16

I've created a method to convert an int to a bitfield (in a list) and it works, but I'm sure there is more elegant solution- I've just been staring at it for to long.

I'm curious, how would you convert a int to a bitfield represented in a list?

def get(self):
    results = []

    results.append(1 if (self.bits &   1) else 0)
    results.append(1 if (self.bits &   2) else 0)
    results.append(1 if (self.bits &   4) else 0)
    results.append(1 if (self.bits &   8) else 0)
    results.append(1 if (self.bits &  16) else 0)
    results.append(1 if (self.bits &  32) else 0)
    results.append(1 if (self.bits &  64) else 0)
    results.append(1 if (self.bits & 128) else 0)

    return results

def set(self, pin, direction):
    pin -= 1
    if pin not in range(0, 8): raise ValueError

    if direction: self.bits |= (2 ** pin)
    else: self.bits &=~(2 ** pin)
29

How about this:

def bitfield(n):
    return [int(digit) for digit in bin(n)[2:]] # [2:] to chop off the "0b" part 

This gives you

>>> bitfield(123)
[1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1]
>>> bitfield(255)
[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]
>>> bitfield(1234567)
[1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1]

This only works for positive integers, though.

EDIT:

Conversion to int using int() is a bit overkill here. This is a lot faster:

def bitfield(n):
    return [1 if digit=='1' else 0 for digit in bin(n)[2:]]

See the timings:

>>> import timeit
>>> timeit.timeit("[int(digit) for digit in bin(123)[2:]]")
7.895014818543946
>>> timeit.timeit("[123 >> i & 1 for i in range(7,-1,-1)]")
2.966295244250407
>>> timeit.timeit("[1 if digit=='1' else 0 for digit in bin(123)[2:]]")
1.7918431924733795
  • [123 >> i & 1 for i in range(7,-1,-1)] is the fastest on my machine. – tMC Apr 25 '12 at 19:32
  • @tMC: I've redone the timings on both my PCs (Win 7 Ultimate 64bit), under Python 2.7.3 and 3.2.3, and my solution was always faster by at least 20 % (Python 2) and 45 % (Python 3). – Tim Pietzcker Apr 25 '12 at 19:38
  • the difference is negligible. I just thought it was interesting that i got different results on my Linux laptop. – tMC Apr 25 '12 at 19:49
21

This doesn't use bin:

 b = [n >> i & 1 for i in range(7,-1,-1)]

and this is how to handle any integer this way:

 b = [n >> i & 1 for i in range(n.bit_length() - 1,-1,-1)]

See bit_length.

If you want index 0 of the list to correspond to the lsb of the int, change the range order, i.e.

b = [n >> i & 1 for i in range(0, n.bit_length()-1)]

Note also that using n.bit_length() can be a point of failure if you're trying to represent fixed length binary values. It returns the minimum number of bits to represent n.

  • This is perfect- I knew there was a list comprehension I was missing – tMC Apr 25 '12 at 19:07
  • 1
    It may handle any integers in this way: [n >> i & 1 for i in range(n.bit_length() - 1,-1,-1)] – mennanov Feb 25 '16 at 8:20
  • @mennanov: thanks, added (btw, feel free to edit posts if you have something valuable to add). – georg Feb 25 '16 at 9:31
  • For the sake of performance, you should use %2 instead of &1, even though the latter looks smarter: timeit.timeit("n=193; n%2") returns 0.043587817999650724, while timeit.timeit("n=193; n&1") returns 0.0545583209986944 (I set n to an arbitrary value so as to avoid optimizations). – Right leg Jan 28 '19 at 12:37
4

Try

>>>n=1794
>>>bitfield=list(bin(n))[2:]
>>>bitfield
['1', '1', '1', '0', '0', '0', '0', '0', '0', '1', '0']

This does not work for negative n though and as you see gives you a list of strings

  • 1
    +1, I seem to forget that there is list() constructor all the time. – Fenikso Apr 25 '12 at 19:06
  • Even though it does not return list of integers. – Fenikso Apr 25 '12 at 19:09
  • This is not what tMC asked for. He needs a list of integers, you give him a list of strings. As nice as the list() constructor may be, it's not the right tool here. – Tim Pietzcker Apr 25 '12 at 19:09
  • map(lambda b: int(b), bitfield) – Kroltan Jun 15 '14 at 2:42
  • 1
    @Kroltan map(int, bitfield) – sigjuice Jan 21 '19 at 21:46
0

I'm doing this for my program where you specify a template to get your values from an int:

def field(template, value):
    sums = [int(v) if v.__class__==str else len(bin(v))-2 for v in template]
    return [(value>> (sum(sums[:i]) if i else 0) )&(~(~0<<int(t)) if t.__class__==str else t) for i,t in enumerate(template)]

how to use
in the template, specify ints relating to your bit-sizes:

field([0b1,0b111,0b1111], 204) #>>> [0, 6, 12]

or you can specify the bit-size of each value needed using strings: (noob friendly)

field(['1','3','4'], 204) #>>> [0, 6, 12]

EDIT: and vice versa: (separate code)

field(['1','3','4'], [0, 6, 12]) #>>> 204
field([0b1,0b111,0b1111], [0,3,9]) #>>> 150

the code:

def field(template, value):
    res = 0
    for t, v in zip(template, value)[::-1]: res = (res << (t.bit_length() if t.__class__ is int else int(t)) )|v
    return res

EDIT2: faster code^

0

Does not work for negative values

>>> import numpy as np
>>> [int(x) for x in np.binary_repr(123)]
[1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1]

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.