22
  • 1
    @Marc: Yeah, I just considered that after commenting. Nonetheless, volatile local variables can be useful on local variables in C# 2.0, it would seem.
    – Noldorin
    Commented Jun 23, 2009 at 12:26
  • I don't see how a garbage collector could 'steal the show' here. The MyTest() method is doing a semi- while(true){} loop while waiting for the result. The only bad that that can happen is if the event delegate forgot to set eventFinished to true and thereby causing MyTest() to hang. Luckily, I'm smart enough not to forget. ;-) Commented Jun 23, 2009 at 12:31

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